Working Class Hero: 1958 Triton for Sale

1958 Triton L Side

One of my favorite things about motorcycles is the seeming endless ways there are to mix and match parts to create new machines. Chain drive and fairly simple frames mean that it’s no big deal to say, sling an RD400 motor into the old GS500E you have lying around. But while many of these creations are born of necessity or just to see if it can be done, the classic Triton was a very functional motorcycle that actually managed to achieve some legitimacy among the motorcycling community.

1958 Triton R Side Engine

The Triton was a hybrid that used a Triumph parallel-twin engine and the famously excellent-handling Norton “featherbed” frame to create a seriously nimble motorcycle with good power and endless tuning potential. It also happens to be the name of the half-man, half-fish son of Poseidon in Greek mythology, something that the motorcycling community has sadly not capitalized on.

1958 Triton Dash

The choice of a Triumph engine might seem odd at first. After all, in stock form, it was actually a bit more powerful than the Triumph. But the Norton’s longer-stroke engine had a much higher piston speed and was considered less reliable, and a wealth of performance parts and tuning expertise were available for the Triumph as well.

1958 Triton L Side Engine

Interestingly, the non-unit design of both bikes meant that either four-speed gearbox could be used, although the Norton’s was generally considered superior. Really, all it took to make a Triton was a couple of donor bikes and a set of engine/transmission mounting plates, so it wasn’t too difficult to build one if you were reasonably competent with a set of tools, and plenty of these were built then and are being built today, so “authenticity” is hard to define and hard to verify.

From the original eBay listing: 1958 Triton for Sale

Ultimate Cafe Racer

1958 Norton Featherbed frame (Model 88)

1971 Triumph T120R engine with 4 speed transmission.

  • Unity Special Equipe UNAX2 Polished aluminum, Lyta style, 3 Gallon Short Circuit fuel tank.
  • Unity Wideline oiltank w/ battery holder
  • Unity Wideline Seat
  • Unity Fiberglass Fenders
  • Gold Star Silencers
  • Converta Engine plates
  • 4 Leading shoe Brake hubs
  • Akront Rims laced by Hagon
  • Far too many parts to list them all. For more information please feel free to contact us with your inquiries. 
  • Clocks show 269 Miles. Actual mileage is unknown. 
  • Was acquired from a museum. Rides and sounds wonderful. 

1958 Triton R Side Rear

I don’t know all that much about Tritons, but I know enough to know that they naturally vary a bit from bike to bike, since there’s no such thing as a “factory” example. These really do take the best bits and incorporate them into one of the most beautiful bikes of the era: everything is on display here, and looks purposefully industrial, but hand-crafted and decorative at the same time… So far, bidding is very slow, with the Reserve Not Met at $5,000 which is obviously well below where I expect this to sell, but maybe someone will manage to scoop a bargain with this one…


1958 Triton L Side Riding


Vintage Grand Prix: 1982 Suzuki RGB500 for Sale

1982 Suzuki RGB500 R Front

When Suzuki dipped their toe back into Grand Prix competition in the early 1970’s, it was with a production-based, water-cooled two-stroke twin from the T500. But while that bike did see some success, it was clear early on that a ground-up redesign would be needed. What followed was the twin-crankshaft, disc-valved square-four format that we all know and love from the RG500 Gamma road bike. In racing trim the RG500 was extremely successful in the hands of riders like Barry Sheene and variations the bike were a dominant force through much of the 1980’s.

1982 Suzuki RGB500 L Side

Of note are the air-assisted anti-dive forks, something that I’m sure works well here or they would never have been included, although roadgoing versions are of dubious value. Also of note is what appears to be a coolant expansion tank on the inside of the front fairing, something I haven’t seen on other examples.

1982 Suzuki RGB500 Dash

This one comes to us from our new best friend Gianluca over in Italy and is clearly photographed, something you’d expect when we’re looking at so rare a machine, especially considering an ex-racebike could be in very tatty condition.

1982 Suzuki RGB500 L Grip

From the original eBay listing: 1982 Suzuki RGB500 for Sale

model year 1982

VIN 10003 
Engine 10072

This is an Iconic model and does not need any presentation. The bike advertised has a very low VIN number, it was rebuilt 15years ago and rarely used, just paraded, it comes also with original cylinders. This is the bike bought and used my Riondato (Italian Champion in the 350cc class) beetween 1982 and 1984 in the Italian and European Championship including the 200miles of Imola. 

Race and collect! Bulletproof investment.

Bike is currently located in 33080 Roveredo in Piano, Pordenone, Italy but I can get them delivered all around the World at cost, no problem.

1982 Suzuki RGB500 Clutch

Clearly photographed and in beautiful, but well-used condition, what more could you ask for in an eBay listing? The original listing also includes some period photographs of the bike in action, although the paint scheme has changed since then to a more traditional Suzuki blue-and-white design, a decision that works for me: racebikes get crashed, painted, re-painted, torn apart, and rebuilt, so “originality” is pretty relative anyway.


1982 Suzuki RGB500 R Engine


Original Axe Murderer: Unrestored 1974 Kawasaki H2 750 Mach IV for Sale

1974 Kawasaki H2 750 Mach IV L Side

There’d been plenty of fast bikes prior to the Kawasaki two-stroke triples, of course, but while those were “introduced” in a conventional sense, the H1 and H2 were more accurately “unleashed on an unsuspecting public.” Never before had a bike’s ferocious engine so overwhelmed the limited chassis technology and brakes of the period in such a marketable way.

1974 Kawasaki H2 750 Mach IV R Side Front

By modern standards, and on paper, the power of the bigger 750 was fairly modest: just 75hp in a 450lb motorycle. But that was on paper. In reality, it wasn’t the quantity that made the power so terrifying, it was the sudden and violent two-stroke delivery. I’m sure you could ride your buddy’s around all day at low rpm and wonder what the fuss was all about. But whack that throttle open and hold it, hold it, and it would try to yank your arms out of their sockets.

Which was also fine, until you tried to stop, or go around a corner.

1974 Kawasaki H2 750 Mach IV Dash.JP

That lightswitch delivery combined with feeble brakes and a flexible frame that laughed in the face of words like “handling” and “stability.” This was a gas-sucking straight-line monster that suited American roads, the perfect Japanese alternative to big-displacement bikes like Kawasaki’s own Z1 that were so popular here during that period.

1974 Kawasaki H2 750 Mach IV R Engine

Many of the Mach IV’s that show up here on eBay seem to be painted in a very nice blue color that suits the bike very well. But this original, unmolested bike is an appropriately 70s green that is far more subtle and effectively evokes that glorious period of polyester and 8-tracks.

From the original eBay listing: 1974 Kawasaki H2 750 Mach IV for Sale

You are bidding on a 1974 Kawasaki H2, 750 Mach IV, often referred to as “THE WIDOW MAKER”. My brother Mike bought this bike new in 1975 and it has never been for sale since that time, he has decided to sell it now.

This is a one owner 1974 Kawasaki H2 Mach IV in excellent condition.  This is an all original, ALWAYS GARAGED collectors piece that runs as designed.  This is a survivor, it has never been painted, it has the original title, seat, original mufflers, owners manual, etc.

The title is a MO title.  In MO you can keep the old title for your collection and apply for your new title in your name.

This bike even with the few dents and paint issues is as nice a bike as you will find that has never been restored and has been owned by only one person.  The bike was purchased new from Junior Mills Kawasaki in JoplinMO the first quarter of 1975.  The original title says 4/10/1975.

There are 11,000 original and accurate miles on this bike.  The chain, sprocket, tires and some rubber parts were replaced approximately 1000 miles and 5 years ago. It is in excellent running condition and runs like it did when new.  I have driven it about 100 miles in the last few days, it’s fun.  If you have never driven one of these it is an experience.

1974 Kawasaki H2 750 Mach IV R Side Rear

As they say, “it’s only original once” and that’s especially desirable when “original” is as nice as this one appears to be. While heavily patina’d bikes are all the rage these days, I’d personally rather ride around on something that cleans up nicely and shines a bit.

All of Kawasaki’s wild two-stroke triples are currently rocketing upwards in value, so at $6,500.00 with five days left on the auction, this one is obviously nowhere near its final price.


1974 Kawasaki H2 750 Mach IV R Side


The Real Thing? 1974 Ducati 750 Sport for Sale

1974 Ducati 750 Sport R Front

One of the best-looking bikes of this or any other period, the Ducati 750 Sport is one of those machines that looks fast, even standing still, the kind of bike that people will stop and stare at when they see one parked on the street, even if the next words out of their mouth are, “Ducati… Is that made by Harley?

1974 Ducati 750 Sport Low R Front

Very spare and very lean, the 750 Sport was the marginally faster, significantly less comfortable version of the 750GT. The tank was longer, and narrower for a sleeker profile, with a classic “bum-stop” seat along with racy clip-ons and rearsets.

1974 Ducati 750 Sport R Engine

It included larger carburetors and high-performance engine internals you’d expect, although it did not use Desmodromic valves, something that was found only on the Super Sport models until the introduction of the Pantah engine in 1980. But from a visual standpoint, the Sport still has that classic, “round-case” bevel-drive style, with the pronounced tower-shaft housings and bevel-gear castings in the heads.

1974 Ducati 750 Sport Front Brakes

This example also features a dual-disc brake front end, which is a nice, period-appropriate upgrade to the much more common single unit. In typical Ducati form, “whatever’s on the shelf” seemed to apply to these bikes, with Lockheed, Scarab, and Brembo calipers being used depending on the bike, day of the week, and mood of the guy at the factory putting it together.

From the original eBay listing: 1974 Ducati 750 Sport for Sale

This bike was bought by it current owner in 1975 with 1,300 miles on it.
The bike has some minor upgrades to its electricals and mechanicals.
It also includes a GT seat, tank and bar adapter kit as pictured.
Wow! Nice Bike!

1974 Ducati 750 Sport L Front2

Make no mistake, this looks like it is a very “Nice Bike.” But the short and to-the-point description does leave some unanswered questions. “10,000” miles are indicated in the listing, but the odometer clearly shows 30,000. And the bike has obviously received more than “minor upgrades” as the paint is different, the exhaust is different, the top triple and bars are different. So exactly what is the story with this bike? What kind of motorcycle do we have here? Is it really a Sport, or a dressed up GT?

1974 Ducati 750 Sport L Engine

I’m guessing that this was originally a 750 Sport that the owner modified with higher controls and a more comfortable seat to make the bike more practical, along with a few other “aesthetic” changes like the blacked-out Contis. Then the bike was more recently put back into its original configuration, perhaps with an eye towards selling it.

1974 Ducati 750 Sport Dash

The odometer readings do seem to add up, assuming the seller hasn’t ridden the bike much since the restoration, and the photos in the original listing clearly display a VIN number and stampings on the engine cases. Any of our expert readers care to chime in on this one? It’s obviously in beautiful shape, but is it one to ride, or one to collect?


1974 Ducati 750 Sport L Rear


Brooklands Bomber: 1960 BSA Gold Star for Sale

1960 BSA Gold Star R Front

In the past twenty years, we’ve gotten so used to artificially-condensed product life cycles that it’s easy to forget how durable modern machines can be. That’s one of the things that makes vintage bikes so popular: manufacturing and technology didn’t really allow for things to be as reliable as they are today, but they were built to last, and to be owned and maintained by normal people. Just look at the BSA Gold Star: built between 1938 and 1963, it had a life span that would make a Yamaha R6 blush.

1960 BSA Gold Star L Rear

Simple, reliable, and powerful, the 500cc overhead-valve single weighed under 400lbs dry and put power through a four-speed gearbox. Named for the award given to bikes that could lap the famous Brooklands circuit at over 100mph. A smaller, 350cc version was also built and both were campaigned in both on and offroad competition.

1960 BSA Gold Star R Engine

Today’s Gold Star is obviously from later in the production run, but not much changed between the 1950 and 1960 models.

From the original eBay listing: 1960 BSA Gold Star for Sale

BSA Gold Star 1960 very original and clean has been stored for years and cannot verify mileage but I would not be surprised if it is the correct mileage. Starts second kick cold and first kick warm very quiet engine no smoke sounds very tight. the front fender has some peeling chrome and the horn is missing. Pick up from Prescott AZ will help with loading if commercial carrier is used. The motorcycle is super clean and I hate to part with it as it will be very difficult to replace.

1960 BSA Gold Star R Rear

As the seller indicates, the chrome on the front fender is peeling pretty badly, but this is otherwise a very nice example. While modern instruments may be very functional, accurate, and reliable, but those Smiths clocks are works of art! And that chrome and blue tank is a combination I can’t remember seeing and is very classy.


1960 BSA Gold Star Clocks


Like a Fly Trapped in Amber: 1959 Ducati Elite for Sale

1959 Ducati Elite 200 R Side

This jewel-like Ducati Elite is more of an object d’art than a living, breathing motorcycle. Like the titular bug embedded in fossilized tree sap, the world has passed this little time capsule of a motorcycle by, leaving it perfectly preserved, but very dead.

1959 Ducati Elite 200 L Side

Which is a shame: these little Ducatis were created with the same passion as their larger siblings and were often very competitive in small-displacement racing classes. Introduced in 1958 and displacing 204cc, the Elite was light, sporty, and very sexy. With 18 flexible horses and a four-speed gearbox, it could reach almost 90mph, a pretty impressive number for such a small machine.

And even if it could barely go around corners, just look at that beautiful “jelly mould” tank and striking paint scheme! With all the retro designs Ducati has tried over the years, I’m surprised they’ve not yet tried to recapture this little darling.

1959 Ducati Elite 200 R Side Rear

From the original eBay listing: 1959 Ducati Elite for Sale

This Ducati Elite came from the incredible RM Sothebys Monaco auction of 2012, from the Carlo Salterelli Collection in conjunction with the Ducati factory. This auction was much publicized in the motorcycle press for the unprecedented scope of Salterelli’s collection from it’s earliest single cylinder Ducatis to some of it’s finest v-twin and single racers. There’s much information online which can be easily searched regarding this incredible collection and auction. After winning the auction this motorcycle was shipped to Los Angeles and placed in my office to be enjoyed as a motorcycle sculpture.

I’ve never attempted to start this bike, but it does have good compression and can select all gears with ease. I have just enjoyed it’s pleasing lines. I’ve attached the images of the catalog and I feel that the auction company’s description is apt and the accompanying photographs best describe the motorcycle better than I can.

It has minor nicks, scratches and blemishes but no major-offending issues. It is a very beautiful bike and I think the new owner will be pleased with this incredibly rare motorcycle, with the excellent provenance of coming from the Salterelli Collection (an ex-Ducati factory works racer, test rider and factory based dealer).  It would be impossible to duplicate such history and factory connections that this motorcycle has. The auction catalogs and all accompanying paperwork will be included in the bike’s sale. There is no title, but a Bill of Sale only, as it has never been registered in California.

1959 Ducati Elite 200 In Situ

These are beautiful little motorcycles and although I appreciate that some collectors have saved these for posterity, keeping them in visually perfect condition, I feel like it completely misses the point. Certainly, there are show bikes and cars meant to be barely functional metalwork confections that aren’t intended to be used on the road.

But the Elite combines both show and go in what was originally a relatively affordable, practical package. This is a very nice example, but I hope the next owner spends the time and money to get it back on the road where it belongs.


1959 Ducati Elite 200 Dash


Sturm und Drang: 1978 Ducati 900SS Bevel Racer in Germany

1978 Ducati 900SS Racer L Front

From the land of Vorsprung durch Technik comes a very low-technik Italian bike built for going very fast. Clearly based around a square-case, bevel-drive 900SS, this Ducati race bike currently resides in Germany but, since you’re never going to register it for road use, that shouldn’t worry anyone here in the US tempted to splash out the cash necessary to put this into their garage or foyer.

1978 Ducati 900SS Racer L Side

The 900 Super Sport was introduced in 1975 to follow up their 750SS and is far more common than that very rare motorcycle. It is easily identifiable by its revised square case engine that was restyled to work better with Giorgetto Giugiaro’s Ducati designs. While his GT bikes were certainly controversial in terms of style, the more angular look of the engine works just fine with the more traditional half-fairing on the SS bikes.

1978 Ducati 900SS Racer L Side Naked

Engine internals were similar to the 750 with the usual evolutionary changes and a displacement increase to 864cc, along with a change to a left-side gearshift designed for the important US market. Later 900’s featured cast wheels and while those are obviously more advanced, these earlier spoked wheels look the business and suit the bike far better, I think.

1978 Ducati 900SS Racer Cockpit

Complete with open bellmouths on the carburetors and a classy Gear Gazer for the rear cylinder, this isn’t the most original Ducati I’ve seen, but it’s one of the coolest.

1978 Ducati 900SS Racer R Engine Detail

From the original eBay listing: 1978 Ducati 900SS Race Bike for Sale

You are looking for a Ducati racer. We have a special one:

Frame: Molybdenum
Pistons: 92 Pistonrace,
Carillo connecting rods,
dry clutch,
Valves: Mimonic,
Cucusan electronic ignition,
Dellorto race 41,
engine was prepared by Lauro Micozzi
Titanium muffler,
aluminium wheels,
racing shock absorbers

1978 Ducati 900SS Racer L Side Engine Detail

Bidding is only up to $12,000 with one day left on the auction. It’s a little rough around the edges, but this thing looks brutally fast and appears to be very well-prepared if your tastes run to the effective rather than the pretty. While it would obviously make a very impressive livingroom decoration, I get the feeling that this one would be much more at home hammering around a racetrack

Personally, I’d take this 900SS over a meticulously restored or pristine original example any day of the week and twice on Sunday, since everyone knows that Sunday is a Day of Riding.


1978 Ducati 900SS Racer R Side


Damaged Goods: 1985 Laverda SFC1000 for Sale

1985 Laverda SFC1000 L Side

Like Ducati, Laverda struggled against the might of the Japanese Big Four once they hit their stride and figured out how to make stuff handle. Strapped for cash, they tended to keep models in production for far longer than was competitive, and had a habit of slapping some fresh bodywork and a new name onto old frames and engines to make bikes like this SFC1000. But when that engine is Laverda’s storming 981cc three-cylinder, at least you know you’re growing obsolete in style!

1985 Laverda SFC1000 R Side Engine

The SFC1000 was a bit like Ducati’s MHR bikes, a reach back to past glories to help stimulate sales. The original SFC was named for it’s massive front drum brake and stood for “Super Freni Competizione.” Literally: “Super Brakes Racing.” And while the SFC1000 undoubtedly stopped pretty well, it was a far-cry from the barely streetable, twin-cylinder, homologation SFC. Early triples used a firing order that made great power but vibrated severely. By the time the SFC1000 rolled around, Laverda had switched to a much smoother design that made for a more civilized bike, but one that had fans grumbling about “character.”

1985 Laverda SFC1000 L Side Fairing

So the SFC1000 really was a big, burly GT machine, capable of covering miles in serious style. And there’s nothing at all wrong with that. For the record, this is the kind of white-faced tach I love: Veglia in particular makes such a classy-looking gauge, and it looks especially slick in that bare-aluminum dash.

1985 Laverda SFC1000 Clocks

This bike is rare and beautiful, but there’s a “but” here. I’ll let the seller tell you about it. From the original eBay listing: 1985 Laverda SFC1000 for Sale

I’ve owned the bike for about 8 years. Originally purchased at Slater’s by a former Laverda shop in Calif and brought in to the U.S. under the radar around 1987. Bike sat in the shop for close to 20 years. I jumped through a lot of hoops to purchase it, having owned two much lesser condition SFC1000’s that I bought in England, prior, but never shipped back the US. I put a ton of time and dough into recommissioning this bike to ride and run perfectly. It hauls ass like a pack of scalded cats. This bike won second place at the Laverda National Meet at Mid-Ohio in 2008, as judged by Piero Laverda. She only has original 2398 original kilometers (1490 miles) on the clock – not even broken in.  Does not leak even a drop of oil – ever.

So, sounds great so far, right? Beautiful bike. But then the seller dumped it in his wet driveway, causing some cosmetic damage:

I was sick over this for months. Here I am exactly a year later, and I have come to terms with reality, that I have neither the time nor energy to tend to making this bike right again. That’s where you come in.

What does she need? New mirrors, a right turn signal, repair fairing (easy for someone with fiberglass skills). Fix dings in fuel tank from the clip-on bar hitting the tank. New right muffler. The ‘SFC1000’ right side foot peg mount is tweaked and may be able to be straightened, else replaced. Right side engine cover. Front Brake lever and perhaps master cyl assembly. Right side foot peg and brake pedal rubber – all detailed in the photos. The bike will need to be painted, I guess. Anyhow, the issues are all cosmetic. Mechanically, this bike is as new, perhaps better.

Parts are all readily available from Wolfgang at Columbia Car and Cycle in British Columbia, Canada and at Laverda Paradies in Germany, including the fairing, alternator cover, muffler, and SFC1000 footpeg mount.

To get ‘er runnin’ you’ll need to drain the carb bowls and clean the pilot jets most likely, as the fuel has been in there for a year. Top off the AGM sealed battery charge. The tires are good, but about 9 years old, so replacing is a good idea. Bleed the brake and clutch systems.

At this point, I want this girl go to a great Laverda home, where she’ll get the attention and care she deserves. You must agree to send me photos as you put the bike back in order, and when it’s all done.

1985 Laverda SFC1000 R Side Engine Ouch

Head on over to the original eBay listing for the seller’s account of exactly what happened and some other updates to the bike. Minor cosmetic damage aside, this is a really nice bike and very rare here in the states. A bit of time spent on eBay and a few weekends of the usual work to get a bike that’s been sitting for a year or so ready for the road. The dings in the tank will take a bit more work, but I’d just snap this one up and ride it with the battle scars until I could afford to have it fixed correctly. If you’re not afraid to get your hands dirty, this could make a great bargain, depending on where the reserve is set.


1985 Laverda SFC1000 R Side Fairing Damage


Perfect Recreation: 1961 Norton Manx Replica for Sale

1961 Norton Manx Replica R Front

For many vintage motorcycle enthusiasts, the Commando is what first springs to mind when you mention Norton. But while that bike was stunning to look at and fast, its design wasn’t really cutting-edge, even when new. For vintage racing fans however, the name Norton probably conjures up images of this bike, the Norton Manx, a bike whose technical specification set the standard for privateer racing in a career that spanned 20 years, an almost impossible-to-imagine longevity in a sport where last year’s bike isn’t a classic, it’s just slow.

1961 Norton Manx Replica R Side Rear

The single-cylinder engine came in two flavors: 500 and 350cc’s. Both used reliable and precise bevel drive and tower shafts to work the dual overhead cams. But while the engine was sophisticated and reasonably powerful, it was just part of the picture and far from the bike’s defining characteristic. Instead, it was the bike’s “featherbed” frame that was the standout feature. The innovative frame was lightweight, stiff, and featured a swingarm rear for excellent roadholding that allowed it to compete against much more powerful machines.

1961 Norton Manx Replica Dash

Christened the Featherbed frame by racer Harold Daniel who described the experience of racing the bike like “riding on a featherbed.” That’s obviously a far cry from the “riding on a bedframe” experience of most motorcycles built when motorcycle frame technology was still in its infancy. But amazingly, the Manx was still winning races almost ten years later…

1961 Norton Manx Replica L Side Engine

So the bikes were stone-axe reliable, nimble, and made decent power, making them hugely versatile tools for the wide variety of events held during that period. In fact, the folks at Molnar will still be happy to build you a perfect replica of the original Manx today, if you have the cash…

From the original eBay listing: 1961 Norton Manx Replica for Sale

I have for sale here a “new” Norton Manx Replica.  This bike was built in the image of a 1961 Manx.  The bike is a re-creation, built to modern standards.  I am relisting the motorcycle with lower Buy It Now and lower reserve.  It was previously listed as a 1962 Manx Replica but Andy Molnar pointed out the single-sided brake is proper for 1961 and earlier, not 1962.

The bike’s features are:

  • New, never run, Molnar Precision Limited 500 cc. DOHC motor.  I have a copy of the original build sheet.
  • Believed new Mick Hemmings Quaife 5 spd. transmission.
  • New Molnar Precision Lightweight beltdrive
  • New Featherbed frame produced by Andover Norton
  • Newly strung alloy wheels, built by Buchanan on proper period magnesium hubs, all new bearings/axles
  • New Ken McIntosh oil and fuel tanks
  • New tachometer 
  • New Amal GP carburetor and Matchbox floatbowl
  • New controls including levers, throttle, rearsets and all cables
  • New seat
  • New exhaust pipe and megaphone
  • Number plates are alloy, not plastic, and new
  • All new nuts and bolts, proper Manx rifle-drilled where appropriate.  The number plate and fender bolts are aerodynamic stainless from Racing Norton
  • Rebuilt, period correct Featherbed forks, new internals, new rear suspension units
  • New alloy fenders
  • New fairing and windscreen

This bike has recently been professionally completed and as noted, has not been run, in respect for its “new” condition.  The Molnar motor was factory equipped with a PVL electronic racing ignition hidden in the stock magneto housing, and initial timing was set at the factory.  (NOTE:  If you intend to purchase this motorcycle to race in a class that prohibits electronic ignitions, I do have a newly rebuilt Lucas magneto that is available separately.)

Andy Molnar is well aware of this motor and will be pleased to discuss it with a purchaser.  The initial cost of the motor is roughly half the Buy It Now price.

An individual purchasing this motorcycle to display will be pleased with the beauty of the bike and the quality of construction and the fact that there has never been petrol or oil in the tanks (I believe this makes international shipping easier as well).  A racer acquiring the bike to compete will need to safety-wire as required by sanctioning bodies.

1961 Norton Manx Replica Shifter

Keep in mind that, in this case, “replica” is underselling it a bit. Molnar makes what are basically recreations of the original Manx bikes, similar to “continuation” Cobras. They’re the real deal in every way, except that they weren’t built fifty years ago. In many ways, this is actually more desirable to anyone who wants to use the bike in anger, since they won’t be risking an irreplaceable piece of racing history and will get a very authentic experience racing one of the most perfectly designed and executed motorcycles of all time.


1961 Norton Manx Replica L Side


Orange Twin: Low-Mileage 1973 Laverda 750 SF1 for Sale

1973 Laverda SF1 R Side Front

The biggest challenge for Laverda lovers isn’t finding a nice bike, it’s finding any bike. Basket case and project Triumphs are all over eBay, hiding out on Craigslist and in garages and basements all over the place. But Laverda was never really a big name here, and bikes as nice as this drum-braked SF1 are hard to come by. And that’s a shame because Laverdas are fundamentally very solid machines. Overbuilt and rugged, with quality parts sourced from the very best period sources.

Honestly, it’s probably much easier to import one from the UK, although registration might prove difficult, depending on where you live.

1973 Laverda SF1 L Side Front

You might think of Laverda as “The Lamborghini of Motorcycles”: both companies got their start manufacturing heavy machinery and branched out into performance machinery. Although, unlike Lamborghini, Laverda didn’t jump in with both feet to start making high-powered exotica. Their first bikes were designed to capitalize on the postwar mobilization of the workforce, and were smaller-displacement machines. But they had their sights set on the likes of Triumph, and they knew they needed something bigger.

1973 Laverda SF1 Dash

That “something” was their 650 parallel-twin that quickly grew into the 750 seen here that was stable, fast, and extremely well-built. The “SF” in the name stood for “Super Freni” or “super braking” and referred to that huge front drum brake. Later bikes switched to a twin-disc front set up that offered improved performance, but the look of the early drum-braked bikes is hard to beat.

1973 Laverda SF1 R Side Rear

From the original eBay listing: 1973 Laverda 750 SF1 for Sale

Here we have a low mileage original paint 1973 750 SF1 euro market in extremely nice condition. Matching numbers VIN #13120. This bike was owned by the late Wes Cooley Sr. since 1980 and it only has 1243 Kilometers which is around 770 miles. I believe the miles to be original considering the condition the bike is in.  The 73′ SF1 is the 750 most sought after by collectors and enthusiast and is quite different than the SF2, for starters it has a chrome CEV headlight bucket and Lucas switches.  The SF1 also have bigger PHF 36mm Dellorto carbs instead of the 30mm found on the SF2 or SF3 and a bigger cylinder head as well,  This one still has the original expansion chamber between the headers and Conti mufflers.  This expansion chamber also known as the banana and the Conti mufflers are only found on the 73 SF1 as well. This bike is a true collectors piece and a beautiful time capsule and it will make a great addition to your collection  The tank and sidecovers still have the original orange paint from 1973 and it’s never been repainted.  Frame is also the original black from factory. 

When I took possession of the bike I gave it a good cleaning and removed the half inch layer of dust that covered most of the bike.  The tank and carbs had been properly drained many years ago and they didn’t take much to rebuild.  I was relieved to see how clean the inside of the carbs were.  They received new seals and O-rings by the way.  The seat is the original cover and it starting to come apart at the seams.  Also added a new battery and replaced the rubber intake boots they were cracked. It also received an oil change and new air filter from Wolfgang Too my knowledge I don’t believe the handlebars are original factory bars, however they are period correct and probably dealer installed when new. 

This bike runs very strong and idles like a clock.  I can provide a video of it running if seriously interested.  I also have more pictures that I was not able to include in the listing.  As far as the chrome goes it’s in very good condition.  Mufflers do not have any dings or dents.  I think there is a small ding or two under the “banana” pipe which is common since it’s the closest part to the ground.  Please keep in mind this is a euro market bike with right side shift and left side brake.  Just to recap on the good and bad. Bad; Seat cover needs attention. a ding or two on bottom side of expansion chamber (banana).  A small ding on left side of tank. The good,  ONLY HAS 1243 ORIGINAL KILOMETERS.

1973 Laverda SF1 Engine

I assume that by “expansion chamber” the seller means “crossover pipe.” I remember when I first discovered these selling, if you could find one, for $4,500. Now they’re double or even triple that. This example features the traditional Laverda orange paint and is claimed to be original. The bike generally looks to be in very good condition, other than the split seat seam, something that could be easily fixed if the new owner wants.

It’s not perfect, but is a pretty darn nice example of a more than forty year old motorcycle, and I’d love to have this in my garage.


1973 Laverda SF1 R Side

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