3

Last of the Breed: 1980 Rickman CRE 1000 Predator

1980 Rickman CRE 1000 Predator R Front

While plenty of Rickman motorcycles have graced this site, this one’s a first for me: a CRE 1000 Predator. Rickman made their name building lightweight, nickel-plated frames to wrap around existing powertrain packages. Their bikes often featured internal oil-passages to eliminate the need for external oil tanks and coolers, saving weight. They exemplify the do-it-yourself spirit of 70’s motorcycling: there’s technically no such thing as a “stock” Rickman, since they were built up individually to customer specs or built by the customers from a kit, generally using donor bikes from Honda, Kawasaki, or Triumph.

1980 Rickman CRE 1000 Predator Fairing

Japanese frame and suspension technology on their streetbikes had largely caught up by the 80’s, pushing companies like Rickman to the side, Rickman continued to make their Predator, a sport-touring machine, up until about 1984 that used a 1000cc Kawasaki engine. Rickman-framed Hondas, Kawasakis, and Triumphs show up for sale fairly regularly, and often at very reasonable prices, considering their performance advantages over the standard Hondas and Kawasakis from which they borrow their running gear.

1980 Rickman CRE 1000 Predator Pegs

From the original eBay listing: 1980 Rickman CRE 1000 Predator

Model year 1980

Super rare model, 2 owners from new The first owner ran the Rickman owners club for many years

Bike has extensive history file, frame was supplied to Maitland Racing who built the bike and supplied a tuned engine. Engine Z1000J motor fitted with a Wiseco 1105 big bore kit, electronic ignition, Goodrich oil cooler, full build sheet & dyno chart included. Dyno’d at 118bhp.

Converted to mono shock and 17″ wheels.

Starts and runs with no smoke or rattles, only known fault is the speedo requires attention currently fitted with a Sigma digital speedo.

Correctly registered (English documents) as Rickman.

Ride and collect! Bulletproof investment.

Bike is currently located in Italy, Roveredo in Piano, but i can get them delivered all around the World at cost, no problem.

1980 Rickman CRE 1000 Predator Rear Suspension

Although the frame is the big story with any Rickman and the key to their success, it’s hard to overlook the striking bodywork that includes a distinctive duck-tail unit and monoshock rear suspension, while 17″ wheels should make for a great selection of grippy high-performance modern rubber.

1980 Rickman CRE 1000 Predator Cockpit

If you’ll notice, the speedo is currently stuck, hence the fitting of the little digital unit. But that shouldn’t really present much of a problem to solve, considering the fact that the unit itself is a stock Kawasaki part. Or just go with an aftermarket gauge: considering the quirky 80’s style of the bodywork, I’m sure no one would mind the fitment of a modern, digital dash.

1980 Rickman CRE 1000 Predator Tail

All-in-all, a very distinctive vintage sportbike you can enjoy on a daily basis, and it doesn’t get much better than that!

-tad

1980 Rickman CRE 1000 Predator L Side

2

If You Have to Ask: 1975 MV Agusta 750S America

1975 MV Agusta 750S America R Front

While many sporting motorcycles from Ducati, Moto Guzzi, Norton, and Triumph sometime featured crude detailing and haphazard fit-and-finish, the MV Agusta 750S America was a premium product with a gorgeous, sand-cast four-cylinder engine at its heart. While four-cylinder engines would eventually be associated with mass-produced “Universal Japanese Motorcycles” in the late 1970’s, MV Agusta’s was a marvel of sophisticated, race engineering. The cams were driven by a straight-cut geartrain that ran between cylinders two and three and the engine is actually narrower than a Honda CB400’s.

1975 MV Agusta 750S America L Front

The America bumped the displacement of the transverse inline four to 787cc and 75hp and, true to its name, the gearshift was on the left and the brake on the right. Unfortunately, it retained the 750S’ heavy shaft drive, although Magni did produce a chain-drive conversion for the bike.

With a 560lb wet weight, the shaft drive, and a very exclusive price tag, this wasn’t a bike for race-track antics. It was a sophisticated, elegant bike for well-heeled fans of MV’s racing heritage and it excelled in that role, as reflected by their value today.

1975 MV Agusta 750S America Tank Detail

From the original eBay listing: 1975 MV Agusta 750S America

Magnificent machine. Sounds, runs and rides awesomely. Truly one of the greatest experiences in classic motorcycles.

This same bike actually featured on CSBFS back in 2012. The racing decals and “elf” logos may not be to everyone’s taste, but I’d expect they’re relatively easy to remove. I’ve seen 750’s with both wire wheels and cast wheels in magnesium or silver, but never with yellow-painted wheels. Red and yellow are a good color combination, although they’re a bit garish on an MV. They may not be to everyone’s taste, and I wonder how they will affect this sale. With a starting bid listed at a shocking $75,000 there are no takers as yet, but with plenty of time left on the auction, I’ll be curious to see if any buyers step up to the plate.

-tad

1975 MV Agusta 750S America R Side

1

Numbers-Matching Twin: 1966 BSA Lightning for Sale

1966 BSA Lightning R Front

Intended as the all-rounder in BSA’s mid-60’s range, the A65 Lightning was sportier than the Thunderbolt and more comfortable than the Spitfire. A natural competitor for Triumph’s Bonneville, owing to similar specification and performance, the Lightning was powered by a 654cc, OHV parallel-twin that put 52hp through a four-speed gearbox and could reach a claimed 112mph.

1966 BSA Lightning Tank

Slightly oversquare dimensions gave the engine a more enthusiastic quality than competing machines from Triumph, but parallel twins are inherently unbalanced and BSA’s engine shook more than most: in an era before balance shafts and other mechanical trickery, severe vibration in the upper rev range would see you breaking headlight filaments with cartoonish regularity.

1966 BSA Lightning Engine Detail

Interestingly, although the distinctive chrome-plating on the tank is very evocative and striking today, BSA’s image at the time was more “reliable and conservative” than rival Triumph.

1966 BSA Lightning Clocks

From the original eBay listing: 1966 BSA Lightning for Sale

Meticulous Ground-Up Restoration by BSA Enthusiast, Thousands in Receipts, New Everything, One Owner 1966-2012, 2500 Original Miles, Matching Numbers

This 66 BSA Lightning is a two owner bike with 2500 original miles. It was ground-up restored over the last three years by a very detail-oriented BSA enthusiast, who bought the bike from the original owner in 2012. The original owner lived in Sleepy Hollow, NY and bought the bike brand new from the dealership on Main Street in sleepy hollow in 1966. He rode it sparingly, lost interest, and stored it in his house until 2012. As a result, the previous owner told me the bike only had 2500 miles on it when he purchased it.

When the previous owner got it, he assessed the bike, started ordering parts, and completely disassembling it down to the frame (pics below.) Since the bike was so original, the idea was to completely rebuild all the mechanicals, while leaving as much of the cosmetics original as possible. The frame did not need to be repainted, so it was left “stove black” with its original paint from the factory. The seat and tank and sidecovers are all original and are in great condition and display a nice even light patina.

The motor was sent out and fully and professionally rebuilt.
The bike was fitted with Mikunis and a Boyer MK4 ignition.
The suspension was completely rebuilt, as well as the wheel bearings, and he added a tapered steering head bearing.
The bike was fitted with new tires, new battery, new fuel taps, it has all new cables, and the tank was sealed.
I have thousands of dollars in receipts for all the work done, as pictured.

The bike was set up to ride, so everything was hit with blue loctite. The stock handlebars were kept, since they are so comfortable to ride with and make the bike easy to wheel around the garage. The bike starts up easily from dead cold on one or two kicks. Remarkably, it doesn’t even leak any oil (and yes, there’s oil in it.)

All the electrics function properly. Because of the new tires and freshly rebuilt suspension, the bike is the best riding Lightning we’ve had. It feels very tight going down the road, loves to corner, and exhibits very little vibration. The new owner put just over 500 indicated miles on the bike since the rebuild and told me he wouldn’t hesitate to ride the bike anywhere. We’ve sold 5 Lightnings in the last year and this one is the most impressive.

With this bike you get excellent preservation-class cosmetics with the security of thousands in receipts that come with the bike that show a total overhaul. The previous owner was very particular about the bike and any conversation I had with him about it seemed to last at least half an hour or more while he went over all the minute technical details of the restoration.

The bike comes with a perfectly preserved original 1966 BSA owner’s manual. It is matching numbers.

1966 BSA Lightning Seat

Take a look at the particularly nice video of the bike riding around its current home in Brooklyn, NY: you can really hear that classic twin snarl.

There are “survivors” with tons of originality and patina. But something like this, a ground-up restoration by experts with minor updates to improve reliability and function is more in line with what I would want in a dream bike. And the bike doesn’t appear to have been “over-restored”: some bits still in excellent condition were even left with their original paint to give the bike a bit of a lived-in feel.

I don’t follow the prices on these, so I wouldn’t hazard a guess as to where that reserve is set. But it’s obvious that, if you’re looking for a really nice Lightning to own and cherish and ride, this is one to watch.

-tad

1966 BSA Lightning L Side

4

Classic Roundcase: 1972 Ducati 750GT for Sale

1972 Ducati 750GT R Side

As always, range-topping sportbikes create a halo-effect and drive showroom traffic but, in the end, it’s lower-spec machines that keep the lights on and put food on the table. The 750SS may have been the sexy poster child for Ducati in the 1970’s, but that bike’s rarity and uncomfortable riding position means that the more mundane 750GT is a less expensive, far more practical proposition.

1972 Ducati 750GT L Front

Sharing frame and basic powertrain with the sportier Sport, the GT was designed as a real-world motorcycle, with relatively comfortable ergonomics. Interestingly, neither the GT nor the Sport actually featured the now universal Desmo heads and made do with regular valve springs. Valve springs, while less sexy in theory, make for easier and less costly maintenance. Luckily, the iconic bevel-drive and tower-shaft arrangement features on all of Ducuati’s “L-twin” engines of the period, so you can still help your mechanic afford that new addition on his home if you don’t like wrenching on bikes yourself.

1972 Ducati 750GT L Side Rear

The early “round case” models like this one command a premium compared to later models with restyled bits. There’s little functional difference between the two, other than the usual evolutionary changes, but the look of the original design is considered much more elegant, and they command higher prices.

1972 Ducati 750GT Dash

From the original eBay listing: 1972 Ducati 750 GT for Sale

Runs and drive great. clean AZ title, 750S751085, engine number 750683. 26246 on odo, but history of actual mileage unclear. steel gas tank professionally lined with caswell. fresh paint, frame just powder coated. new tires. fenders and exhaust rechromed . rear fender has been shortened (I didn’t do it). instrument pod solid, but shows cracks. electronic ignition and everything electrical works, including the charging system. wiring not pretty, could use a new wiring harness. side stand will swing up closer to exhaust, just didn’t move it enough when I put it on the center stand for the pictures. pictures don’t do it justice. the bike is stunning in person.

1972 Ducati 750GT R Side Engine

Plenty of time left on the auction, although there’s no activity so far. The bike is in very nice condition, with fresh paint on the tank and frame, but $18,000 seems like a pretty high starting point for an auction to me, so we’ll see how this progresses as the week unfolds.

-tad

1972 Ducati 750GT L Side

7

Bruiser from Down Under: 1981 Laverda Formula Mirage for Sale

1981 Laverda Formula Mirage R Front

While currently located in New Zealand, this Laverda Formula Mirage has a very American sensibility. In spite of their accents and the fact that they drive on the wrong side of the road, enthusiasts in New Zealand and Australia have more in common with gearheads here in the US than they do with European riders. The wide-open spaces found Down Under lend themselves to the same afflictions that plague us here: big, stupid horsepower and straight-line speed.

1981 Laverda Formula Mirage Controls

Built by Slater Laverda in the UK, masterminds behind the original Jota, the Formula Mirage was powered by Laverda’s famously charismatic and durable three-cylinder engine. It featured a distinctive, one-piece fiberglass tank and seat unit that looked sleek, but significantly limited fuel capacity, which in turn reduced the range of the already thirsty triple. Several folks online also commented on the steeply-sloped seat unit that sees passengers steadily sliding forward into the rider. A bonus on a hot date, not so great if you’re give your buddy a lift to pick up his bike from the mechanic…

1981 Laverda Formula Mirage Dash

From the original, very brief, eBay listing: 1981 Laverda Formula Mirage for Sale

Laverda Formula Mirage, 1 of 14 built by Slaters. Astralites, Goldlines, rebuilt motor . In excellent condition.

Although the seller mentions he believes only 14 were built, I did see mention in a Laverda forum by someone who claimed to have original Slater paperwork that stated 17 were actually created. Either way, it’s a very rare machine, and the parts are all there, even if the sum performs at a somewhat less-than-expected level.

1981 Laverda Formula Mirage Rear Wheel

Overall, in spite of character clearly in line with Laverda’s big, burly image, the bike met with decidedly mixed reviews, likely because the market had moved on, and riders had begun to expect both brawn and brains in their bikes: the “bigger, louder, faster, harder” mentality was just too primitive to appeal.

For collectors looking for a classic Laverda that captures the look and feel of the big, manly motorcycles from Breganze, this could be just the ticket.

-tad

1981 Laverda Formula Mirage L Rear

0

One for the Moto Giro: 1958 MV Agusta 125 Turismo Rapido

1958 MV Agusta 125 Tourismo L Side

While both modern and vintage motorcycle enthusiasts generally associate the name “MV Agusta” with expensive, exotic, competition-oriented motorcycles. But without more affordable, readily-available machinery like this little 125 Tourismo Rapido to plump up the company’s bottom line, much of their famous racing success would have been impossible.

1958 MV Agusta 125 Tourismo Engine Detail

Certainly even when this bike was new, the name MV Agusta was associated with top-tier racing success. But the 125 and 175 models were designed to be sold by the bucketload to help finance those successful exotic machines. These were very popular, due to their quality construction and extremely frugal fuel consumption.

1958 MV Agusta 125 Tourismo L Tank

The bike used a four-stroke engine to add refinement to the package: two-strokes make plenty of power for their weight, but they’re rattle-y, dirty, and generally antisocial. Handling was excellent, even if power was unremarkable: bore and stroke for the overhead valve single were “square” at 54mm each, for a total of 123.6cc that put 6.5hp through a four-speed box.

1958 MV Agusta 125 Tourismo Speedo

From the original eBay listing: 1958 MV Agusta Turismo Rapido

Very rare and hard to find – original vintage MV Agusta – Turismo Rapido 125 cc – Legendary Italian Design at it’s Best. I personally hand selected and purchased this Bike in Germany from a private collector who had the Bike completely restored all to Factory specs in Germany about 9 years ago. No money has been spared not only to restore the Bike but also to preserve history.

At the beginning of the year I decided to display the bike at two well known shows here in Florida, my goal was to find out if the US Judges do have that trained eye needed to appreciate a bike like this one and the precision German craftsmanship going into a Restoration, THEY DID: 

On January 31st. the Bike made 2nd. PLACE – in European Bikes – at the – DANIA BEACH ANTIQUE MOTORCYCLE SHOW – and it made – BEST IN CLASS – at the Prestigious – BOCA RATON CONCOURSE D’ ELEGANCE – on February 22.nd 2015 – They did not skimp on the Trophy either, it is made by TIFFANY & CO. – Both awards goes with the bike, they belong to the bike and they are documented.

The 1958 Year marks the last year of this model and you’ll not find to many in all red. I’ll include some factory pictures that will show the bike with a black / red seat plus I found one factory picture showing the all red seat. In one of the pictures you’ll see Magura – plus a serial Nr. that’s the Manufacturer & nr. engraved in the handle bar, only the original MV Agusta handle bar has that, you’ll not find it in the after market parts.

I would grade the bike a 9 ( from 1 to 10 ) – you’ll find some very minor flaws like a small paint chip here and there and in one picture you’ll see a very minor surface rust spot on the rear rims chrome. There is nothing really that can take anything away from the overall Beauty of this bike. It is already a show winner but this is not just a bike for show you can actually ride this every day. I just changed the Engine Oil.

If you want to come by and check the bike out before you bid on it, that’s very welcome. The bike is so special that I keep it in the living room to my wife’s delight.

1958 MV Agusta 125 Tourismo Rear Suspension

These seem like such fun machines and are far more durable than their exotic nameplate would suggest, since they were originally designed to provide regular transportation with a dash of style. And with 40,000 of them sold during their lifetime, keeping one running shouldn’t be impossible, considering we’re talking about a sixty-year-old motorcycle. This would be a great way to participate in classic events like the Moto Giro, or just make a great weekend ride for puttering around your neighborhood.

-tad

1958 MV Agusta 125 Tourismo L Front

5

Vintage Rider: 1964 Triton for Sale

1964 Triton L Side Rear

It’s interesting that a bastardized hybrid like the Triton could become such an iconic classic motorcycle. It’s an anecdotal observation, but it seems that engine swaps are more acceptable among the motorcycling fraternity than they are in the automotive world. Certainly, there are subcultures of swappers and hot-rodders putting all sorts of engine into cars, regardless of make or model. But they’re looked at a bit askance by more “cultured” enthusiasts… Not so much in the motorcycling world, it seems like. Maybe it’s that motorcycles are easier to work on, more modular. Or maybe it’s that the engines and parts are generally less durable, meaning owners are more likely to have replaced some or all of the original components through attrition…

1964 Triton R Side

The Triton used Triumph’s famous parallel-twin engine and Norton’s justifiably famous “featherbed” frame, combining what was considered to be each bike’s strongest feature and turning them into a high-performance motorcycle: virtually the only custom parts needed to build one were custom engine and transmission mounting plates. Although some established shops built, and continue to build these, many were built in sheds by your average Joe Enthusiast.

1964 Triton L Side Front

Power wasn’t an issue for Norton’s parallel-twin engine, in fact it actually had a bit of an advantage over the Triumph in stock form. But the long-stroke Norton engine was pushing what was considered at the time to be the limits of acceptable piston speed, and the more “square” Triumph engine was more durable by far, and could be easily tuned. The pre-unit construction of both bikes even made it easy to keep the Norton four-speed box that was considered the better choice of the two, although some used the Triumph transmission.

1964 Triton R Side Engine

From the original eBay listing: 1964 Triton for Sale

Good running motorcycle. Its been very reliable and has never given me issues or failed to get me to my destinations. It’s not perfect cosmetically, it’s not a show bike so if that’s what you want then this bike is not for you. Fiberglass tank is solid but paint has some scratches. Fiberglass oil tank is nice, and fiberglass seat is solid but leather cover has some scuffs here and there. The frame is a 1964 Norton Atlas, and powder coated, both front and back fenders are too for that Manx look. Both 19″ Rims and spokes are brand new, laced to a front TLS and rear brake. Avon tires are new too. Forks are rebuilt, new bushings and seals. Swing arm has copper bushings. The ’65 T100R Daytona unit engine has about 3000 miles since rebuilt, converted to single carb. The right side header has a weld due to hairline crack few years ago, it’s been solid since. I consider this bike my daily rider, it’s been garaged these last couple of years. Reason for selling..??.. Now a dad!

This Triton runs very well. The TLS brake does have the backing plate bracket that helps stop this bike well! 

1964 Triton Front Brake

If this were mine, I’d want to source a couple of appropriate Smiths gauges, and I understand that the “twin carburetor” configuration is the hot set-up, but I expect the single carb improves rideability. I’m also not clear on when the bike was originally built: was the recent work a refresh of a vintage Triton build, or was it a more recent conversion? Either way, the seller freely admits this is no show bike, and personally that’s how I like them. These will always need more attention than a modern machine, but it speaks volumes that the seller considers this a “daily rider.”

-tad

1964 Triton R Side Front

2

Champagne Taste, Beer Budget: 1975 Moto Morini 3½ Strada For Sale

1975 Moto Morini Strada L Side

Still the bargain of the vintage Italian biking scene, today’s Moto Morini 3½ Strada needs a bit of cosmetic work, but the price is in the ballpark and is said to run very nicely. With just 344cc’s and two valves per cylinder, you’ll need to make the most of the bike’s prodigious handling capabilities to keep up with bigger bikes on back roads but, like the RD400, these were famous giant-slayers in their day.

1975 Moto Morini Strada R Side Rear

The unconventional 72º v-twin was more compact than a 90º engine, and the smaller displacement meant that vibrations weren’t noticably increased. And while many machines still made do with a four-speed gearbox, the Morini’s six-speed part made sure riders could get the most from the bike’s 35-ish horses. The engine used pushrods to operate its valves, but the camshaft was driven by a toothed rubber belt, and the heads themselves were “Heron”-style, reducing manufacturing costs while allowing nearly 60mpg.

The bike came in two flavors: “Strada” and “Sport,” with the Sport being the sportier of the pair. The Strada came equipped with lower pegs and higher bars and a slightly lower state of tune for the engine.

1975 Moto Morini Strada R Side Engine

Period reviews found very little to complain about, other than the performance-per-dollar when compared to Japanese four-cylinder machines. But the Morini had vastly superior handling and that difficult to quantify Italian style that made it worth the cost then, and a complete bargain now.

1975 Moto Morini Strada Dash

From the original eBay listing: 1975 Moto Morini 3½ Strada for Sale

The bike has been in storage for many years (at least 15 years)  There is a workshop manual with the bike, there are some original tools.  the timing belt was just replaced and there is another new belt and the puller for the flywheel needed to replace the belt, with the bike.

It has a new rear chain. I went through the fuel system.    The bike runs beautifully, it has a 6 speed gearbox.  electrical system is good, system charges, Lights all work. new battery. the tires are very old.

The miles are correct, it is missing the right side tank emblem, there is a dent in the gas tank and some rust at the very rear of the right muffler. ( see pictures)   The alloy ball end is broken off the clutch lever but the bike does not appear to have any road damage

1975 Moto Morini Strada Rear

The $3,450 Buy It Now price seems smack in the middle for Morinis right now. This one has some cosmetic imperfections, including the missing tank badge on one side and the dent along the top, but with such low miles and in running condition, it looks like this will just need a basic tune up and a new set of tires to be ready to go!

1975 Moto Morini Strada Tank Detail

These are uncommon motorcycles that provide a ton of bang for your buck, so if you’re a fan of Italian twins but your budget won’t stretch to a vintage Ducati, grab one of these unintimidating little machines and get ready for the spring riding season!

-tad

1975 Moto Morini Strada R Side Front

4

Tasteful Custom: 1973 Ducati 750GT Café Racer

1973 Ducati 750GT Cafe R Side

Built around an early, very desirable “round-case” L-twin Ducati engine, this bike is based on a 750GT. As such, it does not use Ducati’s desmodromic valvetrain and makes do with simple springs instead. While that may not be as sexy to say as “Desmo”, it means that maintenance will be simplified, although the bevel-drive and tower-shaft arrangement still requires some expertise to set up correctly.

1973 Ducati 750GT Cafe Engine Detail

Although it’s obviously of questionable wisdom to modify such a valuable classic, most of the cosmetic modifications look like they could be easily reversed, if the new owner decides to sell, or decides that they prefer a more original style. It’s also nice to see that the engine build includes VeeTwo parts: they disappeared for a while, but it looks like this Australian company is back in business, making hot-rod parts for bevel and belt-drive Ducatis.

1973 Ducati 750GT Cafe Dash

It’s so easy to screw something like this up, just by adding a splash too much color, or the wrong color. But the builder of this bike went simple silver. Period-correct style or not, I’m not a fan of the “750” decal on the side panels, but that’s easy enough to fix. And that Grimeca front drum looks great, although no Ducati twin I know of ever used a front drum… Otherwise, it’s a very nicely turned-out special.

1973 Ducati 750GT Cafe Front Brake

From the original eBay listing: Custom 1973 Ducati 750GT  

Custom café racer in the spirit of the prototype

I bought this Ducati in 2005 in the current condition with 20,609 miles on the odometer. Previous owner started with a standard 750 GT and had it extensively customized. Here is his description of the work done:

With custom paint, seat, linkage, front brake, clip-ons, side covers, and seat back, this is a one of a kind bike inspired by the prototype. The engine is completely rebuilt with improvements throughout, giving it more power and better response without jeopardizing reliability. The pistons are short skirt sport pistons from V-Two to raise the compression. The heads got lighter 7mm valves with better springs, new seats and guides. From the Carillo rods to the 36mm carbs, to the polished crank to the billet cams to the smaller stem valves, all things were considered with this project.

The bike is one of several classic bikes in my collection and it got regularly used on short trips. Bike runs extremely strong, starts with one or two kicks and is ready to ride. Nice chrome and paint with very few minor scratches.

No manual or tool kit. GA registration in my name. GA did not issue titles for bikes over 25 years old. Also have ex California title assigned to my name.

1973 Ducati 750GT Cafe L Rear

The seller also includes a more comprehensive list of modifications over on eBay, worth a look if you’re curious about this bike. The internal modifications sound like they’ve been well thought-out and the bike is ready to run, no matter what it looks like. Bidding is pretty active on this one, and up to $12,500 with the Reserve Not Met.

-tad

1973 Ducati 750GT Cafe R Side Detail

2

Steve McQueen Tribute: 1964 Triumph TR6C Trophy for Sale

1964 Triumph Trophy R Side

I don’t often write up Triumphs like this TR6C Trophy because, although they’re the very embodiment of vintage motorcycles, they’re also pretty easy to find: Triumph made a boatload of them, and fans have been collecting and restoring them for years. So when I go looking for cool bikes, there’s almost always something weirder or rarer to write about.

But this particular bike caught my eye, painted up in vivid Gulf Racing colors as a nod to famous Triumph owner and racer Steve McQueen. And who doesn’t love that striking color combo?

1964 Triumph Trophy L Side Rear

Built between 1956 and 1973, the TR6 was designed for the North American market and their hunger for larger displacement motorcycles. It was powered by a 649cc version of Triumph’s long-lived parallel twin with iron barrels and, for the first time, a lightweight aluminum cylinder head. Earlier bikes used pre-unit construction, with the engine and four-speed transmission as separate castings, but 1964 saw Triumph’s use of unit construction that stiffened the package and simplified manufacturing.

1964 Triumph Trophy R Side Tank Detail

The “C” model designation in “TR6C” stood for “competition” and referred to the desert racing at which it excelled. In fact, that tiny headlamp was designed to be easily removed at the track, and then replaced for the ride home. Of course, most people who bought these didn’t race them, but that’s always the case with race-inspired style.

1964 Triumph Trophy L Side Tank

From the original eBay listing: 1964 Triumph TR6C Trophy for Sale

Amazing condition throughout. Professionally restored. Nothing on the market this nice!

New custom “Gulf” paint job, complete professional rebuild with powder coated black rims and many extras. (The blue & orange in the pics look darker than what they actually are).  Google Gulf Racing to see actual colors

 These are the team Gulf colors that Steve McQueen used during his sponsored races in 1964 and other years.

All work was done at a reputable Triumph shop with no expense spared.  Chrome swing arms, black powder coated rims, Mikuni carburetors, new chrome parts, new tires, new clutch plates & cables, etc. etc.

This bike performs and runs strong!  

638 Miles on the speedometer, but this was from when it was restored.

This is a masterpiece! Over $12,000 and a lot of time invested.

1964 Triumph Trophy R Side Rear

Although Triumphs usually require more wrenching than your average Japanese or German or even Italian machine, they’re easy to get parts for, simple to work on, and there’s a ton of information available to help keep them running. In addition, Triumphs are the types of machines that are instantly recognizable by bikers and non-bikers alike and inspire smiles wherever you go.

With a $7,200 Buy It Now price, this one isn’t the cheapest you’ll find and is obviously not all-original, but looks to be well done and very striking in blue and orange. I’m curious to see how Triumph fans react to this bike: is the non-original paint combo going to impact offers on this bike? Is it a bit too loud for your average Triumph fan?

-tad

1964 Triumph Trophy L Side

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