0

Help Wanted! Contributors Needed for CSBFS!

Do you love old motorcycles? Do you spend your free time scrounging around eBay and Craigslist to find vintage sportbikes for your fantasy garage? Want to be a more active part of the motorcycle scene and share your opinions with a wider audience?

The ClassicSportBikesForSale.com team is growing and we’re looking for new contributors, enthusiasts who want to share their expertise and opinions with the rest of the community!

No web design or coding skills are required to do this. In fact very little technical skill is required at all. You will need to learn how to use the site’s authoring web interface, but it’s really not much more difficult to use than email.

So if you are someone or know someone who is passionate about classic sport bikes, can string together coherent sentences, and has an interest in joining our team, please submit a sample post via email to dan@motoringblogs.com and let us know how many posts you’re able to contribute on a weekly basis.

If you have some time and a passion for bikes, we’d love to hear from you!

-tad

 

0

Mark One: 1977 Moto Guzzi 850 Le Mans for Sale

1977 Moto Guzzi 850 LeMans L Side

Moto Guzzi’s follow up to their successful V7 Sport was this, the 850 Le Mans, often known these days as the “Mark I Le Mans.” It used a hot-rod version of their earlier longitudinally-mounted v-twin engine, with bigger, high-compression pistons, bigger valves, high performance carburetors, cast-aluminum wheels, and a more modern, very chunky look that would set the tone for Guzzis through the 1980s. The style is really hard to pin down to a particular era, with the jutting cylinders and minimal style looking like something very 60s or 70s while the angular bodywork has more of a 1980s style.

1977 Moto Guzzi 850 LeMans L Side Front

The hot-rod engine put out 71hp at the rear wheel and made for a genuine 130mph, which wasn’t top-of-the-class but very competitive during the period. But unlike the equally fast but fiddly-to-maintain Ducati 900SS or the wobbly-handling and under-braked Kawasaki Z900, the Le Mans offered up Guzzi’s classic recipe of durable shaft-drive, stable handling, and midrange grunt. And Guzzi was forward-thinking in terms of safety as well: the Le Mans featured their simple but effective linked braking system that was used up until the 1990s. The front brake lever operated one front caliper, while the foot pedal used a proportioning valve to distribute power between the second front and the rear caliper. The Le Mans is definitely an acquired taste, with the noticeable shaft-drive effect, but is a very rewarding bike to own.

1977 Moto Guzzi 850 LeMans Dash

From the original eBay listing: 1977 Moto Guzzi 850 Le Mans for Sale

I have had the pleasure of owning this bike for the past 15 years.
Upgrades:
  • Lafranconi competizione mufflers
  • Koni rear shocks
  • Progressive front springs
  • Gaman seat
  • Torozzi rear sets
  • Harpers outsider kit with deep sump
  • Braided brake lines
  • gaskets, bushings and rubber
  • K&N filters
  • Frame up paint in 2003 – held up well
  • documentation of work done
This bike runs and looks great! It handles likes it on rails, brakes with the best of them and has tremendous acceleration and power. Time for someone new to enjoy this fine machine.

1977 Moto Guzzi 850 LeMans L Side Engine

Bidding is up to $10,000 which, frankly, seems to be on the low side for these. I can remember when, just a few years ago, they were selling for about half that… Happily, the bike even features the European-style bikini fairing with the flush-mount headlamp. American units had an ugly, jutting unit that projected out beyond the curve of the fairing, looking more like a train headlight than something that belongs on a sleek sportbike. If you’ve never noticed how ugly the American version is, I apologize in advance: its’ one of things that, once seen, can never be unseen… This may not be the original part, however, since most I’ve seen feature a bright orange vertical “safety stripe” for improved visibility. Not sure how effective it is, but it does look cool. The stepped seat is also a non-standard item, which is no surprise since the closed-cell foam originals rarely survive.

-tad

1977 Moto Guzzi 850 LeMans R Side

 

1

Radical Racebike: 1975 Bimota YB1 350GP for Sale

1975 Bimota YB1 L Side

The Bimota YB1 wasn’t originally called the YB1 because it predated Bimota’s traditional naming conventions. Internally, it was known as the Yamaha-Bimota Gran Prix ’74, but later became known as the YB1, the very first Yamaha-engined Bimota. In fact, it was the very first series-production Bimota, if something built in numbers this small can be considered “production.” Powered by either the 250cc or 350cc version of the TZ’s liquid-cooled parallel-twin engine, just twelve of these distinctive and very fast little machines were built.

1975 Bimota YB1 R Side Naked

The bike’s racing success helped pave the way for Bimota’s later, more well-known racing and road bikes and helped to establish BiMoTa as a manufacturer. It’s quite literally possible that, without the YB1, there’d be no Bimota today at all and the face of motorcycling might look very different.

1975 Bimota YB1 R Side Front

Built between 1974 and 1975, the bike included Bimota’s signature racing touches: one-piece bodywork that allowed easy maintenance, a stiff and lightweight tubular frame, adjustable ergonomics, and even a clever eccentric chain adjuster.

1975 Bimota YB1 Tank

From the original eBay listing: 1975 Bimota YB1 350GP for Sale

VIN 12

This is an iconic superare YB1, the first race Bimota with Yamaha TZ competition engine. It was also the second Bimota race model ever built (the first was the unique Paton Bimota) and definitely the first “true” racing Bimota as this model was raced by important names as Lucchinelli, Riondato, Ceccotto, Gallina, etc. This frame was built to be fitted with both Yamaha options 250cc and 350cc, this one is a 350cc. Only 12 units were built making this model extremely rare, desiderable and collectable.

This bike was last paraded at the main Italian event in 2012, kept in collection completely dry since. The paddock stand in pics is coming with the bike.

Race, parade and collect!

1975 Bimota YB1 Engine

Another one from our new best friend “Gianluca” who always seems to have the very coolest bikes for sale! Bidding is up to just $4,550 with the reserve not met and several days left on the auction. I honestly don’t know what this little exotic really should be worth, but it’s one of just twelve built, looks wild, and as an early Bimota is certainly historically significant. The YB1 was available as a kit bike, and supposedly very few were sold with this distinctive bodywork, making this zero-mileage example even more of a unicorn, literally ground zero for the modern sportbike.

-tad

1975 Bimota YB1 R Side

1

Mean, Green, and Canadian: 1984 Kawasaki KZ1100R ELR for Sale

1984 Kawasaki KZ1100R R Front

Big, brash, and charismatic, big superbike replicas like the KZ1100R put paid to the stereotype that a UJM is doomed to be some sort of boring appliance. Sure, the “Universal Japanese Motorcycle” does sound a bit familiar and unexciting, but the formula flat works. Based on the garden-variety KZ1000J, the original KZ1000R displaced less than that bike’s 105cc, down to 998cc to make it eligible for racing and it featured general updates to the already venerable air-cooled inline four aimed at increasing power and keeping the bike’s reliable reputation intact. But engine updates alone don’t a sportbike make and, although the R was heavy, revised frame geometry gave the bike the agility needed. The K1100R was an update to the original bike, with a bigger 1089cc engine.

1984 Kawasaki KZ1100R L Rear

So what about this whole “ELR” thing? Well this lurid green monster was a race replica meant to celebrate the successes for Eddie Lawson, rider for Kawasaki and successful AMA Superbike competitor. The original K1000R was the real-deal Eddie Lawson Replica and, although the K1100R certainly looks the part, purists often seem to consider it less desirable.

1984 Kawasaki KZ1100R Tank

From the original eBay listing: 1983 Kawasaki KZ1100R for Sale

Second owner, 1984 Kawasaki Eddie Lawson superbike replica KZ1100R with 20,000km (13,000 miles). Canadian model. Bike starts, runs, and drives excellent. Needs nothing except a new home. original bike color changed from Stardust Blue to Green last year. Top quality paint work with 6 coats of clear and a new decal kit from England. Inside of tank was professionally recoated and guaranteed for life. Every other part on this bike was powdercoated other than the frame and engine. Engine is completely stock and has not been worked on or modified (other than valve cover gasket). Updated brake lines front and back. These beautiful bikes are getting more rare every day. Original owners manual and tool kit included as well as spare keys. Kerker purchased last year. Clean and clear title in hand. All original parts included with sale (I have spent years collecting hard to find parts). See list below for all extras included with sale. 

Extras included:

  • New front tire
  • Set of working carbs
  • OEM front fender (new paint as well)
  • Shop manual
  • Gasket kit
  • Fuel petcock complete
  • OEM crash guards
  • OEM airbox and filter
  • OEM intake boots
  • Spare chain guard
  • OEM decals
  • Decals, cables, and hardware

1984 Kawasaki KZ1100R L Tank

The starting bid is $10,000 with no takers yet and very little time left on the auction. This second generation machine represents and evolution of the original KZ1000R Eddie Lawson Replica but was built in greater numbers and is generally considered less desirable. The price is on the high side, but I wonder if the color change is affecting the bidding as well: even a really good paint job isn’t likely to be as desirable as the original paint in good condition and, no matter how high the quality, a change of color definitely has an impact on values. I prefer the green as well but, if the seller was concerned about maintaining the bike’s long-term value, I’d have suggested he keep it original.

Also, the bike’s in Calgary, Canada so that may be turning folks off buyers here in the US as well.

-tad

1984 Kawasaki KZ1100R R Rear

1

Restored to Perfection: 1975 BMW R90S for Sale

1975 BMW R90S L Front

Today’s BMW R90S is the quintessential German sportbike: fast, stable, and reliable, but just a little bit uptight and unassuming. Or it would be unassuming, if not for that very vivid 70s paint job… By the 1970s, a major shift was well underway in the motorcycling world. Postwar shortages in many markets meant that, throughout the period immediately following World War II, cars were simply too expensive for many people to afford and motorcycles were often used as basic transportation in their place. But by the 1960s, the tide had begun to change and, more and more, motorcycles were seen as luxury items or toys, especially here in the US.

1975 BMW R90S R Rear

Generally stodgy image aside, BMWs had always been involved in racing but, by the 1970s, they felt they needed reach customers outside the lucrative, but steadily aging “old man” demographic. BMW’s traditional customers were aging out, and BMW wanted to reach out to a new crop of riders who were looking for something like a Ducati, but maybe with some comfort thrown in. The Germans may have been trying to create their own SuperSport with the R90S, but that practical Teutonic DNA comes through pretty strongly in both the form and the function.

1975 BMW R90S Dash

That dose of practicality in no way diminishes the performance available and the bike was very competitive in AMA racing immediately after it was introduced. High-compression pistons and performance carburetors meant that the proven pushrod engine, here bumped to 898cc, made 67 very flexible horses that could take the R90S all the way to 125mph, although braking power was never much to write home about.

1975 BMW R90S L Rear

Today’s example looks terrific and appears to be quite the labor of love. From the original eBay listing: 1975 BMW R90S for Sale

This is a perfect restored numbers-matching BMW R90S. Many collectors like a bike in original condition unrestored. This is perfect for somebody who put it in his man cave and enjoy looking at the bike or showing it to somebody. But after 40 years it would not be fun to drive it. All the rubber, bowden and seals and much more thinks getting dry brittle leaking and brake. This one is ready to drive and it is as new as it can be.

I am a 60 year old German engineer and be working on BMW’s my whole life as my hobby and for fun. I am selling this one because I have too many toys and I am downsizing for my retirement. This one is restored to perfection. Look at all the pictures it tells the story. I was working over 2 years on this bike and one thing lead in to another because as a perfectionist nothing is good enough.

Here is a list of what I have done. I am sure this list is not complete but you getting the idea:

  • Frame powder coated.
  • Wheels polished hubs bead blasted new stainless spokes.
  • Every screw on the bike is new and stainless.
  • All the rubber and I mean all what has any rubber in it or on it is new tires, seals, bowden, seat, footpegs and so on.
  • Wheel bearings and brakes are new
  • Every aluminum part on engine, gearbox and final drive is bead-blasted and assembled with new seals
  • Cylinder heads with lead-free valves
  • New pistons and oil rings
  • New clutch complete with spring plate
  • Carbs are overhauled and sealed for over $500
  • New seat complete with pan from Germany
  • Instrument cluster overhauled for over $600 and set to 0 miles
  • This was a low millage bike to begin with and in a very good shape
  • New paint and pin striped by a pro for over $2000.
  • New petcocks and fuel cap.
  • New exhaust system complete.
  • And so on…
  • It comes with the original toolkit, shop rag, metal air pump and manual
  • And I have a box full of receipts what I be afraid off to add up.
  • There is a lot of money in this bike.

1975 BMW R90S Parts

Bidding is very active on this bike and already north of $12,000, with plenty of time still left on the auction and the Reserve Not Met. That’s certainly premium money for an old BMW, but it sounds like you’re getting about as close to a brand-new R90S as is possible, barring a lifetime of tracking down NOS parts and building one from scratch. Certainly, the seller makes a great point: an unrestored, barn-find bike would likely require a ton of work to make it run correctly, or would require constant attention as the little bits mentioned deteriorate and fail. This bike is virtually perfect and ready-to-roll. If you have the cash to spend and want an R90S, this looks like a good choice!

-tad

1975 BMW R90S R Side

1

Sparkly Two-Stroke Terror: 1974 Kawasaki H1 500 Mach III for Sale

1974 Kawasaki H1 500 R Front

In the early 1970s, Kawasaki’s two-stroke triples like this H1 500 Mach III ruled the quarter-mile drag strips here in America. 60hp and a 115mph top speed may not sound like that much, but they were fairly light and lacked any of the modern electronic trickery designed to keep riders [mostly] on two wheels and away from the hedges, ditches, and telephone poles that seem to leap out of nowhere. Those horses also came on in a brutal, two-stroke rush that had the front wheel pointed skyward in an eyeblink, while sometimes unpredictable handling and a feeble front brake meant corners and stopping were best planned far in advance, a real challenge when the horizon was a simple flick of the wrist away.

Although the handling may have been primitive, the two-stroke triple and five speed gearbox that drove the beast was powerful, relatively reliable, and the perfect tool for tearing up the straight-line racetracks here in the USA, where they sold like hotcakes, since the scary cornering performance, dismal fuel consumption, and inadequate brakes barely mattered for most riders.

1974 Kawasaki H1 500 L Rear

The upside to the handling faults of many period motorcycle is that it allowed a whole cottage industry of frame-builders and tuners to exist: without bikes like the H1, we’d have no Bimota, and the world would be a sadder, emptier place. But the real question to me is why, since frame-builders of note had been around since the 1960s, didn’t Japanese manufacturers simply contract them to provide improvements? Especially since the issues that affected the H1 are relatively straightforward: frames lacking in stiffness, spindly forks that flexed, and primitive shocks. It’d be simple to dismiss those flaws as acceptable limitations for production-based motorcycles, but many racebikes of the period seem to have been similarly afflicted, so it seems like a pool of knowledge wasn’t being exploited.

1974 Kawasaki H1 500 R Rear

The H1 500 Mach III and the H2 750 Mach IV were both notoriously dangerous bikes that required skill and daring to ride quickly, although the H2 was significantly improved in terms of handling, a good thing considering the additional 50% in displacement… Interestingly, while the H2 was introduced after the H1, it was sold alongside its older, hairier brother for several years. Bidding for this example is just north of $4,000 and far short of the $7,500 Buy It Now price, although there’s plenty of time left on the auction.

From the original eBay listing: 1974 Kawasaki H1 500 Triple for Sale

Completely restored less than a year ago!
VIN BL353836
Open MA title
7806 miles
Dual disc front end braided steel lines
Rebuilt engine, less than 1000 miles ago
Powder-coated frame and wheels
Denco pipes
Custom Pearl Paint with candy color
Stainless spokes, powder-coated rims, extra chrome
Three small dents in rear of front fender (cannot be seen).
Runs and sounds awesome!

H1 and H2 prices have seen a dramatic increase in recent years, although values do seem to have leveled off a bit recently. That may be due to the fact that these were made in volume and, although pristine ones are pretty rare, it’s not all that hard to find a decent H1 if you want one. Although the seller claims that the bike has been “restored,” it’s important to remember that term does seem to mean different things to different people… This bike has obviously not been restored to some sort of “as-new” standard: the original bikes certainly didn’t have the painted triple clamps, the headlight ring is blacked out, the dash appears to have been painted, and the gauge faces are pretty faded.

1974 Kawasaki H1 500 Dash

That being said, the Denco pipes and the dual disc front end are certainly desirable updates, and the bike is very clean and shiny, with bright brightwork and chrome-y chrome. The paint, while not original, is definitely appropriate for a Kawasaki and, overall, this bike is more “resto-modded” and less “restored.” So while this bike may not be a good choice for collectors who prize originality, it might make a great bike for someone looking for a bike to ride, as long as the seller recognizes that the bike should command a lower price than a concourse-quality restoration when considering offers.

-tad

1974 Kawasaki H1 500 L Front

0

Black Gold: 1978 Ducati 900SS for Sale

1978 Ducati 900SS R Side Front

While I appreciate modern design and efficiency, there’s something so timeless about Ducati’s 900 SuperSport, especially in black with gold pinstripes as seen here. Sure, the silver and blue might more strongly evoke Ducati’s improbable Imola victory, but the black bikes just look so elegant and sinister…

1978 Ducati 900SS R Side Engine

Although far more common than the original, 750cc SuperSport that was intended to commemorate Ducati’s 1972 Imola win, the updated 900SS featured improved performance and general refinements intended to appeal to a broader market. The shifter was revised to more easily allow the bike to use a left-side gearchange, something that was important for customers in the USA. Cast-aluminum wheels replaced the earlier spoked items and the bike also used the updated “square-case” engine that was bumped to 864cc and designed to match the angular, Giugiaro-styled 860GT.

1978 Ducati 900SS Cockpit

From the original eBay listing: 1978 Ducati 900SS for Sale

For Sale is this Beautiful very rare Black/Gold 1978 Ducati 900SS. This bike runs fantastic, engine’s strong and sounds fantastic. The transmission shifts smooth in all gears, there is no issues. Can not confirm speedometer mileage. Fairing and side covers are aftermarket, the Gustafsson windscreen NOS without cracks or scratches. 

Small paint chip on rear fender and there’s a small hairline crack on fairing near mount screw (see photos). Cowl compartment and seat zipper is in excellent working condition. Campagnolo 5 spoke wheels are Gorgeous. New Dellorto’s PHM 40’s, Tommaselli throttle and adjustable clip-ons, Aprilia headlight bezel with Jute light. Brake systems operate great.

Overall this bike is gorgeous.

The Kentucky title’s clear, in hand and in my name.

Frame number 87593

Engine number 87853

 Included with bike is a new wiring harness purchased from Bevelheaven supplied by oldracingspareparts in Italy. Original wiring harness is rough but the headlight, running light and switches operate, both brake light switches work.

This bike is being SOLD-AS-IS, there is NO WARRANTY. Buyer is responsible for all shipping costs and arrangements. Bike is located in Louisville Ky 40219 when checking shipping costs. The bike is being advertised for sale locally, I reserve the right to end this auction at any time.

1978 Ducati 900SS L Detail

The seller also includes a video that can be found here. From the description, it sounds like this is a very clean, very solid-running motorcycle that’s just a few very minor cosmetic blemishes away from being a “10” although that new wiring harness might be worth installing, just for peace of mind…

The Buy It Now price is set at $35,400 which seems pretty high for a 900SS. And with very little interest in the listing so far, other than looky-loos, it appears that I’m not the only one who thinks the price is a bit unrealistic…

-tad

1978 Ducati 900SS R Side

2

Origin of the Species: 1973 Yamaha TZ750 Prototype Road Racer #001

1973 Yamaha TZ750 L Side Front

The second of three very rare Yamaha TZ750 race bikes available this past week, this 1973 model is claimed to be a rare prototype machine. Fans of both ClassicSportBikesforSale.com and RareSportBikesforSale.com have proclaimed all three of these machines to be overpriced, but you can’t argue that they are very cool and very valuable motorcycles regardless of their asking prices. Yamaha’s TZ750 was all brawn and no brains, a power-mad beast of a bike that packed 140hp into a sub-400lb package good for 185mph, with basically terrifying handling when it was introduced. But that power came with reliability, and the TZ dominated AMA racing for years in spite of its lethally bad manners.

1973 Yamaha TZ750 L Side Engine3

This example is supposedly a “prototype” numbered #001, although I’d definitely want to consult with a TZ750 expert before plunking down my hard-earned cash. It’s certainly in impressive cosmetic condition and will undoubtedly look amazing on display. Early TZ’s used a twin-shock rear suspension as seen here, although later bikes moved on to a more modern monoshock set up that vastly improved handling from “scary” to “less scary” as the bike struggled to cope with increased power from the significantly revised powerplant that went from 700cc’s in early bikes to the full 750cc’s in the name.

1973 Yamaha TZ750 Bare Engine

From the original eBay listing: 1973 Yamaha TZ750 Prototype #001 for Sale

This is the rare only one built by the Yamaha Race department. It was finished in 1973 for Kel Caruthers to inspect and make final changes for the completion of the production TZ700/750 for release in 1974 for Daytona and European distribution.

What you see are some of the salvaged parts that were intercepted on the way to the crusher and torch. The main part being the frame and swing-arm stamped 409-100001.

This bike remained in the hands of factory rider Sadeo Asami until it was returned to Yamaha USA in the late 70`s. 

I sat in storage until 2012 when I was able to purchase the parts. A good friend and I spent 3 years bringing it back to as last race condition and another year to where it is now.

This is the bike that changed racing history.

1973 Yamaha TZ750 L Side Engine2

I would be curious, and I’m sure the seller can tell you, whether or not it runs. From the description, it sounds as if it does. This would obviously make a beautiful display piece and centerpiece to a collection, but racing machines I feel should always be kept in running condition, even if it’s only for parade laps and demonstrations. The Buy It Now price is set at $78,000 which, as stated previously, is very high for a TZ750. They’re pretty rare, but 600 were made and, even accounting for the attrition that naturally occurs during racing, it’s possible to find these regularly circling tracks in vintage racing events.

Regardless, I’m happy to see the bike offered up for sale, so we can all drool over it and think about how many extra kidneys we’d need to grow in order to be able to afford it….

-tad

1973 Yamaha TZ750 L Side

2

Bee Sting: 1975 Yamaha TZ750B for Sale

1975 Yamaha TZ750 L Front2

Looking like the world’s angriest bumble bee, complete with four stingers, this Yamaha TZ750B race bike is ready for a new life, terrorizing tracks in vintage racing classes. And “terror” is probably the right word: with as much as 140hp, the TZ750 was very fast and exceptionally reliable, although the concept of handling was still in its infancy and a “good-handling bike” was any motorcycle that exhibited cornering or straight-line behavior that didn’t involve a terminal death-wobble.

Early TZ750s may not have qualified…

1975 Yamaha TZ750 R Naked

The earliest liquid-cooled two-stroke fours look suspiciously like they were built up from a pair of 347cc parallel-twins to make the TZ700. The later 750cc engine that debuted in 1975 supposedly shared no parts at all with the smaller machines and was essentially a bored-out 500 Grand Prix engine. Power predictably overwhelmed the bike’s rudimentary handling and primitive tires. Early machines used a twin-shock rear, although the frames were eventually updated to a more modern monoshock design as seen here: this particular bike was obviously ahead of its time and uses a rare Kanemoto frame, according to the seller.

1975 Yamaha TZ750 L RearFrom the original eBay listing: 1975 Yamaha TZ750B for Sale

Show Winner – Fresh Rebuild – Race Ready. Very Unique Early TZ750; C&J Mono-Shock Frame equipped, Raced in the 1976 and 1977 Daytona 200!

C&J made 4 special TZ750 mono-shock frames for Erv Kanemoto in the mid 1970`s. They were ridden by Gary Nixon, Freddie Spencer, and Gary Fisher. This particular unnumbered chassis was built using a 1975 TZ750B donor bike, and made it into the hands of AMA Pro rider Cory Ruppelt; he finished in the money in the 1976 Daytona 200 Roadrace on this bike.

Original period equipment includes: Morris Magnesium wheels, Lockheed front calipers, early Vesco fairing, and silenced crossover chambers. 
Modern KR series Dunlop racing tires, D.I.D. endless chain, and Boysen reeds make it track-worthy.

Rebuilt motor has 1 hour track time; tear-down inspection just completed. Un-numbered cases. Genuine TZ750D Master Cylinder just installed – carbs, ignition, controls, forks and C&J modified bodywork are original TZ. The bike is near exactly as raced in the 1970’s including paint. Has been preserved for 30 years on display before being brought back to a rider. Unrestored from the 1970’s, in “as-raced” condition.

The seller also includes some on-track video of the bike doing some parade laps here.

1975 Yamaha TZ750 L Rear Naked

Many classic racebikes are non-running display pieces with too much history for the owners to risk a crash, or because they cannot afford the upkeep on a rare, non-production machine more than forty years old. Luckily, this particular bike comes with period looks, unrestored paint, and a refreshed motor that looks like it’s ready to rock.

-tad

1975 Yamaha TZ750 R Front

5

Barely Legal Moto-Porn: 1972 Harley Davidson XR750 for Sale

1972 Harley Davidson XR750 R Side Front

We don’t normally get to feature Harley Davidsons on this site because The Motor Company really didn’t make many bikes you would normally categorize as “sport bikes,” and the ones they did build are extremely rare. Although the Harley Davidson XR750 was originally intended as a flat-track racer, today’s example has been reborn with roadgoing equipment and I’ve decided it qualifies, since it’s supposedly powered by an ex-racing engine and I bet it could would eat most of its roadgoing rivals from Triumph or Norton for lunch.

1972 Harley Davidson XR750 L Side Rear

The race-ready XR750 is considered one of the most successful racing motorcycles ever, winning 29 of 37 AMA Grand National Titles between 1972 and 2008. Yeah, you read that correctly: the XR750 was competitive in flat-track racing for over 30 years. It was powered by a 748cc pushrod v-twin with aluminum heads from 1972 on that improved cooling, compared to the earlier iron heads. Certainly that engine featured primitive architecture, and yeah, it was only competitive considering the specific ruleset that governs flat-track racing. But let’s be real here: all racing is governed by rules that artificially limit development to help keep performance of competing machines somewhat comparable, so that in no way diminishes that impressive record of wins.

1972 Harley Davidson XR750 L Side Engine

Today’s machine is claimed to have a genuine racing engine with some very impressive history slotted into the frame. Although it was originally a race-only machine, this XR750 has been fitted with lights and a license plate, meaning it might just be road-legal where you live…

From the original eBay listing: 1972 Harley Davidson XR750 for Sale

Surprisingly well preserved Harley XR750 flat track bike with 1972 engine.

Street legal in most states, and WITH TITLE! MATCHING NUMBERS on both engine and frame!

This particular bike’s engine is reported to have been ridden in 1972-73 by Cal Rayborn, Mert Lawwill and Scott Brelsford. Harley racing royalty then and now. Of all years of HARLEY XR750, 1972 is probably the hardest to find, since they were very popular, in short supply, and were either used up or supplanted by later year engines with more power.

This bike does not have an odometer or a speedometer, so I have no ideas how many miles it has run.

1972 Harley Davidson XR750 Rear Suspension

What kind of flat tracker has dual front brakes? Or any front brakes, for that matter?! Well whatever the engine and frame’s original provenance, they’re part of a bike with roadgoing intent now, and the stopping power afforded by those dual calipers will be much appreciated, considering the potential speed on tap.

The Buy It Now price is listed as $29,495.00 with very little time left on the auction. That’s a great deal of money for a motorcycle, but considering that XR750’s don’t usually offer you the opportunity to terrorize your neighborhood, it’s really like you’re getting two bikes in one!

-tad

1972 Harley Davidson XR750 R Side

Pages ... 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11