Build your own Triton

A couple of days ago I pointed out this Great Triton offered up on eBay. Well like everyone else I started to think about how I could build myself a Triton. And looks like they have all the makings available on eBay right now.

The frame comes as part of this complete 1967 Norton Atlas project. The seller tells it like it is.

 This is a nice project for someone. 1968 Norton Atlas motorcycle . The bike rolls. The engine turns over and has compression, and the tranny shifts through the gears.It’s mostly complete. speedometer is missing. It appears to me that it was a runner when it was parked. This was in an indoor garage from a collection in private storage since the 1980’s.  I don’t see any significant crash damage on it. Brakes are drums. Engine number is 20/ 118345. frame # is 20/118370 .  Great candidate for an easy restoration. Feel free to ask any questions you have.

The Atlas frame was the world beating Featherbed frame which was such a dominate force, Norton was able to be competitive with a single cylinder engine that was originally designed in the 1920’s, through the 1960’s.

 

 

The engine comes from a different project, a 1967 Triumph Bonneville, but in much the same condition as the roller Norton. This is a Unit Engine and will be a little different build from the traditional Pre-Unit build, but there are resources out there to help you.

From the seller.

Here is a complete 1967 Triumph T120TT engine, along with a matching-number-but-seriously-chopperized frame and a Pennsylvania title with an issue. I shouldn’t have to tell you about the rarity and desirability of the TT model… the engine. As you can see in the pics, it’s not the prettiest thing. Back in the day (about 1970), the cases and head were painted black and all the covers chromed during the building of a fancy chopper. All that fanciness has deteriorated to the point that refinishing is in order.

Lets not kid ourselves. Restoring one motorcycle is time consuming, money consuming, space consuming, and soul consuming. Restoring two motorcycles  will also be a puzzle which will need twice as much research as  one motorcycle. But as you have seen with the end result, what a bike you would have in the end. Oh and all the extra parts that you can resell to fund your build. BB

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1 Response

  1. moscowsteve says:

    Nice post. I hope you inspired someone to build this bike. The “bike you would have in the end” is a work of art.