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1978 Moto Guzzi 850 LeMans 1

This 1978 Moto Guzzi LeMans 1 may be from Italy, but there is something about the Red and Black combination which makes it more then just an Italian bike. It looks tougher, more rough and ready to rumble. Not something you think of when you think of Italians.

$T2eC16RHJHkFFmN1FZLKBSKBeuguOQ~~60_3

From the seller

As the saying goes, “the bike is only original once!”
GOOD LUCK EVER FINDING A LEMANS 1 THIS ORIGINAL AGAIN!
I PURCHASED THIS BIKE IN JULY 1978 IN LOS ANGELES WITH 3,000 MILES FROM THE ORIGINAL OWNER (A CALIFORNIA HIGHWAY PATROLMAN WHO WAS HOT TO GET THE NEW 1978 SUZUKI GS1000 SUPERBIKE)
THIS BIKE HAS COMPLETELY ORIGINAL PAINT (FRAME, PLASTICS, RED TANK, EMBLEMS ETC)
OTHER THAN THE FOLLOWING:
The black paint on the top and bottom of the tank is new due to old tank bag wear marks, ORIGINAL RED PAINT IS PERFECT!
The Orange of the front faring has been painted black as well as the inside
THE ORIGINAL OWNER DID THE FOLLOWING:
The alternator and valve covers have been painted a textured semigloss black
There is black pin stripeing on the wheels (very hard to notice)
There is some red detailing on some of the brake banjo bolts and rotor bolts

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First offered in 1976 the Le Mans Mark I did not get its moniker until 1980 when the Mark II came out, but was know at the factory as the 850 Le Mans. The first generation was broken up into series 1 with a rounder tail light, and this apparent series 2 with a square tail light. 71bhp delivered from the Mark I engine would deliver the rider and bike at about 130mph, a factory café racer which did the job.

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This 1978 Moto Guzzi Le Mans 1 is offered up by its long time owner. Check out the auction for more pictures an a little more description of what to expect when it rolls of the transport into your garage. BB

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$T2eC16FHJHYFFjz5!jM+BSKBfr2g9!~~60_3

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1986 Moto Guzzi V65 Lario for Sale

1986 Moto Guzzi V65 R Front

This one’s on the edge of acceptably “classic”, but it’s an interesting bike and pretty rare.  It was also my riding buddy’s first bike: no Suzuki GS500E for him!  No, he had to have something Italian, a nice Moto Guzzi V65 Lario that I had to drive all the way to Washington DC to pick up for him…

1986 Moto Guzzi V65 L Rear

The V50 that preceded it was sweet-handling but underpowered.  A bump in displacement didn’t help much on its own and, to my knowledge, we didn’t get those in the US anyway.  The V65 Lario hoped to address this lack of performance with an update from two to four valves per cylinder.  Unfortunately, lubrication was not increased to handle the additional moving parts, and failures resulted.

Although these are very likely to have been fixed under warranty by now, you might want to pop the valve cover off one of the heads, just to be sure.  Black-finished cam followers will indicate the work has been performed.

1986 Moto Guzzi V65 Dash

The move to four valves had just the effect you’d expect: little change at low rpm, and better breathing as the revs piled on.  The bike could reach almost 115mph, not a bad figure for a 650cc twin.  Unfortunately, the 16″ wheels on Guzzi’s of this era were a bit of a fashion statement, as the frames were not really engineered with geometry to flatter this tire: handling was universally twitchy and the bikes had a tendency to stand up under braking, characteristics at odds with traditional Guzzi stability.

From the original, naturally all-capital eBay listing: 1986 Moto Guzzi V65 Lario for Sale

1986 MOTO GUZZI V65 LARIO, BIKE IS IN OVERALL NICE CONDITION, 21,131 MILES, THESE ARE RARE BIKES AND DON’T COME UP FOR AUCTION OFTEN. I PURCHASED THE BIKE FROM THE SECOND OWNER WHO HAD IT FOR THE LAST 22 YEARS,AND WAS ALWAYS DEALER MAINTAINED,, BIKE SAT FOR THE LAST 5 YEARS IN A HEATED WAREHOUSE, SINCE I PURCHASED THE BIKE I HAVE GONE THROUGH THE CARBS ,INSTALLED A NEW BATTERY,CLUTCH, FLYWHEEL AND STARTER, BIKE RUNS GOOD, SHIFTS GREAT , BRAKES ARE GOOD AND THE LIGHTS WORK,,,BIKE IS LIGHT AND NIMBLE AND IS A BLAST TO RIDE… MILEAGE WILL CONTINUE TO INCREASE AS I DO RIDE THIS BIKE..IT ALSO HAS DYNA COILS AND IGNITION,ACCEL 8.8 PLUG WIRES AND K&N AIR FILTERS, THERE ARE A FEW BUMPS AND BRUISES ON THE PAINT AND PAINT PEELED ON FRONT FENDER, BUT PRESENTS VERY WELL AND GETS LOTS OF COMPLIMENTS..THE CENTER STAND HAS A SMALL PIECE MISSING AS SEEN IN PICTURE, TIRES ARE ABOUT 75% NEUTRAL LIGHT IS NOT WORKING,INSIDE OF TANK HAS NO RUST, BUT THERE IS SOME RESIDUE FOM OLD FUEL,I INSTALLED INLINE FILTERS AND IT SEEM TO BE GETTING CLEANER EVERY TANK OF FUEL I RUN THROUGH IT..ALSO I WOULD RECOMMEND A NEW GAS CAP,,,PLEASE LOOK AT PICTURES CLOSELY AND ASK ANY QUESTIONS YOU MAY HAVE, THANKS AND GOOD LUCK BIDDING..

The seller has also helpfully posted a video of the bike running: 1986 Moto Guzzi V65 Lario Start Up and Walk Around

The V65 Lario came fairly late in the production-cycle of these smaller twins.  Despite a familial style and configuration, they shared few parts with their bigger brethren, so be careful assuming parts availability will rival the larger Guzzis.  But take idiosyncratic handling into account and ride your sweet little Guzzi on a Sunday afternoon.  Be happy your friend didn’t lose the really cool key these Guzzi’s came with.  Watch the revs build on that gorgeous, white-faced Veglia tachometer and smile.  You certainly won’t see yourself around every corner, and the styling of these 80′s machines is finally starting to be appreciated.

-tad

1986 Moto Guzzi V65 L Side

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1981 Moto Guzzi Monza for Sale with 99 Original Miles?!

1981 Moto Guzzi V50 Monza R Rear

Moto Guzzi is famous for its big, agricultural v-twin machines.  But in the late 1970’s, they introduced their smaller displacement alternatives to the bigger sport and touring machines.  Although big bikes have always been popular in America, where motorcycles are often a luxury purchase, Europeans often find smaller bikes appealing, owing to sometimes high taxes on big bikes and the extremely high cost of fuel.

The little Guzzi’s never sold very well here and are correspondingly rare now.  They’re neat little machines, well-finished adult bikes, not the cheap, plastic learners and commuters we often get as small-displacement bikes here in the states.

1981 Moto Guzzi V50 Monza R Side

These little 350cc and 500cc [and later 650cc] Guzzis are styled like their big siblings, but share virtually no significant parts with them.  The big twins are very conventional in design, but the small Guzzis feature relatively unusual “Heron” style heads that improved economy and simplified manufacturing.

The V50 Monza was a true sportbike, just one with a fairly small engine.  45bhp isn’t all that much to play with, but the bike is relatively light, handling is excellent, braking very good, and the shaft drive very un-agricultural…

From the original eBay listing: 1981 Moto Guzzi V50 Monza for Sale

Up for auction is this practically fresh from crate 1981 Moto Guzzi V50 Monza with fewer than 100 miles on her.  The original owner purchased this bike from his local dealer in June of 1981. Yet after just a few enjoyable outings on his new Guzzi, he was diagnosed with an illness that kept him from riding.

He held onto the bike hoping to one day be able to enjoy it. Thus, it was kept with fresh fuel, a battery tender attached and on special lift so the tires would not touch the garage floor…

Just this year I acquired the Monza, turned on the fuel, the choke and the key, pressed the starter and she fired up immediately. After a warm up on the stand, I changed what looked like brand new oil. Since, I have topped up the tires, and changed out the brake fluid. A quick detail has been given to the bike and I have ridden it about 10 miles.

I believe this Monza is as nice and close to uncrated condition, without being restored, as you will find anywhere in the world.

1981 Moto Guzzi V50 Monza Dash

This bike presents us with a dilemma: the little Guzzis are great, affordable and stylish machines that happen to be great motorcycles to put miles on.  So when you’ve got one with so few, it seems a shame to destroy the originality by riding it.

But what else do you do with such a fun little machine?

-tad

1981 Moto Guzzi V50 Monza R Front

 

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1981 Moto Guzzi CX100 With Raceco Motor for Sale

1981 Moto Guzzi CX100 L Front

It seems like Moto Guzzis are the big-block Chevys of the vintage motorcycle world.  People always seem to be dropping bigger pistons into the motors and making them into thundering but reliable sportbikes that can also eat up the miles.  The CX100 isn’t quite classic yet, and this is the perfect example of a hot rod Guzzi you can pick up for a surprisingly small sum, considering the work that’s gone into it.

1981 Moto Guzzi CX100 Engine Detail

Although it’s basically a restyled LeMans I, one of the most iconic Guzzis of the modern era, the angular, 1980′s origami-style fairings and bodywork are just now beginning to be seen as stylish, not simply overwrought.  These Guzzi’s, along with classics like the original Katana, are becoming much more desirable.  The CX’s used to be prime candidates for LeMans I clones, but they’re rapidly becoming classics in their own right and deserve to be left original

1981 Moto Guzzi CX100 Dash

If you can get through the original ALL CAPS LISTING on eBay: 1981 Moto Guzzi CX100 for Sale

NO RESERVE. 1981 MOTO GUZZI LEMANS CX100 HAS 12182 ORIGINAL MILES ON THE BIKE. THE ENGINE WAS SENT TO RACECO AND HAD EVERYTHING DONE TO IT THE LIST IS HUGE SO READ CAREFULLY.ONLY 1 MILE ON ENGINE. 2 PLUG HEADS BIGGER VALVES DYNA IGNITION SYSTEM, ALLOY TIMING GEARS, FLYWHEEL LIGHTEND, CARRILLO RODS, 90MM NIKASIL CYLINDERS WITH WIESCO PISTONS, VALVE SPRINGS ,CAM, PUSH RODS ALL RACECO. BIGGER OIL PAN WITH FILTER, 9.8 COMPRESSION RATIO RUNS ON PREMIUM GAS.ALSO HAS KONI SHOCKS IN THE REAR, CUSTOM MADE CORBIN SEAT. RIMS ALL POWDER COATED AS WELL AS THE LOWER FORK LEGS BEATIFUL. PAINT IS FLAWLESS. BRAKES ALL HAVE CUSTOM LINES AND NUTS. BUB HEADERS AND CONTI MUFFLERS. BIGGER DELLORTO CARBS WITH VELOCITY STACKS. THIS BIKE MEANS BUSINESS IT IS VERY FAST AND SOUNDS LIKE A V8 WITH A SUPERCHARGER. 100HP REAR WHEEL ON DYNO. YOU MAY NEVER HAVE A CHANCE TO GET ANOTHER BIKE LIKE THIS IN THIS CONDITION. 

You’re getting a pretty good bang for your buck here with a motor fully built by Raceco: timing gears, Wiseco pistons, Carrillo rods, and more.  If it’s really making the claimed 100hp at the rear wheel, I’m sure it’s a real beast to ride.  I’d prefer a bit less red on bits like the fork legs and wheels, but this is a great machine for what looks like will be a bargain price: bidding is up to about $5,800 with very little time left.  Not a fan of the styling? Yank it off, stick on a MotoGadget multifunction gauge and a round headlight.  But save that stuff: you may want it when it’s time to sell…

-tad

1981 Moto Guzzi CX100 R Rear

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Reader’s Ride: Very Original 1973 Moto Guzzi V7 Sport for Sale

1973 Moto Guzzi V7 Sport Black L Side

Look, you can mock old Guzzi’s all you want for their “truck-like” qualities.  Deride their descended-from-a-tractor heritage.  Laugh as they lurch to the side when you blip the throttle.  But “truck-like” is apt in more ways than one: trucks are built to do stuff, and go places.  Not sit in a garage being tinkered with like some exotic sports car.  I know a guy who’s a pretty accomplished motorcycle mechanic.  He got that way because he owns old Triumphs and got tired of constantly paying mechanics to work on them.

Old Moto Guzzi’s are built to go places.  And the V7 was built to go places quickly: you really can’t argue with the sheer, mile-munching charisma of a nice Moto Guzzi.

1973 Moto Guzzi V7 Sport Black Dash

The V7 Sport was Guzzi’s first v-twin sportbike, an attempt to move away from the touring character of the earlier “loop-framed” V700’s.  The new frame, designed by Lino Tonti, allowed the low, lean stance that characterizes their sporting motorcycles and was so effective it was used, in one form or another, for the next forty years.

This, early drum-braked example looks to be extremely original and needs very little to be done.  The original eBay listing has a pretty comprehensive overview of the bike’s condition: 1973 Moto Guzzi V7 Sport for Sale

Overall, the bike is in very good condition and runs and rides well.  The engine has a little over 140psi compression in both cylinders tested cold, doesn’t smoke or burn oil as best I can tell, and doesn’t leak anywhere.  The transmission shifts nicely (for a Guzzi!) and is a five speed, with the old right hand shift, one up, four down shift pattern.  Original levers, switches, controls, etc. all appear to be in good condition and operate as they should.  The only two exceptions are the neutral light which works, but goes on and off in just about any gear depending on the day of the month and where the moon is in the sky (pretty sure it needs a new neutral indicator switch although it may just be that it’s Italian!) and the starter button on the handlebars.  The starter button doesn’t work, but the key switch starter position works fine.  I’m not sure what the issue is there, and honestly haven’t tried to troubleshoot it.  All the other electrics work fine including, lights, horn, turn signals, brake lights, etc.

Wheels are all original and correct Borrani rims and stainless spokes (that’s what they came with new) in excellent condition with a new set of Dunlop D404’s on them.  I checked the brake shoes when I replaced the tires and all looked good. 

I have done little to the bike since I’ve owned it other than put a new set of tires on it, change all the oil (engine, transmission and rear end), checked and set the timing and valve clearances, washed and waxed it and ridden it.  It starts almost instantly, and is a blast to ride.  If you’ve always wanted a V7 Sport, this is a very nice relatively low mileage example that runs well.  

1973 Moto Guzzi V7 Sport Black R Engine

Nice old collectible Guzzis always present a bit of a conundrum: do you cherish them for their handsome looks, quality engineering, and important place in motorcycling history?  Or do you strap a pack and bedroll to the seat and head out to the middle of nowhere on a road trip?

The choice is yours.

-tad

1973 Moto Guzzi V7 Sport Black R Rear

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1975 Moto Guzzi 850T Cafe Racer for Sale

1975 Moto Guzzi T Cafe Front

If you’re looking to collect a sporty Guzzi big twin, the V7 Sports and LeMans are the ones to have.  If you’re on a budget, aren’t concerned about originality, don’t mind scouring eBay, and are handy, you can have a great, usable machine you won’t be afraid to thrash for much less…

1975 Moto Guzzi T Cafe R Side

The Lino Tonti-framed Guzzis have been in nearly continuous production since the V7 Sport, and all of the late 70’s bikes make great foundations for replicas and customs, with a wide variety of sporting parts available: Tommaselli clip-ons, replacement V7 and LeMans tanks, rearsets, LaFranconi mufflers, Agostini gears to replace the timing chain, bigger pistons…

This one’s just had most of the heavy lifting done for you.  Just maybe needs a coat of professional paint, a MotoGadget gauge to replace the clunky stockers, some detail work, and someone to ride it.

1975 Moto Guzzi T Cafe Dash

The original eBay listing includes a long list of parts and work that has been done: 1975 Moto Guzzi 850T Cafe Racer for Sale

I’m the 2nd owner of this bike, it was purchased new in 1976 at Drager’s Seattle, WA.

  • Agostini rear-sets
  • Tommaselli adjustable clip-ons
  • V7 Sport fuel tank, with new petcocks from MG Cycle. 
  • shaved and polished triple tree
  • polished aluminum headlight mounts
  • Fiberglass cafe seat from “Glass From The Past”
  • Carbs just rebuilt and synced, aluminum velocity stacks
  • Recent brakes and adjusted
  • Braile carbon fiber battery
  • Renthal grips
  • Chrome fin guards from MG Cycle
  • Fresh oil change and filter
  • Engine compression tested, very good!
  • Avon venom tires, plenty of tread still on them
  • Recent fork seals and dust caps
  • Cat eye taillight and plate holder, upgraded turn signals(one came loose, gorilla taped it) stock headlight
  • Bub exhaust 
  • Lowered stock gauges(the tack has a cracked lens, but works fine)
  • Shortened stock front fender
  • NGK steering damper
  • Lots of other little stuff fixed and new

This is exactly the sort of thing I’m planning to do someday: find a nice 1970′s T, slap on a nice V7 Sport or LeMans tank, and cafe it up!  Mine would have the later twin-disc front end, have slash-cut mufflers, a dual seat, and Aston Martin green paint on the tank, but otherwise this is the look I love for old Guzzis.

1975 Moto Guzzi T Cafe Engine Close

Bidding is at about $3,700 with four days left and the reserve not yet met.  This would make a great rider as-is or be the perfect basis for a really classy vintage machine like the ones from Kaffeemaschine or Officine Rosso Puro.  I’m not sure where the seller has the reserve set, but if you’re in the market for something that offers lantern-jawed good looks, easy parts availability, and usability, keep an eye on this one.

-tad

1975 Moto Guzzi T Cafe Steering Damper

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1960 Moto Guzzi Lodola for Sale

1960 Moto Guzzi Lodola L Rear

The Moto Guzzi Lodola [“Lark”] is yet another reminder that, in the motorcycling world, bigger wasn’t always considered better.  In the past, tax laws that penalized big bikes and the simple efficiency of small motorcycles was appealing in an era where the choice to ride was often driven more by economic necessity than issues of vanity or pleasure.  With cars often an unaffordable luxury, small, practical, but stylish machines were a very realistic transportation choice.

Our motorcycling forefathers seem to have been spoilt for choice when it came to choosing a stylish, practical mount.  It’s hard to imagine now, in an era when it sometimes seems like motorcycles fall into only one of two categories: boat-anchor, chrome-dripping, heavyweight retro cruisers and insane, race-track escapee plastic darts that require rattlesnake reflexes to ride effectively.  Heck, the smallest Guzzi you can buy these days is a 750, a machine that would have been considered big at one point, but is obviously tiny when you compare it to their new 1400cc offering…

But the little Lodola was considered to be a very sophisticated machine at the time, with a mutable character that reflected the rider’s mood, or right wrist.  The little 235cc bike is particularly interesting  for being the last bike designed with founder Carlo Guzzi’s direct input.

1960 Moto Guzzi Lodola L Engine

See the original eBay listing: 1960 Moto Guzzi Lodola for Sale

This particular example appears to be well maintained and is being sold by an owner who is clearly attempting to accurately represent the bike being offered.  From the original listing:

These are issues I know the bike has.  They are minor, but for full disclosure, here they are:  

-  It does leak a little oil like many of these old bikes do.  There is a new engine gasket set included in the spare parts if it bothers you enough to swap them out.  Never bothered me. Main issue is fixed, yet because of the age of this bike, I cannot guarantee it will not leak ever again.

-  Mileage is unknown.

-  There are two small paint chips on the left side upper fork, one small chip on the bottom of the rear fender, and a small stress crack on the left side of the rear fender that I have seen on almost every Lodola.  These can be seen in the last three pictures.  There are also a couple of small chips on the frame, but are only visible with the engine case covers removed.

- The muffler is a period Moto Guzzi replacement, not the original.  It shows some minor chrome flaking as it was not restored.  It still looks nice, but close examination will show the flaking.  Personally, I like this muffler better than an original as it is a little shorter and “Moto Guzzi” is embossed in it, which the original did not have.

The bike will come with some extra parts left over from the rebuild and reproduction owner’s and service manuals (in Italian).

1960 Moto Guzzi Lodola L Rear Low

I’ve only seen a couple of these come up for sale, and bidding is still very low for this bike, so I’m curious to see what we’ll be looking at when the [virtual] gavel comes down on this auction.  But it looks like a very cool little machine for Sunday rides down country lanes.

-tad

1960 Moto Guzzi Lodola R side

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1978 Moto Guzzi LeMans for Sale

1978 Moto Guzzi LeMans Silver R Side

Moto Guzzi’s LeMans I is one of my all time favorite motorcycles: the low, lean and muscular silhouette, bulging cylinders, and period-skinny tires make a powerful impression.  Throw in stable handling and famous durability, and you have a bike that can be showcased in your living room or do double-duty as a weekend touring machine.

The LeMans was designed to be Guzzi’s sporting standard bearer in the late 1970’s big bore bike wars.  The famous Tonti frame was so effective, Guzzi used it well into the modern era: it allowed the motor to be set very low for good handling and aggressive looks, and detachable lower frame rails made major maintenance relatively straightforward for such a compact machine.

1978 Moto Guzzi LeMans Silver Front1978 Moto Guzzi LeMans Silver Rear

Unfortunately, the ubiquity of this frame and widespread availability of parts means that it is relatively easy to faithfully “recreate” these iconic machines.  In fact, as prices on original machines rise, it becomes even more important to do your research before shelling out big bucks on a real LeMans.

This particular machine looks great, but is a bit of a question mark.  The seller mentions it is a LeMans, but is it a Mark I or MarkII/CX1000?  1978 brought on a redesign of the bike to update styling and address some of the original bike’s shortcomings, but many of the later bikes have been retrofitted to match the earlier, more popular style.

1978 Moto Guzzi LeMans Silver Dash

This one’s VIN does not appear to fit into the Mark I’s VIN number range: VE11111 to VE13040 [per Mick Walker’s Illustrated Moto Guzzi Buyer’s Guide], and the black fork legs should belong to the later model, although the brakes are in front of the fork legs, not behind them as on the Mark II/CX1000.  In addition, the red frame and silver paint combo, while very attractive, was not available on the Mark I from the factory.  The Mark I came in bright red, with a very few ice blue and white models making their way to the US [all with black frames], so this bike has very likely been repainted at some point.

From the original eBay listing: 1978 Moto Guzzi LeMans for Sale.

Always garage kept. Just had the tranny spring replaced as well as the tires, battery, fluids, and brake pads. Carbs were rebuilt and was told the clutch looks good. This machine sounds like no other bike on the road. Runs good and pulls like a train. This use to be my only bike but now is 1 of a few and it deserves to be ridden not just admired. That’s where you come in. Have been asked over the years to sell her but now is the time. The Bad is that while attempting to bleed the brakes 2 of the bleeders snapped off. I do not have the tools to undertake this task. If you know a mechanic they have the correct tools for the job.

In any event, questions about originality aside, this looks to be a great looking, well-maintained machine with low mileage.  Assuming the bidding doesn’t get out of hand, this might be the perfect way to get into classic Guzzi ownership.

-tad

1978 Moto Guzzi LeMans Silver L Side Engine

 

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1973 Moto Guzzi V7 Sport for Sale

1973 Moto Guzzi V7 Sport R Side Rear

This one might be flying under most everyone’s radar, since it is listed on eBay under “Other Makes” instead of “Moto Guzzi.” And while this might suggest that the seller is inexpert when it comes to selling bikes on eBay, it looks like the bike being sold is pretty well put together.

1973 Moto Guzzi V7 Sport L Front

The original listing includes the following upgrades and repairs: 1973 Moto Guzzi V7 Sport for Sale

This Moto Guzzi was found in the back of a garage in Newton, Mass. 70% disassembled.  According to the 87 year old widow it was left there by her son some 35 years ago.  100% of the original bikes parts were there, however, not all parts survived the long storage. 80% of the parts were restorable and used.  The following are the parts that were replaced with new and or changed:

Twin disc front brakes from 1976 850T3- fork sliders, calipers, rotors, wheel hub, master cylinder

“B10″ cam shaft

30mm PHF pumper carbs and intake manifolds

Started, light and signal switched

All new cables, hoses, seals, and gaskets

Complete valve job with new valves and guides

The exhaust system was powder coated because the chrome was so bad it could not be restored.

The gas tank, side storage boxes, and seat are all original and show normal wear and tear. The frame was powder coated and all other non-coated parts were either replated or polished. Wheels were completely cleaned and polished including the brass spoke nipples.

The longitudinal V-twins from Manello get covered on this site regularly, but for those of you who are unfamiliar with this iconic machine: the V7 Sport was really ground zero for Guzzi’s long-running line of V-twin sportbikes.  It combined the rugged, long-legged engine, five-speed transmission, and shaft-drive from the V700 with a frame that set the powertrain lower for a better center of gravity, allowing stable, if not particularly agile handling.  This frame proved so simple and effective it survived well into the modern age.

1973 Moto Guzzi V7 Sport Dash

1973 Moto Guzzi V7 Sport R Side Engine Detail

-tad

1

1974 Moto Guzzi V7 Sport

$T2eC16VHJGQE9noM,K0gBRQhRUVQyQ~~60_3

The Moto Guzzi V7 Sport, known for its green or red frame, with the engine flying out from under the tank. This 1974 Moto Guzzi V7 Sport may not have the green or red frame, but the engine is there, and trying to climb up, around the gas tank just like it should.

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From the seller

I’ve owned my Moto Guzzi since spring of 1989. At that time it had about 18,000 miles and in 24 years it is now up to 43,212 original miles. This is a classic Euro-sport bike built in the “cafe racer” style of that era. Guzzi shipped about 700 of these V7 Sports to the states between 1970 thru 1974. They are quite rare and desirable. In great condition with original chrome, I painted the tank and side cases in the original fire-red color about ten years ago. The vinyl seat cover was replaced several years back and could probably stand to be replaced again in a year or two.

$T2eC16NHJGQE9noMZH!FBRQhUbS!wQ~~60_3

First offered up in 1970 the 748cc twin Dell’orto fed V-Twin (?) would produce 52bhp at 6300rpm. These horses were directed to the rear wheel with a shaft drive, turning first through a 5 speed gear box. But the game changer for the new Guzzi is the low frame, designed by Lino Tonti, which included a pair of diagonally matched top rails running between the cylinder heads.

$T2eC16VHJHEE9ny2rS4QBRQhTb1vnQ~~60_3

More from the seller

The 90 degree, 53 hp air cooled, 2-valve 4-stroke v-twin engine has plenty of torque and emits a marvelous sound. The 5 gallon tank will ensure you will be riding all day. The shaft drive will keep your pants clean. Also, I installed an electronic ignition point-eliminator kit. The distributor is still there but disconnected. Two years ago I installed a new electric wiring harness, clutch cable and brake cables, and battery. I haven’t driven it much the past few years since I acquired a much newer BMW. Engine and frame numbers are matching 03378, built by Seimm-MotoGuzzi Co. in Mandello Lario, Italy in July 1973 and stamped as a 1974 model. I have a Xeroxed and bound copy of the original shop manual. The bike never had turn signals when I got it, but was originally wired to have them. All kinds of parts are available and my personal favorite source is Harper’s in Greenwood, Missouri. Would the Guzzi company place this V7 Sport onto the floor of their museum? Unlikely. This bike has not been restored to every specific detail that a meticulous restoration would demand. Take it as far as you want… but it wouldn’t take a whole lot to fine tune the appearance to that exactitude. The bike is meant to be driven by a caring individual that knows this machine is 40 years old this July. I’ve had it on several long rides before, but these days I would rather stay in Santa Fe and the surrounding area. Much like leading a precious puppy on a leash… the Guzzi is a constant recipient of praise, wide smiles and thumbs up… all of it offered by grown men who display a visceral reaction to seeing such a fine old bike that reminds them of their youth

 

$T2eC16dHJHwE9n8ii-zGBRQhRWU(uw~~60_3

Yes the V7 Sport is known for the red or green frame, but not everyone wants to scream visually as well as audibly as the go down the road. This 1974 V7 Sport has a black frame, red tin’s and a 4 leading front brake. A $20,000 starting bid may not be in line with the black frame, but it also is described as a well put together rider. BB

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