Round-Case Roadster: 1974 Ducati GT750 for Sale

1974 Ducati GT750 L Front

The round-case Ducati 750 Sport and Super Sport get most of the attention, with their sexy looks and uncompromising riding positions. But the GT750 was actually the first roadgoing Ducati to use their famous L-twin engine and is a far more practical package, for riders that plan to spend more time riding than admiring their motorcycles.

1974 Ducati GT750 R Side

Introduced in 1971, the 748cc 90° twin is the beautiful, beating heart of the bike. Tower shafts and bevel-drive housings on the head suggest Ducati’s desmodromics, but unlike modern Ducatis, only the top-of-the-line Super Sports got the Desmo system, and the GT made do with simple valve springs.

I understand that modern performance and reliability come with the need for radiators, wires, and little black plastic boxes, but there’s something very appealing about the finned aluminum center of this beast. Visually, it dominates the bike in the best sense, and drips with a combination of engineering and craftsmanship. And with 60 claimed horsepower and lots of torque, it offers up plenty of real-world performance, even today.

1974 Ducati GT750 Tank Engine

This 1974 example would have been one of the very last bikes built before the switch to the less elegant square-case engines. There’s little performance difference, but purists prefer the more elegant round-case bikes, and it’s easy to see why.

1974 Ducati GT750 Throttle

From the original eBay listing: 1974 Ducati GT750 for Sale

For sale a 1974 Ducati GT750, this bike is a very clean rider in good condition with many rare hard to find items, I’ve owned this iconic Ducati for the past 7 years. The Kentucky title clean/clear in my name and in hand.

Motor was completely rebuilt by Saarland Ducati (Bevel specialist in Germany) in 2012 it has approximately 800 miles on the rebuild, during those 800 miles the bevels/shims clearances was checked for tolerance around 400-500 miles with no issues. 

Installed Dyna electronic ignition making this Beautiful bike more user rider friendly, the PHF 30’s cleaned last September 2015, new battery installed Dec 2015. Bike starts with a couple of kicks, idles and runs nicely and sounds great through the original Conti’s.

The hard to find parts:

  • Borrani’s rims 18″/19″ with new Metzler Lasertec tires (zero miles)
  • Aprilia dash, horn/hi-beam switch, headlight and fuse box, 
  • Original seat pan with a very nice reproduction seat cover
  • Tommaselli handbar and throttle assembly 
  • Marzocchi shocks
  • Ceriani forks
  • Original Conti exhaust system 
  • Dellorto PHF 30A carburetors 
  • Dyna electronic ignition 
  • Clean rust free tank, original steel side covers, the Burnt Orange paint’s in very nice condition and was done in 2008 
  • New battery
  • Rare side stand and center stand

Runs good with no issues

I’ve enjoyed this beautiful motorcycle for several years but, now its time to shift my collection and let someone else enjoy this fantastic bike.

1974 Ducati GT750 R Front

Bidding is up over $15,000 with very little time left on the auction, with a Buy It Now price of just under $20,000. Obviously, this bike’s days as “the affordable Bevel” are long past, but this particular example looks to have been well cared for by a enthusiast owner, and the GT750 offers up plenty of style, performance, and a dash of practicality.

-tad

1974 Ducati GT750 L Side

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3 Responses

  1. sr88 says:

    Do the engine and frame VIN match when these early 750’s came from the factory?
    If so is that why the seller suggests to read the description very carefully?
    How big of an issue is a non-matching VIN (66 VS. 11, 55 units off) in the vintage Ducati world?

    What else do you see wrong with this GT?

  2. tad says:

    These are very good questions, and ones I’m hoping any bevel-drive fans of the site will point out for us!

  3. Steve in Maine says:

    I just checked the data index at bevelheaven.com. It looks like, at that period of time, engine numbers on the 750 GT were running ahead of frame numbers by anywhere from 50 to 150. So, while not matching, that combination of frame and engine numbers seems plausible. Hope that helps.