Tagged: Heron head

Brains Versus Brawn: 1977 Moto Morini 3½ for Sale

1977 Moto Morini 350 L Side

Today’s Moto Morini 3½ offers up classic Italian style from a forgotten brand. Or they would be forgotten, if it’s possible to forget something you never knew in the first place, and I’d expect that very few Americans have any idea the brand ever existed. A relaunch was tried a few years back, with the usual range of sporty nakeds and adventure-touring bikes. But they were never available in the US and while those bikes were throbbing and dangerous, they didn’t offer up anything new to buyers, except a nameplate with dubious cachet. Those bikes also seemed to lack the traditional Morini virtues as well, as the brand typically stressed handling over brute power.

1977 Moto Morini 350 R Side Detail

Motorcycling history is filled with bikes specifically built for the American market. They were often powered by newer, larger versions of existing engines and these updated powerplants were apparently intended to help us conquer the wide-open spaces of the West. There’s a reason Harley has the big bike market cornered here, and it stems from the kind of riding we do and the kind of roads we have, since many people have to drive quite a ways to find a twisty section of asphalt to enjoy. But either through hubris or simple economic necessity, Moto Morini never developed a bike bigger than the 500cc version of their 72º v-twin: the oddly-named “3½” was basically a 350 and would have been classed as a “middleweight” at the time.

1977 Moto Morini 350 Dash

Instead, they focused on handling, and Moto Morini twins are famously enjoyable to hustle through the canyons, with a surprisingly sophisticated rubber belt-driven camshaft, Heron-heads, and a six-speed transmission. In 1977, many bikes made do with just four gears, and that six-speed would have been a very exotic selling point.

From the original eBay listing: 1977 Moto Morini 3½ for Sale

For sale is a red and black 1977 Moto Morini 3 1/2 has 8,499 miles that has been well-maintained. This Italian sports bike in a great original bike in good condition with matching numbers. This bike is all factory stock down to the twin factory pipes, paint and all of the informational stickers applied by Moto Morini. This bike has a V-Twin engine, 344cc motor and a 6 speed transmission. Carburetors were recently rebuilt.  It is a low maintenance bike.

The exterior is red and black paint with hand pin striping.  The paint is in excellent condition with just one minor ding in the right hand side of the gas tank by the seat.  The black leather seat is comfortable and in excellent condition with no rips or tears.

This is a great bike to commute on, or blast around on a curvy road, or as a sport tourer. It is a great original bike in good shape.

1977 Moto Morini 350 R Side Engine

With less than 10,000 miles on the odometer, this is a pretty clean little motorcycle. Bidding is up to $3,750.00 and is very active, with the reserve met. Values on Morinis have seen a rise in the past year or two, but they’re still incredible bargains, compared to basically any Ducati and most Guzzis. This 3½ is stylish, sophisticated, easy to maintain, and a great choice if you’re looking to buy a classic Italian motorcycle and want something just a little bit different.

-tad

1977 Moto Morini 350 R Side

Good Things in Small Packages: 1981 Moto Guzzi V50 Monza

1981 Moto Guzzi V50 Monza L Side

Although styled to match their bigger siblings, Moto Guzzi’s V35 and V50 models shared few mechanical components and, in some ways, were more refined, sophisticated machines. They shared the longitudinal engine configuration and shaft-drive with the bigger bikes, but used unconventional “Heron” -style heads that improve both manufacturing and combustion efficiency.

1981 Moto Guzzi V50 Monza R Front

Heron heads have been used by Jaguar, Ford, and Volvo and were used extensively by Moto Morini. Basically, the surface of a Heron-style head is flat, instead of domed, with valves running parallel to each other instead of angled. Combustion then occurs in the top of the dished piston top and has advantages in terms of fuel economy. The simplified design means manufacturing costs are significantly lowered.

1981 Moto Guzzi V50 Monza L Front

The V50 put out 45hp which is certainly enough to have some fun with, especially when combined with the bike’s light weight, strong brakes, and generally excellent handling. The shaft drive is also reportedly less pronounced than on larger models, perhaps because the smaller bike’s drivetrain contains less rotating mass.

1981 Moto Guzzi V50 Monza Dash

Introduced in the late 1970’s, the V35 and V50 were primarily intended for the European market, where taxes and fuel prices are generally much higher than here in the US. But some of the littler Guzzi’s did make it over here and although they are rare, often show up in surprisingly good condition. Although I’ve never seen one quite this nice…

From the original eBay listing: 1981 Moto Guzzi V50 Monza for Sale

Very rare bike in the US and seldom seen for sale at all, much less in this condition. I rode this bike around the hills of North Carolina and Tennessee for a few years after I bought it, and enjoyed every mile. I then treated it to a complete frame off, full nut and bolt cosmetic restoration to the highest standards. The bike was originally red, but was changed to the gorgeous silver-blue as sold in Europe. The list of NOS parts used was very extensive and cost many thousands of dollars. The only changes from stock are a DynaTech electronic ignition and a pair of rearview mirrors that are much superior to the stock ones. While these bikes maintain the wonderful good looks of the 1000cc LeMans, they are extremely light and nimble at only 350 pounds, and must be experienced on a twisty road to fully appreciate their capabilities. A factory service manual and parts book is included with this sale.

The bike is fully sorted and needs nothing to enjoy as is. With that said, there is one issue that bears mention. It has what I consider to be an inordinate amount of noise in the primary drive. I have asked other Guzzi owners’ opinion on this, and they say it is normal for the model. The noise is reduced significantly when the clutch is pulled in, so if it is out of the ordinary I really don’t know what to blame for it. I have reduced the price $1000 from what I feel is a fair value on this bike to accommodate this issue. 

1981 Moto Guzzi V50 Monza Engine Detail

I’m curious about that noise the seller mentions. Guzzis use an automotive-style dry clutch that naturally makes more noise than an oil-bath clutch and certainly would be quieter once the clutch was pulled in. Without hearing it, or knowing the seller’s experience with other Guzzi models, it’s hard to say, but considering the work that’s gone into this, I think it’s worth taking a chance on.

While this certainly isn’t the fastest classic Guzzi around, I think it’s a great-looking bike, and it’s much more nimble than you might expect, given its chunky looks and that shaft drive. If you’re looking for something weird, collectible, fun, and relatively inexpensive, this little Monza would make an excellent choice.

-tad

1981 Moto Guzzi V50 Monza R Side

Champagne Taste, Beer Budget: 1975 Moto Morini 3½ Strada For Sale

1975 Moto Morini Strada L Side

Still the bargain of the vintage Italian biking scene, today’s Moto Morini 3½ Strada needs a bit of cosmetic work, but the price is in the ballpark and is said to run very nicely. With just 344cc’s and two valves per cylinder, you’ll need to make the most of the bike’s prodigious handling capabilities to keep up with bigger bikes on back roads but, like the RD400, these were famous giant-slayers in their day.

1975 Moto Morini Strada R Side Rear

The unconventional 72º v-twin was more compact than a 90º engine, and the smaller displacement meant that vibrations weren’t noticably increased. And while many machines still made do with a four-speed gearbox, the Morini’s six-speed part made sure riders could get the most from the bike’s 35-ish horses. The engine used pushrods to operate its valves, but the camshaft was driven by a toothed rubber belt, and the heads themselves were “Heron”-style, reducing manufacturing costs while allowing nearly 60mpg.

The bike came in two flavors: “Strada” and “Sport,” with the Sport being the sportier of the pair. The Strada came equipped with lower pegs and higher bars and a slightly lower state of tune for the engine.

1975 Moto Morini Strada R Side Engine

Period reviews found very little to complain about, other than the performance-per-dollar when compared to Japanese four-cylinder machines. But the Morini had vastly superior handling and that difficult to quantify Italian style that made it worth the cost then, and a complete bargain now.

1975 Moto Morini Strada Dash

From the original eBay listing: 1975 Moto Morini 3½ Strada for Sale

The bike has been in storage for many years (at least 15 years)  There is a workshop manual with the bike, there are some original tools.  the timing belt was just replaced and there is another new belt and the puller for the flywheel needed to replace the belt, with the bike.

It has a new rear chain. I went through the fuel system.    The bike runs beautifully, it has a 6 speed gearbox.  electrical system is good, system charges, Lights all work. new battery. the tires are very old.

The miles are correct, it is missing the right side tank emblem, there is a dent in the gas tank and some rust at the very rear of the right muffler. ( see pictures)   The alloy ball end is broken off the clutch lever but the bike does not appear to have any road damage

1975 Moto Morini Strada Rear

The $3,450 Buy It Now price seems smack in the middle for Morinis right now. This one has some cosmetic imperfections, including the missing tank badge on one side and the dent along the top, but with such low miles and in running condition, it looks like this will just need a basic tune up and a new set of tires to be ready to go!

1975 Moto Morini Strada Tank Detail

These are uncommon motorcycles that provide a ton of bang for your buck, so if you’re a fan of Italian twins but your budget won’t stretch to a vintage Ducati, grab one of these unintimidating little machines and get ready for the spring riding season!

-tad

1975 Moto Morini Strada R Side Front

Classy Little Italian: 1984 Moto Morini 350 K2 for Sale

1984 Moto Morini 350 K2 L Front

If you’re looking to ride something a bit different and don’t have a ton of cash to spend, you can’t go wrong with a Moto Morini like this 350 K2. Throughout the 1970’s and 1980’s, Morini’s v-twins were available in both 350 and 500 flavors. This example is clearly a child of the 80’s, but the styling is relatively restrained for the period and very tasteful.

1984 Moto Morini 350 K2 R Rear

Powered by a little 72° v-twin that was more compact than the 90° engines from Ducati and Guzzi but was still very smooth, the 344cc engine generated a respectable 37hp and it put those horses through a six-speed gearbox and dry clutch combo. While pushrods were a slightly low-tech feature, the engine was otherwise very sophisticated: the camshaft was driven by a toothed rubber belt and Heron-style heads helped provide excellent fuel economy, as well as yet more interesting trivia for bike-night discussions.

1984 Moto Morini 350 K2 Dash

Largely overlooked here in the US because of their small displacements, Moto Morinis made up in handling what they lacked in outright power. Famously nimble and sophisticated, they’ve been overlooked by collectors for a very long time, although prices have been on the rise in recent years. Morini twins featured both kick and electric start but, as the seller mentions: the “electric leg” was always a bit temperamental…

1984 Moto Morini 350 K2 L Rear2

From the original eBay listing: 1984 Moto Morini 350 K2 for Sale

If you are looking at this, then you already know that these Moto Morinis are renowned for their razor-sharp handling and their nimble, fun-to-ride nature. This one is no exception. The V-twin is surprisingly powerful for a 350 and road tests had their top speed around 100 MPH. The 6-speed trans is a delight to use, snicking up or down with a left-hand shifter that was much improved over earlier versions. The dry clutch is easy to pull but it never slips. It starts easily with the kicker and it also has an electric starter that works-sometimes. These engines have a reputation for reliability and durability. They need very little maintenance with their electronic ignition and simple screw-type valve adjusters.

When I bought the bike four years ago I was amazed at its excellent original condition. When I got it home I changed the oil, cleaned the oil filter and adjusted the valves. Since it had the original timing belt, I changed it for a new one that I got from North Leceister Motorcycles. They are the experts on these and they have a great stock of parts. They hold the K2 model in very high regard.

I have since put about 750 miles on it. Some of those were from riding it in the Cycle World Rolling Concours at Indianapolis Motor Speedway in 2012. It was in the Modern Classic class along with some really over-the-top restorations, so I felt almost guilty about it winning 3rd place since all I had to do was wash it!

The bike shows well, but there are the inevitable imperfections that one finds in a used, original bike. The windscreen is cracked. The flopping keys have worn the paint away at the ignition switch. There are a few nicks, the worst is shown in the pics.

1984 Moto Morini 350 K2 L Rear

Bidding on this is active, although at just $1,500 or so, the reserve has not been met. Which is no surprise: aside from a couple minor scuffs, this thing is in amazing condition and is very rare. Morinis are rising in value, but are still very affordable. If you’re looking for a quirky, collectable Italian that you will definitely not see at your regular bike meetup, give this one a serious look.

-tad

1984 Moto Morini 350 K2 R Side

Low Miles, Low-Buck Exotica: 1980 Moto Morini 500 Sport for Sale

1980 Moto Morini 500 Sport L Front

For those of you who thought Italian exotica were far out of reach, check out this very nice 1980 Moto Morini 500 Sport.  Postwar Italy saw a boom in two-wheeled motorcycle manufacture: the population of a country devastated by war was eager to get back to work and was hungry for cheap, stylish transportation. Obviously, many manufacturers of scooters, mopeds, and motorcycles came into existence and quickly disappeared during this period, but a few survived into the modern day, or have been resurrected, like zombies in Armani suits.

1980 Moto Mornini 500 Sport Dash

Moto Morini was one of the latter, a company that actually began before World War I, then faded after a purchase by Cagiva in the late 1980’s, only to be brought back again during the late 90’s as a sort of brutish Ducati rival, a shame considering their earlier history of making smaller-engined sporting machines. In fact, Morini’s insistence on not catering to the American market by creating larger-displacement bikes may have sealed the company’s doom: the 500 Sport shown here was as big as they got.

1980 Moto Morini 500 Sport R Side

But don’t let the relatively small engines fool you: these are serious sporting machines with revvy and sweet v-twins that made useful power and returned excellent fuel mileage, capable of embarrassing much more powerful machines in the corners and on the brakes. With a very rare for the period six-speed gearbox and a compact 72° engine with a rubber belt to drive the cam and Heron heads, Morinis were technologically advanced, brains-over-brawn machines.

1980 Moto Morini 500 Sport L Engine

Of course, no Italian bike of the period would be complete without some sort of mechanical foible. In Morini’s case, it was the fitting of a kickstart lever as well as a generally useless electric start. While it is possible to find bikes with the electric starter in good working condition, they’re far from reliable and most Morini owners seem to just ignore them when they fail and use the kick start.

1980 Moto Morini 500 Sport L Rear

From the original eBay listing, which includes more of the seller’s history with the marque than of the bike itself: 1980 Moto Morini 500 Sport for Sale

I was witness to the entire history of this particular machine from when it left Herm Baver’s (Herdan Corp.) Dealer/Distributership to the present time. Sometime in the early eighties I bought my 1980 3 1/2 Sport Morini from my friend Jason who was a real Morini fancier and who had bought a number of machines from Herm. I was living on the Lower East Side of Manhattan at the time and my neighbor Ira, who was riding an old Triumph Bonnie then, liked my 350 Morini enough that he bought this 500 Sport from Jason soon after. Both these Moto Morinis, it should be noted, had only the mileage registered that’s required to ride them from Port Clinton, Pa (the home to this day of Herdan Corp.) to Jason’s house in Greenwood lake, N.Y. They were barely broken in.

Anyway, the city’s a tough place to have a really nice motorcycle and Ira was never comfortable leaving it any- -where so he sold it to an Englishman I’d sold some other bikes to and went back to his old Bonnie. Soon after, John, the Englishman, went back to Jolly Old leaving the bike with me and here it jolly well is(still in Ira’s name) ready for a new “la Strega” transfer (included with the bike) on the saddle tailpiece and probably a set of tires, as the mint originals are maybe getting a bit wooden after 34 years. Aside from that there’s a hairline crack in one of the side covers and a scratch at the back of the tank near the saddle (see photos). Otherwise it’s the thing of beauty “time capsule” you see here.

Funny, I’ve been referring to my Ducati as “la Strega” since I got her. For those of you not fluent in Italian, “Strega” translates directly as “witch”, although my Italian buddy also reliably tells me it’s also used as a synonym for “bitch.” In either case, probably not the best nickname for such a fun little bike! The seller doesn’t include all that much detail regarding the actual maintenance history, but you can probably infer from his background and the cosmetic condition that it’s been pretty well cared for.

1980 Moto Morini 500 Sport Clocks

These bikes have been climbing in value for a while now: 7 or 8 years ago, when I was bike shopping for budget Italian machines like this, they could be had for $2,500, if you could actually find one. They are typically well-loved, but also generally well-used and patina’d bikes in keeping with their low-cost exotic status. But this may be the very nicest example I’ve seen for sale, although perhaps that’s just the really nice, high-resolution photos talking!

Bidding is active, but the reserve has not been met at just over $4k with about six days to go on the auction.

1980 Moto Morini 500 Sport L Side

The Morini name may not have the cache of Ducati or MV Agusta, and their smaller-displacements and slightly forgotten status has kept prices comparatively low. The bikes are reliable, and maintenance parts are generally available for them if you don’t mind doing a bit of research. If you’ve always fancied a classic Italian, but thought they were out of reach, keep an eye on this one!

-tad

1980 Moto Morini 500 Sport L Front Close

1978 Moto Morini 3½ Sport for Sale

1978 Moto Morini 350 Sport L Side

If the “3½” on the side panels of this little Moto Morini confuse you, just be glad you don’t have to mess around with having to type that out for this article. Why they didn’t just call it a “350”, I don’t know but, while they have increased in value over the last few years, they’re still very affordable. If you can find one to buy.

1978 Moto Morini 350 Sport Cockpit

Speaking of: you know, I really do wish that folks looking for us to spend $6,000 on a motorcycle we haven’t had the chance to visually inspect would at least roll the bike out into the daylight so we can have some pictures where those clunky safety reflectors don’t glow like Ralph Nader’s eyes, always watching, watching… Luckily, I’m a big fan of these little 344cc motorcycles that, while not so famous for outright power, were well-endowed in the handling department and are said to be able to embarrass much larger and more modern machines when ridden correctly.

1978 Moto Morini 350 Sport Dash

From the original listing: 1978 Moto Morini 3½ Sport for sale

This is a beautiful Moto Morini 3 1/2 sport.  Been in a museum for approximately the last 10 years.  Will need a battery and the carbs cleaned.

That’s it. That’s all we have to go on. No worries: I’ll fill you in on some of the features of these innovative little bikes. Like the unusual 72º configuration that provides something approaching the perfect primary balance of a 90º twin but with far more compact dimensions, the relatively rare-for-the time six-speed gearbox, interchangeable heads front and rear, both kick and electric start. Although really that’s one and a half features, since the electric leg is unlikely to work very often… And Heron-style heads, for ease of manufacture and excellent fuel economy.

1978 Moto Morini 350 Sport L Engine

So while you may have to buy most of your spare parts online, and finding a mechanic to work on your little pride-and-joy might be difficult, these little Moto Morinis provide a ton of bang for your buck combined with very interesting technical specification, and I’d love to have room for one in my garage.

Lots of time on this auction, so take a look!

-tad

1978 Moto Morini 350 Sport R Rear

1986 Moto Guzzi V65 Lario for Sale

1986 Moto Guzzi V65 R Front

This one’s on the edge of acceptably “classic”, but it’s an interesting bike and pretty rare.  It was also my riding buddy’s first bike: no Suzuki GS500E for him!  No, he had to have something Italian, a nice Moto Guzzi V65 Lario that I had to drive all the way to Washington DC to pick up for him…

1986 Moto Guzzi V65 L Rear

The V50 that preceded it was sweet-handling but underpowered.  A bump in displacement didn’t help much on its own and, to my knowledge, we didn’t get those in the US anyway.  The V65 Lario hoped to address this lack of performance with an update from two to four valves per cylinder.  Unfortunately, lubrication was not increased to handle the additional moving parts, and failures resulted.

Although these are very likely to have been fixed under warranty by now, you might want to pop the valve cover off one of the heads, just to be sure.  Black-finished cam followers will indicate the work has been performed.

1986 Moto Guzzi V65 Dash

The move to four valves had just the effect you’d expect: little change at low rpm, and better breathing as the revs piled on.  The bike could reach almost 115mph, not a bad figure for a 650cc twin.  Unfortunately, the 16″ wheels on Guzzi’s of this era were a bit of a fashion statement, as the frames were not really engineered with geometry to flatter this tire: handling was universally twitchy and the bikes had a tendency to stand up under braking, characteristics at odds with traditional Guzzi stability.

From the original, naturally all-capital eBay listing: 1986 Moto Guzzi V65 Lario for Sale

1986 MOTO GUZZI V65 LARIO, BIKE IS IN OVERALL NICE CONDITION, 21,131 MILES, THESE ARE RARE BIKES AND DON’T COME UP FOR AUCTION OFTEN. I PURCHASED THE BIKE FROM THE SECOND OWNER WHO HAD IT FOR THE LAST 22 YEARS,AND WAS ALWAYS DEALER MAINTAINED,, BIKE SAT FOR THE LAST 5 YEARS IN A HEATED WAREHOUSE, SINCE I PURCHASED THE BIKE I HAVE GONE THROUGH THE CARBS ,INSTALLED A NEW BATTERY,CLUTCH, FLYWHEEL AND STARTER, BIKE RUNS GOOD, SHIFTS GREAT , BRAKES ARE GOOD AND THE LIGHTS WORK,,,BIKE IS LIGHT AND NIMBLE AND IS A BLAST TO RIDE… MILEAGE WILL CONTINUE TO INCREASE AS I DO RIDE THIS BIKE..IT ALSO HAS DYNA COILS AND IGNITION,ACCEL 8.8 PLUG WIRES AND K&N AIR FILTERS, THERE ARE A FEW BUMPS AND BRUISES ON THE PAINT AND PAINT PEELED ON FRONT FENDER, BUT PRESENTS VERY WELL AND GETS LOTS OF COMPLIMENTS..THE CENTER STAND HAS A SMALL PIECE MISSING AS SEEN IN PICTURE, TIRES ARE ABOUT 75% NEUTRAL LIGHT IS NOT WORKING,INSIDE OF TANK HAS NO RUST, BUT THERE IS SOME RESIDUE FOM OLD FUEL,I INSTALLED INLINE FILTERS AND IT SEEM TO BE GETTING CLEANER EVERY TANK OF FUEL I RUN THROUGH IT..ALSO I WOULD RECOMMEND A NEW GAS CAP,,,PLEASE LOOK AT PICTURES CLOSELY AND ASK ANY QUESTIONS YOU MAY HAVE, THANKS AND GOOD LUCK BIDDING..

The seller has also helpfully posted a video of the bike running: 1986 Moto Guzzi V65 Lario Start Up and Walk Around

The V65 Lario came fairly late in the production-cycle of these smaller twins.  Despite a familial style and configuration, they shared few parts with their bigger brethren, so be careful assuming parts availability will rival the larger Guzzis.  But take idiosyncratic handling into account and ride your sweet little Guzzi on a Sunday afternoon.  Be happy your friend didn’t lose the really cool key these Guzzi’s came with.  Watch the revs build on that gorgeous, white-faced Veglia tachometer and smile.  You certainly won’t see yourself around every corner, and the styling of these 80’s machines is finally starting to be appreciated.

-tad

1986 Moto Guzzi V65 L Side

1981 Moto Guzzi Monza for Sale with 99 Original Miles?!

1981 Moto Guzzi V50 Monza R Rear

Moto Guzzi is famous for its big, agricultural v-twin machines.  But in the late 1970’s, they introduced their smaller displacement alternatives to the bigger sport and touring machines.  Although big bikes have always been popular in America, where motorcycles are often a luxury purchase, Europeans often find smaller bikes appealing, owing to sometimes high taxes on big bikes and the extremely high cost of fuel.

The little Guzzi’s never sold very well here and are correspondingly rare now.  They’re neat little machines, well-finished adult bikes, not the cheap, plastic learners and commuters we often get as small-displacement bikes here in the states.

1981 Moto Guzzi V50 Monza R Side

These little 350cc and 500cc [and later 650cc] Guzzis are styled like their big siblings, but share virtually no significant parts with them.  The big twins are very conventional in design, but the small Guzzis feature relatively unusual “Heron” style heads that improved economy and simplified manufacturing.

The V50 Monza was a true sportbike, just one with a fairly small engine.  45bhp isn’t all that much to play with, but the bike is relatively light, handling is excellent, braking very good, and the shaft drive very un-agricultural…

From the original eBay listing: 1981 Moto Guzzi V50 Monza for Sale

Up for auction is this practically fresh from crate 1981 Moto Guzzi V50 Monza with fewer than 100 miles on her.  The original owner purchased this bike from his local dealer in June of 1981. Yet after just a few enjoyable outings on his new Guzzi, he was diagnosed with an illness that kept him from riding.

He held onto the bike hoping to one day be able to enjoy it. Thus, it was kept with fresh fuel, a battery tender attached and on special lift so the tires would not touch the garage floor…

Just this year I acquired the Monza, turned on the fuel, the choke and the key, pressed the starter and she fired up immediately. After a warm up on the stand, I changed what looked like brand new oil. Since, I have topped up the tires, and changed out the brake fluid. A quick detail has been given to the bike and I have ridden it about 10 miles.

I believe this Monza is as nice and close to uncrated condition, without being restored, as you will find anywhere in the world.

1981 Moto Guzzi V50 Monza Dash

This bike presents us with a dilemma: the little Guzzis are great, affordable and stylish machines that happen to be great motorcycles to put miles on.  So when you’ve got one with so few, it seems a shame to destroy the originality by riding it.

But what else do you do with such a fun little machine?

-tad

1981 Moto Guzzi V50 Monza R Front