Tagged: Italian

Little Starling: 1967 Moto Guzzi Stornello Sport for Sale

1967 Moto Guzzi Stornello Sport R Side

Characterful little bikes like this don’t really exist anymore: today, 125’s and 250’s are starter bikes and commuters, designed to offer maximum value and a dash of style and color. But under the skin, they’re designed and built as cheaply as possible, and often look pretty nasty if you look too closely.

1967 Moto Guzzi Stornello Sport Dash

Make no mistake, the Stornello or “Starling” in Italian, was designed to be built cheaply, but, like many small Italian bikes of the 50’s and 60’s, although designed as practical, affordable transportation, still managed to infuse some style, class, and quality.

1967 Moto Guzzi Stornello Sport Seat

Equipped with lower bars, a racing seat [here replaced with a solo saddle], cut-down fenders, lightweight wheels, and increased fuel capacity, the Sport version of the little Stornello produced a bit more power than stock, a thundering 8hp from the 123cc motor. That may not sound like much, but the long-stroke, undersquare engine made good torque in the best Guzzi tradition.

1967 Moto Guzzi Stornello Sport Engine

From the original eBay listing: 1967 Moto Guzzi Stornello 125 Sport for Sale

All original accept horn and rear view mirror. Finish and all body parts with original patina clear coated. All mechanical components completely gone through. Engine: complete rebuild including Valve guides, valves, piston, rings, sleeve honed, new wrist pin, new kick start return spring, complete gasket set, cases buffed and detailed. Motor starts on first kick every time, all electronics work. Aftermarket turn signals added for safety. Tires are ok and original. Single saddle is correct and original from Italy but original American long seat is included. Not many of these in the US and this one turns heads. Current Indiana Title, plated

Condition: All original as found in barn, completely disassembled cleaned and assembled with original barn rust spots, all fender and case rust was treated and clear coated to preserve the look. Tank perfect, no rust, no clear coat. Italian seat and parcel rack has been added but original large seat is included. New wiring harness, lights and turn signals added for safety, original 6 volt system. Engine complete top to bottom rebuild, piston, rings, wrist pin, value guides, valves, kick start return spring and carb. Cases and cylinder buffed and detailed. Exhaust original all the way back. I am the second owner, found this bike in a barn in Ohio where it had been sitting for the past 20 years

1967 Moto Guzzi Stornello Sport Front

With a “Buy It Now” price of $3,000 for such a sweet little piece of history, although those turn signals would have to go: a nice set of small, black LED signals would do the same job, draw less current, and be far more subtle than the bits currently fitted. A very cool bike for a pretty low price.

-tad

1967 Moto Guzzi Stornello Sport L Side

The Icon: 1977 Ducati 900SS for Sale

1977 Ducati 900SS R Side

Ducati’s follow up to their 750 SuperSport, the 900SS was introduced in 1975 and produced in much higher numbers than that earlier machine. It featured the controversial “square case” engine designed to fit in with the range-wide restyle penned by famed designer Giorgetto Giugiaro. While his automotive designs are, without a doubt, some of the most beautiful of all time, his motorcycle designs were far more controversial, although the angular look of the cases does not significantly detract from the lines of the bike.

1977 Ducati 900SS Engine

Engine internals were simply an evolution of the earlier L-twin, although with displacement bumped to 864cc. Shift was moved to the left side of the bike to satisfy US requirements and tastes, along with a quieter exhaust, now happily replaced with a set of barking Contis! In 1979, Ducati fitted a set of cast wheels that are obviously an improvement in terms of weight, but many purists prefer the wire wheels seen on this earlier example.

1977 Ducati 900SS Dash

From the original eBay listing: 1977 Ducati 900SS for Sale

I decided to list one of my precious Ducati Bevels, for selling consideration I have this gorgeous and very rare 1977 Ducati 900SS, silver and blue. This particular year and model is most sought after because of the wire wheels , color combo, solo seat and kick start. 

Bike looks great, way above average for its year and I am sure whoever is interested is most familiar with all the particulars about these magnificent machines. I just had the shop do the service, carbs, battery, fluids, brakes and tires all taken care. Very well preserved this bike is set up for riding, not just displaying, everything works just as should, bike was definitely enjoyed by the previous owners but very well taken care, no leaks, no funny smells or noises.  I occasionally ride it to shows or motorcycle gatherings and it puts a smile on my face each time, the looks, the sound and the crowd it attracts is hard to match . The bike is not a museum piece , or flawless condition, there are dents, nicks, paint chips, but no accidents or major defects. 

I took some close up photo with all major body parts so you could see the condition of the paint. The poor OEM quality Ducati used in 70’s is very well documented and unless bike was kept inside is impossible to avoid the cracks in clear coat that eventually translates in paint chipping or fading. The decals were all water transferred over the clear coat and that did not help either, every one of these Ducati suffer from same problem. I am no expert and since i don’t know all its history I can’t tell what is original and what is not but i can assure you this bike is the real deal, wheels, fork, shocks, Conti exhaust, 40mm Dellortos, all correct.

Check the VIN on motor and frame, listed with the registry.

Bike stats easy and runs very well, comes with CA title (previous owner, never cared to transfer the title since I ride it very little and did not want to add another owner since I only had the bike for short period of time)

1977 Ducati 900SS Fairing

It’s important to note that, as the seller mentions, many of the cosmetic defects visible on this bike are a result of poor finish from the factory, and unless the bike has been restored, flaws like this are nearly unavoidable.

Other than some peeling decals though, this looks like a very worthy example of the breed, and one of the most iconic sportbikes of all time.

-tad

1977 Ducati 900SS L Side

If You Have to Ask: 1975 MV Agusta 750S America

1975 MV Agusta 750S America R Front

While many sporting motorcycles from Ducati, Moto Guzzi, Norton, and Triumph sometime featured crude detailing and haphazard fit-and-finish, the MV Agusta 750S America was a premium product with a gorgeous, sand-cast four-cylinder engine at its heart. While four-cylinder engines would eventually be associated with mass-produced “Universal Japanese Motorcycles” in the late 1970’s, MV Agusta’s was a marvel of sophisticated, race engineering. The cams were driven by a straight-cut geartrain that ran between cylinders two and three and the engine is actually narrower than a Honda CB400’s.

1975 MV Agusta 750S America L Front

The America bumped the displacement of the transverse inline four to 787cc and 75hp and, true to its name, the gearshift was on the left and the brake on the right. Unfortunately, it retained the 750S’ heavy shaft drive, although Magni did produce a chain-drive conversion for the bike.

With a 560lb wet weight, the shaft drive, and a very exclusive price tag, this wasn’t a bike for race-track antics. It was a sophisticated, elegant bike for well-heeled fans of MV’s racing heritage and it excelled in that role, as reflected by their value today.

1975 MV Agusta 750S America Tank Detail

From the original eBay listing: 1975 MV Agusta 750S America

Magnificent machine. Sounds, runs and rides awesomely. Truly one of the greatest experiences in classic motorcycles.

This same bike actually featured on CSBFS back in 2012. The racing decals and “elf” logos may not be to everyone’s taste, but I’d expect they’re relatively easy to remove. I’ve seen 750’s with both wire wheels and cast wheels in magnesium or silver, but never with yellow-painted wheels. Red and yellow are a good color combination, although they’re a bit garish on an MV. They may not be to everyone’s taste, and I wonder how they will affect this sale. With a starting bid listed at a shocking $75,000 there are no takers as yet, but with plenty of time left on the auction, I’ll be curious to see if any buyers step up to the plate.

-tad

1975 MV Agusta 750S America R Side

Classic Roundcase: 1972 Ducati 750GT for Sale

1972 Ducati 750GT R Side

As always, range-topping sportbikes create a halo-effect and drive showroom traffic but, in the end, it’s lower-spec machines that keep the lights on and put food on the table. The 750SS may have been the sexy poster child for Ducati in the 1970’s, but that bike’s rarity and uncomfortable riding position means that the more mundane 750GT is a less expensive, far more practical proposition.

1972 Ducati 750GT L Front

Sharing frame and basic powertrain with the sportier Sport, the GT was designed as a real-world motorcycle, with relatively comfortable ergonomics. Interestingly, neither the GT nor the Sport actually featured the now universal Desmo heads and made do with regular valve springs. Valve springs, while less sexy in theory, make for easier and less costly maintenance. Luckily, the iconic bevel-drive and tower-shaft arrangement features on all of Ducuati’s “L-twin” engines of the period, so you can still help your mechanic afford that new addition on his home if you don’t like wrenching on bikes yourself.

1972 Ducati 750GT L Side Rear

The early “round case” models like this one command a premium compared to later models with restyled bits. There’s little functional difference between the two, other than the usual evolutionary changes, but the look of the original design is considered much more elegant, and they command higher prices.

1972 Ducati 750GT Dash

From the original eBay listing: 1972 Ducati 750 GT for Sale

Runs and drive great. clean AZ title, 750S751085, engine number 750683. 26246 on odo, but history of actual mileage unclear. steel gas tank professionally lined with caswell. fresh paint, frame just powder coated. new tires. fenders and exhaust rechromed . rear fender has been shortened (I didn’t do it). instrument pod solid, but shows cracks. electronic ignition and everything electrical works, including the charging system. wiring not pretty, could use a new wiring harness. side stand will swing up closer to exhaust, just didn’t move it enough when I put it on the center stand for the pictures. pictures don’t do it justice. the bike is stunning in person.

1972 Ducati 750GT R Side Engine

Plenty of time left on the auction, although there’s no activity so far. The bike is in very nice condition, with fresh paint on the tank and frame, but $18,000 seems like a pretty high starting point for an auction to me, so we’ll see how this progresses as the week unfolds.

-tad

1972 Ducati 750GT L Side

Bruiser from Down Under: 1981 Laverda Formula Mirage for Sale

1981 Laverda Formula Mirage R Front

While currently located in New Zealand, this Laverda Formula Mirage has a very American sensibility. In spite of their accents and the fact that they drive on the wrong side of the road, enthusiasts in New Zealand and Australia have more in common with gearheads here in the US than they do with European riders. The wide-open spaces found Down Under lend themselves to the same afflictions that plague us here: big, stupid horsepower and straight-line speed.

1981 Laverda Formula Mirage Controls

Built by Slater Laverda in the UK, masterminds behind the original Jota, the Formula Mirage was powered by Laverda’s famously charismatic and durable three-cylinder engine. It featured a distinctive, one-piece fiberglass tank and seat unit that looked sleek, but significantly limited fuel capacity, which in turn reduced the range of the already thirsty triple. Several folks online also commented on the steeply-sloped seat unit that sees passengers steadily sliding forward into the rider. A bonus on a hot date, not so great if you’re give your buddy a lift to pick up his bike from the mechanic…

1981 Laverda Formula Mirage Dash

From the original, very brief, eBay listing: 1981 Laverda Formula Mirage for Sale

Laverda Formula Mirage, 1 of 14 built by Slaters. Astralites, Goldlines, rebuilt motor . In excellent condition.

Although the seller mentions he believes only 14 were built, I did see mention in a Laverda forum by someone who claimed to have original Slater paperwork that stated 17 were actually created. Either way, it’s a very rare machine, and the parts are all there, even if the sum performs at a somewhat less-than-expected level.

1981 Laverda Formula Mirage Rear Wheel

Overall, in spite of character clearly in line with Laverda’s big, burly image, the bike met with decidedly mixed reviews, likely because the market had moved on, and riders had begun to expect both brawn and brains in their bikes: the “bigger, louder, faster, harder” mentality was just too primitive to appeal.

For collectors looking for a classic Laverda that captures the look and feel of the big, manly motorcycles from Breganze, this could be just the ticket.

-tad

1981 Laverda Formula Mirage L Rear

Tasteful Custom: 1973 Ducati 750GT Café Racer

1973 Ducati 750GT Cafe R Side

Built around an early, very desirable “round-case” L-twin Ducati engine, this bike is based on a 750GT. As such, it does not use Ducati’s desmodromic valvetrain and makes do with simple springs instead. While that may not be as sexy to say as “Desmo”, it means that maintenance will be simplified, although the bevel-drive and tower-shaft arrangement still requires some expertise to set up correctly.

1973 Ducati 750GT Cafe Engine Detail

Although it’s obviously of questionable wisdom to modify such a valuable classic, most of the cosmetic modifications look like they could be easily reversed, if the new owner decides to sell, or decides that they prefer a more original style. It’s also nice to see that the engine build includes VeeTwo parts: they disappeared for a while, but it looks like this Australian company is back in business, making hot-rod parts for bevel and belt-drive Ducatis.

1973 Ducati 750GT Cafe Dash

It’s so easy to screw something like this up, just by adding a splash too much color, or the wrong color. But the builder of this bike went simple silver. Period-correct style or not, I’m not a fan of the “750” decal on the side panels, but that’s easy enough to fix. And that Grimeca front drum looks great, although no Ducati twin I know of ever used a front drum… Otherwise, it’s a very nicely turned-out special.

1973 Ducati 750GT Cafe Front Brake

From the original eBay listing: Custom 1973 Ducati 750GT  

Custom café racer in the spirit of the prototype

I bought this Ducati in 2005 in the current condition with 20,609 miles on the odometer. Previous owner started with a standard 750 GT and had it extensively customized. Here is his description of the work done:

With custom paint, seat, linkage, front brake, clip-ons, side covers, and seat back, this is a one of a kind bike inspired by the prototype. The engine is completely rebuilt with improvements throughout, giving it more power and better response without jeopardizing reliability. The pistons are short skirt sport pistons from V-Two to raise the compression. The heads got lighter 7mm valves with better springs, new seats and guides. From the Carillo rods to the 36mm carbs, to the polished crank to the billet cams to the smaller stem valves, all things were considered with this project.

The bike is one of several classic bikes in my collection and it got regularly used on short trips. Bike runs extremely strong, starts with one or two kicks and is ready to ride. Nice chrome and paint with very few minor scratches.

No manual or tool kit. GA registration in my name. GA did not issue titles for bikes over 25 years old. Also have ex California title assigned to my name.

1973 Ducati 750GT Cafe L Rear

The seller also includes a more comprehensive list of modifications over on eBay, worth a look if you’re curious about this bike. The internal modifications sound like they’ve been well thought-out and the bike is ready to run, no matter what it looks like. Bidding is pretty active on this one, and up to $12,500 with the Reserve Not Met.

-tad

1973 Ducati 750GT Cafe R Side Detail

Road-Going Ducati Special: 1978 Ducati 900 NCR for Sale

1978 Ducati 900 NCR R Side

NCR has been building Ducati specials and tuning parts since their inception in 1967, although today their complete bikes are more high-end exotic lifestyle accessories for one-upping your Bimota Tesi-mounted buddies: their M16 is actually a massively-lightened Desmosedici that weighs in at 319lbs before you gas it up and is worth about as much as a nice suburban house. Because that’s just what the Desmo needed: a better power-to-weight ratio. Or, if your budget doesn’t quite stretch to the M16, their air-cooled M4 weighs 286lbs with oil but without gas…

1978 Ducati 900 NCR L Side Front

But NCR also built the Isle of Man Ducati raced by Mike Hailwood, so their vintage credentials are bona fide: they’re far more than another titanium moto-jewelry manufacturer.

This massively-faired bike from 1978 includes an aftermarket but very cool “gear-gazer” clear cam cover that displays the gear-drive for the overhead camshaft on the rear cylinder in all its glory. And NCR’s signature one-piece tank-and-tail bodywork also features a distinctive unpainted strip on the side of the tank so the fuel level is clearly visible through the translucent fiberglass.

1978 Ducati 900 NCR R Side Tank

That enormous fairing looks like it will provide plenty of protection for high-speed runs, and the bike appears to be in excellent condition. The seller’s description of this road-biased bike is very spare, but luckily very clear photos are included. From the original eBay listing: 1978 Ducati 900 NCR for Sale

Incredible opportunity to own a real NCR. Stumbled on this bike, along with a 1974 Ducati 750 SS, while at a Mostra Scambio, in Rimini, Italy December 2001. Extensive top end work by one of the best bevel drive mechanics in North America

1978 Ducati 900 NCR L Side Engine

This would really be an excellent moment for the seller to do a bit of name-dropping: vintage performance circles are relatively small, and I’m sure buyers would love to know who had their hands on this one. And what does “extensive top end work” entail? Are we talking maintenance or performance work?

1978 Ducati 900 NCR Cockpit

While in many cases, a spare description of a motorcycle simply implies that the seller assumes prospective buyers will know what they’re getting into, that isn’t necessarily true of NCR bikes: to my knowledge, none of them are really “stock.” NCR was always a race bike and parts manufacturer, the very antithesis of standardization, making valuation of this machine difficult. Although assuming the parts are the real-deal, anything genuine NCR is valuable, on top of the already desirable bevel-drive, desmo-head Ducati drivetrain.

Bidding north of $15,000 with plenty of time left on the auction, so we’ll see where this ends up.

-tad

1978 Ducati 900 NCR Shop

Sleek in Silver: 1979 Bimota SB3 in the UK

1979 Bimota SB3 L Side

Early Bimotas really straddle the “classic” and “modern” sporbike eras and helped set the stage for the mass-produced machines that followed. Prior to bikes like the SB3, monoshock suspensions and fully-faired bodywork were really only seen on factory racebikes, and it’s hard to comprehend just how exotic the SB3 was at the time. Although the price was steep, it was virtually the only game in town, until the advent of the GSX-R750.

1979 Bimota SB3 Front

I’m a big fan of red frames on bikes, assuming the frame is actually worth emphasizing and on these early Bimotas, the frame is basically the whole show. Not that the aerodynamic, quick-release bodywork isn’t worth a look, but it’s just the icing on the cake. The integrated signals are another nice touch, something that didn’t really find its way into widespread use until the past couple decades.

1979 Bimota SB3 L Side Rear Naked

But that frame was the only game in town if you wanted top-shelf race technology for the road. Wrapped so tightly around the virtually stock Suzuki GS1000 engine and transmission that powered the bike, it was designed to separate into halves to allow the powertrain to be removed for servicing. And the very trick concentric swingarm pivot and countershaft sprocket kept geometry and chain tension constant throughout the swingarm’s entire range of movement.

1979 Bimota SB3 Engine

At 483 pounds wet, the bike’s main advantage in terms of straight-line performance came from a massively reduced weight compared to the original Suzuki. While suspension was compromised for the road by being far too stiff, according to contemporary tests, it’s easy to argue that wasn’t really the point, and anyone able to afford a Bimota could certainly pay to have the forks and shock retuned to allow for road use.

1979 Bimota SB3 L Side Rear

From the original eBay listing: 1979 Bimota SB3 for Sale

 The SB3 has always been a very rare bike: just 402 were built worldwide.

This one is Number 9 (frame number 0009) and was the first SB3 in the UK.

Its history & provenance is fully documented – it’s a very special bike, with just 4 owners from new; two of those from the same family (Bought new, sold to son-in-law, then sold on to its third owner, then repurchased by the original owner before being bought by my father in law).

It comes with the original bill of sale (see photos) and a letter to the DVLA – when it was returned to its original number plate after having had a private plate – which describes its history very clearly. A photo of this letter also attached.

It has covered just 6,332 miles from new, with a documented change of speedo under warranty at the first service, hence only 5,045 miles showing on the clock today.

This very bike was the one displayed at the Earls Court bike show in 1979, and then road-tested by Motorcycle News.

(We have a copy of the issue of MCN in which it was reviewed – see pictures)

This SB3 was already in lovely original condition when my father-in-law bought it in 5 years ago, but he still carefully stripped it down and treated it to a full cosmetic restoration – having the frame and fairing professionally resprayed, and the Marchesini wheels re-painted in the original gold.

It has always been garaged, and is in outstanding original condition as you can see from the photos. There are a few marks on it here and there, so am not going to describe it as being in concours condition, but it’s pretty close!

I could go on an on about this bike, but no doubt if you’re looking at this advert, you’ll already be aware of what it is, and the fact that its likely to be many years before another SB3 comes up for sale.

A truly unique opportunity to own a rare piece of superbike history.

Viewing can be arranged in Colchester, Essex.

Collection only. Payment by BACS or cash on collection.

1979 Bimota SB3 L Side Naked

Well, that last bit could present a problem. I assume that, by “collection only” he means he won’t arrange shipping, but you could just see it as an opportunity to head to Colchester on vacation! One of my favorite color schemes is silver and red, so it’s no surprise that I really like this bike. Although at £19,995.00 [approximately $30,787.00] it is far out of reach for me for the time being.

-tad

1979 Bimota SB3 R Side

 

 

Baby Sport: 1971 Ducati 450 MK3 Desmo for Sale

1971 Ducati 450 Mk3 Desmo R Side

For fans of Ducati’s sports singles, this Mark 3 450 Desmo is the top of the heap, and shares that gorgeous orange-yellow paint with the bigger 750 Sport. But, unlike that model, the 450 Desmo features Ducati’s desmodromic system.

1971 Ducati 450 Mk3 Desmo L Tank

While “Ducati” and “desmodromic” have become synonymous today, the system didn’t feature on all of their models until the Pantah motor of the 1980’s, when that motor was used in both large and small displacement applications. The system was mostly used on range-topping sports models like the Super Sport twins and Desmo singles. Other manufacturers, including Mercedes, have used similar systems, but Ducati’s design was created by the revered Fabio Taglioni and first applied to their 1956 125cc race bike.

1971 Ducati 450 Mk3 Desmo R Side Engine

Ironically, the system probably had more practical benefits when it was introduced on Ducati racebikes in the late 1950’s, although the precision tuning does still have some benefits. If you’re not familiar, a desmodromic system uses cams that both open and close the valves to eliminate valve float and allow for very precise tuning. The fact that the valves are being closed in a controlled manner, instead of just being slammed closed as fast as a spring can manage, permits steep cam profiles that wouldn’t normally be practical.

1971 Ducati 450 Mk3 Desmo Dash

In 1968, Desmo performance was introduced to Ducati’s roadbikes on the Mark 3 250 and 350 bikes, with the 450 available in 1969. Interestingly, the 250 and 450 models were far more flexible on the street: the 350 had a much more highly-strung demeanor and was ready to go racing, nearly right out of the box.

1971 Ducati 450 Mk3 Desmo Front

From the original eBay listing: 1971 Ducati 450 MK3 Desmo for Sale

VIN 700287  Engine DM450 S/D 456907

The most desirable of the single Ducati’s in very good straight conditions, restored about 20years ago and rarely used since. Italian historic register and still with its first original Italian registration documents.

Ride and collect!

Bike is currently located in Italy, 33080 Roveredo in Piano (Pordenone) but i can get them delivered all around the World at cost, no problem.

We can supply US contact as reference.

1971 Ducati 450 Mk3 Desmo R Tank

This same seller has had a number of really nice bikes up for sale on eBay of late that we’ve featured, including that very, very cool Guzzi racer from last week. I’m not sure if he’s liquidating a collection, but his bikes are amazing, and he’s popped into the comments to answer questions from time to time, so don’t hesitate to ask questions at the original listing or in the comments section.

-tad

1971 Ducati 450 Mk3 Desmo L Side

Budget Italian Racer: 1982 Moto Morini 250

1982 Moto Morini 250 Race Bike L Side

Another unusual racebike up for sale this week, this time a very funky Moto Morini 250 with an enormous, wind-blocking fairing. I’m not sure if this would increase or decrease the bike’s top speed, but it should make it easy to relax on long straights, tucked into the bubble of still air behind it. You could maybe read a magazine…

1982 Moto Morini 250 Race Bike Dash

With no real modern presence, at least in the US, Moto Morini is still the forgotten Italian marque, although they survived well into the 1980’s in Europe. Part of the reason for their relative obscurity here is their insistence on small-displacement bikes: they never got bigger than 500 until they were resurrected in 2004.

1982 Moto Morini 250 Race Bike Front Drum

But Morini, in spite of modest top speed performance, always built sophisticated bikes with impressive handling. The 72º v-twin was designed to be compact and smooth, and put power though a six-speed gearbox. This innovative engine utilized traditional pushrods to operate the valves, but used a toothed belt to drive the camshaft instead of a heavy, noisy chain and the engines famously featured Heron-style heads that gave excellent fuel economy and simplified manufacturing.

1982 Moto Morini 250 Race Bike R Engine

From the original eBay listing: 1982 Moto Morini 250 race bike for Sale

Dunstall tank, Grimeca hub, Akront front rim, Takasago rear rim, Paioli forks, Adj Progressive shocks
Fitted with Moto Morini 3½ top end.
Reportedly raced at
Sears Point in the early 80’s, and clearly set up for racing, with wired nuts and bolts, and engine breathers connected to overflow bottles. No battery, lighting, or brake lights, etc, (Bike runs without battery)
Appears to have been in good shape when stored with gas removed from tank and carbs. Engine sounded good upon start up (see video below from last summer) After this run it was drained of fuel and back into storage
Bike will need work to make it roadworthy, tank sealing, paint, tires, mechanical work, tuning etc.
This bike is not a show bike. It was set up purely for functionality, not looks.
I’m not an expert in this field so use your own judgment and research before bidding.
Clear title in my name (secured by bond)
Mileage listed for ref only, actual miles not known
Stand not included in sale
Bike must be picked up within 30 days

1982 Moto Morini 250 Race Bike Rear Hub

While this is very cool, it is obviously modified from stock, with heads from a 3½ [350cc] bike, so be careful to read the rules of whatever race series you plan to enter this in. Conveniently Morinis came with both electric and kick start, so this bike simply ditches the heavy, unreliable electric system and goes with the lighter kick that eliminates the need for a battery.

-tad

1982 Moto Morini 250 Race Bike R Front