Tagged: TZ750

Origin of the Species: 1973 Yamaha TZ750 Prototype Road Racer #001

1973 Yamaha TZ750 L Side Front

The second of three very rare Yamaha TZ750 race bikes available this past week, this 1973 model is claimed to be a rare prototype machine. Fans of both ClassicSportBikesforSale.com and RareSportBikesforSale.com have proclaimed all three of these machines to be overpriced, but you can’t argue that they are very cool and very valuable motorcycles regardless of their asking prices. Yamaha’s TZ750 was all brawn and no brains, a power-mad beast of a bike that packed 140hp into a sub-400lb package good for 185mph, with basically terrifying handling when it was introduced. But that power came with reliability, and the TZ dominated AMA racing for years in spite of its lethally bad manners.

1973 Yamaha TZ750 L Side Engine3

This example is supposedly a “prototype” numbered #001, although I’d definitely want to consult with a TZ750 expert before plunking down my hard-earned cash. It’s certainly in impressive cosmetic condition and will undoubtedly look amazing on display. Early TZ’s used a twin-shock rear suspension as seen here, although later bikes moved on to a more modern monoshock set up that vastly improved handling from “scary” to “less scary” as the bike struggled to cope with increased power from the significantly revised powerplant that went from 700cc’s in early bikes to the full 750cc’s in the name.

1973 Yamaha TZ750 Bare Engine

From the original eBay listing: 1973 Yamaha TZ750 Prototype #001 for Sale

This is the rare only one built by the Yamaha Race department. It was finished in 1973 for Kel Caruthers to inspect and make final changes for the completion of the production TZ700/750 for release in 1974 for Daytona and European distribution.

What you see are some of the salvaged parts that were intercepted on the way to the crusher and torch. The main part being the frame and swing-arm stamped 409-100001.

This bike remained in the hands of factory rider Sadeo Asami until it was returned to Yamaha USA in the late 70`s. 

I sat in storage until 2012 when I was able to purchase the parts. A good friend and I spent 3 years bringing it back to as last race condition and another year to where it is now.

This is the bike that changed racing history.

1973 Yamaha TZ750 L Side Engine2

I would be curious, and I’m sure the seller can tell you, whether or not it runs. From the description, it sounds as if it does. This would obviously make a beautiful display piece and centerpiece to a collection, but racing machines I feel should always be kept in running condition, even if it’s only for parade laps and demonstrations. The Buy It Now price is set at $78,000 which, as stated previously, is very high for a TZ750. They’re pretty rare, but 600 were made and, even accounting for the attrition that naturally occurs during racing, it’s possible to find these regularly circling tracks in vintage racing events.

Regardless, I’m happy to see the bike offered up for sale, so we can all drool over it and think about how many extra kidneys we’d need to grow in order to be able to afford it….

-tad

1973 Yamaha TZ750 L Side

Bee Sting: 1975 Yamaha TZ750B for Sale

1975 Yamaha TZ750 L Front2

Looking like the world’s angriest bumble bee, complete with four stingers, this Yamaha TZ750B race bike is ready for a new life, terrorizing tracks in vintage racing classes. And “terror” is probably the right word: with as much as 140hp, the TZ750 was very fast and exceptionally reliable, although the concept of handling was still in its infancy and a “good-handling bike” was any motorcycle that exhibited cornering or straight-line behavior that didn’t involve a terminal death-wobble.

Early TZ750s may not have qualified…

1975 Yamaha TZ750 R Naked

The earliest liquid-cooled two-stroke fours look suspiciously like they were built up from a pair of 347cc parallel-twins to make the TZ700. The later 750cc engine that debuted in 1975 supposedly shared no parts at all with the smaller machines and was essentially a bored-out 500 Grand Prix engine. Power predictably overwhelmed the bike’s rudimentary handling and primitive tires. Early machines used a twin-shock rear, although the frames were eventually updated to a more modern monoshock design as seen here: this particular bike was obviously ahead of its time and uses a rare Kanemoto frame, according to the seller.

1975 Yamaha TZ750 L RearFrom the original eBay listing: 1975 Yamaha TZ750B for Sale

Show Winner – Fresh Rebuild – Race Ready. Very Unique Early TZ750; C&J Mono-Shock Frame equipped, Raced in the 1976 and 1977 Daytona 200!

C&J made 4 special TZ750 mono-shock frames for Erv Kanemoto in the mid 1970`s. They were ridden by Gary Nixon, Freddie Spencer, and Gary Fisher. This particular unnumbered chassis was built using a 1975 TZ750B donor bike, and made it into the hands of AMA Pro rider Cory Ruppelt; he finished in the money in the 1976 Daytona 200 Roadrace on this bike.

Original period equipment includes: Morris Magnesium wheels, Lockheed front calipers, early Vesco fairing, and silenced crossover chambers. 
Modern KR series Dunlop racing tires, D.I.D. endless chain, and Boysen reeds make it track-worthy.

Rebuilt motor has 1 hour track time; tear-down inspection just completed. Un-numbered cases. Genuine TZ750D Master Cylinder just installed – carbs, ignition, controls, forks and C&J modified bodywork are original TZ. The bike is near exactly as raced in the 1970’s including paint. Has been preserved for 30 years on display before being brought back to a rider. Unrestored from the 1970’s, in “as-raced” condition.

The seller also includes some on-track video of the bike doing some parade laps here.

1975 Yamaha TZ750 L Rear Naked

Many classic racebikes are non-running display pieces with too much history for the owners to risk a crash, or because they cannot afford the upkeep on a rare, non-production machine more than forty years old. Luckily, this particular bike comes with period looks, unrestored paint, and a refreshed motor that looks like it’s ready to rock.

-tad

1975 Yamaha TZ750 R Front

Barn-Find Racer: 1975 Yamaha TZ750 for Sale

1975 Yamaha TZ750 L Side

A combination of big-bore, two-stroke power and rapidly evolving handling made the Yamaha TZ750 the bike to beat during the 1970’s on racetracks in the US and abroad. Early bikes shredded tires and scared the bejesus out of even experienced riders, and twin-shock rear suspensions gave way to mono-shock setus as power increased from “plentiful” to “terrifying.”

1975 Yamaha TZ750 Gauges

The original bikes actually displaced 700cc’s, exactly like a lashed-up pair of 350 twins might and, although the four used much of what Yamaha had learned racing their 350, it shared no parts with its little brother, and appears to have been based on a bored-out version of their 500GP machine, making it very exotic indeed, although handling on the first bikes was fairly suspect.

1975 Yamaha TZ750 R Front

This early example uses a more conventional twin-shock rear suspension: later bikes featured thicker tubing and a much improved monoshock suspension that redirected suspension forces to the steering head and created a much more stable platform for the four-cylinder, two-stroke animal lurking under the bodywork. That liquid-cooled lump featured reed-valves for a wider powerband, likely around 90hp here, although later bikes put a slightly terrifying 140hp through the bikes six-speed box. Combined with decent handling from the later monoshock frames, it made the TZ750 the bike to beat during this era.

1975 Yamaha TZ750 R Side Engine Detail

The story behind this bike is included over at the original eBay listing. It rambles a bit, but makes for an interesting read: 1975 Yamaha TZ750 for Sale

Now I really had to think about how far down do we take this project, we could do a frame off complete restoration or just clean?

Well the answer is; They Are Only Original Once! We just cleaned it and got it running. Now the old guy told me that even though it was in storage in his garage that he would once a year spray WD40 in the cylinder and after inspecting the lower end I believe him. We removed the head and cylinders to inspect the lower end, we also scoped as much as we could. The crank looked perfect and clean. So we cleaned the piston rings and wrist pins and put back together.

Please note that we have only run this bike a couple of times so we are mixing the fuel very rich, that is why there is so much smoke in the video. Also the video was shot on May 6 of this year and it was the first and only ride on this bike. My tech is the rider and it stalled on his first run because he was trying to find first gear. The video (we will be posting soon) and pics speak for themselves.

As you review the pictures note that the bike still has most if not all of the original safety wire from its race days. Also note that is bike has most if not all of the original factory cable and hose clips or clamps. These items are usually missing on most of the TZ bikes I have seen.

I did not try to mount the fairing as it seemed to fragile from sitting in the garage but is mostly complete.

Some Notes:

The frame number is 409-000327

The Engine number is 409-000327

Bike has a clean green Michigan Title

Original paint bike (I would say about 98% original as I did repaint the head, exhaust and some misc bracket).

Original safety wire still intact from the track

All original cable clamps and clips

All parts that had to be replaced are OEM Yamaha (even the hose clamps)

Rebuilt Stator from Rick Shaw, the owner at Rick’s Electrics

Rebuilt CDI Box in original case from England

New exact duplicate radiator from England

New grips and shift rubber

Rebuilt all brake calipers w/ OEM Yamaha parts

Removed head & cylinders, cleaned rings and wrist pins, scoped and inspected crank. Crank and lower end was perfect.

Cleaned carbs

New tires, however they are road tires not track tires.

Race fairing with new replacement wind shield (this windscreen will need some alteration however was the only replacement available). 

1975 Yamaha TZ750 Tank Detail

And no, your eyes aren’t playing tricks on you: that is a rear-view mirror, tail light, and a headlight on there: one of the previous owners set the up for road use! Kids, don’t try this in California… And yes, although it is a big rough around the edges, it does run, as can be seen in this video here. I love how hard-edged that two-stroke crackle is here, sounding pretty far-removed from the typically agricultural sound of an idling smoker.

1975 Yamaha TZ750 Engine Detail

Just 111 TZ750’s were built during 1975, making each and every one a highly-desirable collector’s item. Bidding is very active on this bike, and is currently up around the $25,000 mark with plenty of time left on the auction. I’d expect the buyer to return this to track-only specification and hopefully take it vintage racing, but I can imagine the temptation to take it out on the road might be very hard to resist…

-tad

1975 Yamaha TZ750 R Side

What a Teaze 1974 Yamaha TZ750A

I’m not old enough to remember these bikes circling the race tracks so I can’t paint a verbal picture of how awesome that might have been. I can however imagine it based on videos I’ve seen and the short list of these I’ve seen in person.  When I think of rare, beautiful and fun, this bike is definitely one that comes to mind. The seller leaves a long and thorough description so I’ll stop blabbering here and you can read for yourself what’s up with this bike.

1974 Yamaha TZ750A for sale on eBay Motors

From the seller:

1974 Yamaha TZ750A: Engine & Frame Number 409 – 000245.

HISTORY: The Yamaha was originally owned by Steve Morehead, the well known Ohio rider. It was raced in 1974 at Talledega and Daytona (practice only) and then acquired by Scot Erickson who also rode it in 1974 at Ontario Motor Speedway, California. In 1975 Scot rode it at Laguna Seca and in lesser races at later dates. He sold the bike to me in 1989 and it has been recently restored.

ORIGINALITY: Matching numbers are stamped on the engine and frame. Both the left and right cylinder barrels have “347cc 40900” cast on the rear. See early style piston with rearward inlet slots in picture 16. The wheel rims are stamped “Daido Japan 30 B 2.15 x 18 409F” & “Daido Japan 30 C 3.000 x 18 409R”. Tires are Goodyear Motorcycle Road Racer 3.25-18 & 3.50-18.

The Yamaha was restored carefully following the TZ750 Parts List for authenticity and is original except for the following:

1) The rear of the frame has been modified for a “Laid Down” shock absorber installation. The footrest and rear brake lever mounts have been modified to suit. The shock absorbers are replacement Marzocchi 1 (N.2Kg/cm.cm.) The swing arm is unchanged.

2) The rear brake caliper mounting arm has been modified, as shown in picture 19.

3) Exhaust Pipes 1 & 2 and also 3 & 4 are each attached with small welded plates. See picture 13.

4) The fuel tank has been modified for “Quick Fill” and the installed petcock has (2) spigots.

5) The chain guard and rear fender are missing.

CONDITION: The Fairing, Fuel Tank, Seat, Front Fender, Frame and the black attaching parts have been professionally painted to the highest standard.

The seat was recently upholstered.

The Front and Rear Brake Master Cylinders have been serviced with new Cup & Master Cylinder Kits.

The right side rear wheel rim has a small crack and both tires are in poor condition.

The left side shock absorber spring has some scuff marks as shown in the last picture.

COMMENTS:

1) The mileage is unknown and the listed mileage is an approximation.

2) The cylinder bores were lubricated during storage.

3) I have never had the engine running.

4) Engine compression, gear selection and clutch operation are normal.

5) Engine coolant and hydraulic brake fluid are not installed.

6) A few “non-Yamaha” metric fasteners have been used.

7) The fasteners have not been correctly torqued and are not wire locked.

8) The Yamaha does not have a Title.

9) The Yamaha has been stored in temperature controlled conditions.

10) Please do not ask for a BUY IT NOW price. The Yamaha will run the duration of the auction.

I have seen two of these in person and they rough, raw race ready machines. Keep in mind that if you are thinking of racing this you’ll want to make a complete check of all bolts inside and out. The seller mentions some bolts aren’t torqued. If you want to put this in your living room and sit on while watching the Isle of man TT invite me, that sounds fun. Just keep in mind I can be very convincing and we might end up taking turns ripping this Teazer down your street.

~Buck

The Real Deal: 1975 Yamaha TZ750 Not for sale.

For Sale: 1975 Yamaha TZ750

Update 5.9.2011: The owner has noted that the bike is not for sale. Sorry for the misunderstanding. -dc

Forget your literbikes and converted trackday weapons. THIS is what you really need to be the star of that next track day you attend. No worries about taping over lights, and no concerns whether or not your bike is fast enough to hang with the A Group. Mix up some oil, give it a bump start and HANG ON!

From the seller:
One of the greatest racers of all time, a legendary racing machine of the 70s and 80s. I’m guessing it weights around 375 lbs with about 170bhp. It’s in very good condition for its age. Currently still being raced. This collector bike will appreciate in value.

Found listed on a Florida area Craiglist, this TZ sure looks the business. With 750cc of snarling two-stroke power, the TZ750 was the Yamaha privateer’s dream. With bikes and parts available from your local dealer, you too – with a little bit of capital – could go racing in the big boy leagues. Sadly, two-stroke racing is coming to an end here in the US, but some of the monuments to the sport still remain.

Nobody ever said that racing was cheap – and this is no exception. The asking price for this beauty is $28,500 – not counting transportation costs. Still, given that there is not insurance and registration hassles, it is still a cheaper and more potent track day bike than than new Bimota DB7R you’ve been lusting over…..

For more info on this one, click the link and jump over to the listing. Good luck, and tell ’em you saw it on CSBFS!

MI