Category: BMW

Restored to Perfection: 1975 BMW R90S for Sale

1975 BMW R90S L Front

Today’s BMW R90S is the quintessential German sportbike: fast, stable, and reliable, but just a little bit uptight and unassuming. Or it would be unassuming, if not for that very vivid 70s paint job… By the 1970s, a major shift was well underway in the motorcycling world. Postwar shortages in many markets meant that, throughout the period immediately following World War II, cars were simply too expensive for many people to afford and motorcycles were often used as basic transportation in their place. But by the 1960s, the tide had begun to change and, more and more, motorcycles were seen as luxury items or toys, especially here in the US.

1975 BMW R90S R Rear

Generally stodgy image aside, BMWs had always been involved in racing but, by the 1970s, they felt they needed reach customers outside the lucrative, but steadily aging “old man” demographic. BMW’s traditional customers were aging out, and BMW wanted to reach out to a new crop of riders who were looking for something like a Ducati, but maybe with some comfort thrown in. The Germans may have been trying to create their own SuperSport with the R90S, but that practical Teutonic DNA comes through pretty strongly in both the form and the function.

1975 BMW R90S Dash

That dose of practicality in no way diminishes the performance available and the bike was very competitive in AMA racing immediately after it was introduced. High-compression pistons and performance carburetors meant that the proven pushrod engine, here bumped to 898cc, made 67 very flexible horses that could take the R90S all the way to 125mph, although braking power was never much to write home about.

1975 BMW R90S L Rear

Today’s example looks terrific and appears to be quite the labor of love. From the original eBay listing: 1975 BMW R90S for Sale

This is a perfect restored numbers-matching BMW R90S. Many collectors like a bike in original condition unrestored. This is perfect for somebody who put it in his man cave and enjoy looking at the bike or showing it to somebody. But after 40 years it would not be fun to drive it. All the rubber, bowden and seals and much more thinks getting dry brittle leaking and brake. This one is ready to drive and it is as new as it can be.

I am a 60 year old German engineer and be working on BMW’s my whole life as my hobby and for fun. I am selling this one because I have too many toys and I am downsizing for my retirement. This one is restored to perfection. Look at all the pictures it tells the story. I was working over 2 years on this bike and one thing lead in to another because as a perfectionist nothing is good enough.

Here is a list of what I have done. I am sure this list is not complete but you getting the idea:

  • Frame powder coated.
  • Wheels polished hubs bead blasted new stainless spokes.
  • Every screw on the bike is new and stainless.
  • All the rubber and I mean all what has any rubber in it or on it is new tires, seals, bowden, seat, footpegs and so on.
  • Wheel bearings and brakes are new
  • Every aluminum part on engine, gearbox and final drive is bead-blasted and assembled with new seals
  • Cylinder heads with lead-free valves
  • New pistons and oil rings
  • New clutch complete with spring plate
  • Carbs are overhauled and sealed for over $500
  • New seat complete with pan from Germany
  • Instrument cluster overhauled for over $600 and set to 0 miles
  • This was a low millage bike to begin with and in a very good shape
  • New paint and pin striped by a pro for over $2000.
  • New petcocks and fuel cap.
  • New exhaust system complete.
  • And so on…
  • It comes with the original toolkit, shop rag, metal air pump and manual
  • And I have a box full of receipts what I be afraid off to add up.
  • There is a lot of money in this bike.

1975 BMW R90S Parts

Bidding is very active on this bike and already north of $12,000, with plenty of time still left on the auction and the Reserve Not Met. That’s certainly premium money for an old BMW, but it sounds like you’re getting about as close to a brand-new R90S as is possible, barring a lifetime of tracking down NOS parts and building one from scratch. Certainly, the seller makes a great point: an unrestored, barn-find bike would likely require a ton of work to make it run correctly, or would require constant attention as the little bits mentioned deteriorate and fail. This bike is virtually perfect and ready-to-roll. If you have the cash to spend and want an R90S, this looks like a good choice!

-tad

1975 BMW R90S R Side

Teutonic Trackday Terror: 1973 BMW R-Series Endurance Racer for Sale

1973 BMW R-Series Endurance Racer L Front

BMW’s boxer twins have long been associated with old men, heated grips, and hard luggage. But there have been racing Beemers as long as there have been Beemers and the quirky, shaft-drive “air-head” bikes are durable and can be extremely quick when properly prepared. This particular R-Series bike includes a veritable who’s-who of German race and top-shelf performance parts, with Silent Hektik twin-plug points-less electronic ignition [they also do Guzzis!], a Werner Fallert deep oil sump, restoration work by Hinrich Hinck, and uprated Lockheed brakes to replace the reportedly unimpressive stock front stoppers.

1973 BMW R-Series Endurance Racer R Rear

The original listing also mentions Gus Kuhn, whose name is proudly displayed on the side of the bare-metal tank. Gus Kuhn was a British racer, tuner, and dealer during the 1950s and 1960s. Although he died in 1966, Gus Kuhn Motors successfully raced Nortons and BMWs, eventually becoming one of the top BMW dealers in the world. It’s not clear from the listing if this is an actual Gus Kuhn machine or one simply intended as a tribute.

1973 BMW R-Series Endurance Racer Tank

From the original eBay listing: 1973 BMW R-Series Endurance Racer for Sale

Gus Kuhn Endurance, Marzocchi Lockheed GP Kroeber, Silent Hektik ignition, short piston engine overhauled

We have bought this Endurance Racer in Great Britain. Together with our friend Hinrich Hinck we decided to restore this very nice classic racer. We wanted to get as possible a high degree of originality. But we also wanted to build a very good racing machine and together with the experienced Hinrich Hinck we have done it.

The result: engine overhauled by BMW engine specialist Israel with short piston, Fallert oil pan,  Lockheed GP brakes, Marzocchi front fork, 18 inch rim, Kröber rev counter, aluminium fuel tank, Silent Hektik ignition, double spark,

Now it is ready to race for classic events.

1973 BMW R-Series Endurance Racer Engine Detail

Please note that the bike currently resides in Germany but, since it’s in no way road-legal, at least there’s no question as to whether or not it can be registered here in the US. There’s plenty of time left on the listing, with six days still to go, and bidding has not hit the reserve. At just over $3,000 that’s no surprise. Given the components, preparation, and that gorgeous bare-aluminum tank, this should be worth double that figure, assuming the right eclectic buyer can be found.

-tad

1973 BMW R-Series Endurance Racer L Side

Eine Sehr Praktische Fahrrad: 1975 BMW R90S for Sale

1975 BMW R90S L Side Front

By the early 1970’s BMW was saddled with a very stuffy image that was in real need of an update. BMW’s were unsexy. They were bikes for old men. If story that sounds familiar, maybe it will help to think of today’s R90S as the S1000RR of the early 1970’s.

In the immediate postwar period, manufacturers proliferated and churned out cheap transportation by the bucketload, so Europeans could get to work efficiently and affordably. But by the late 60’s things had begun to shift and, with the rise of the Japanese, who were churning out cheap, highly sophisticated motorcycles by the bucketload, BMW was facing a bit of an identity crisis, much in the way that Harley Davidson has in recent years, with their fanbase slowly aging out of motorcycles entirely.

Or just buying cars instead.

1975 BMW R90S Side Rear

The result of BMW’s re-imagining was this stylish machine. It was based on BMW’s proven platform, with the usual host of hot-rod updates to improve performance. A pair of Dell’Orto carbs and higher-compression pistons were fitted, and the 898cc pushrod, OHV engine was a bored out version of the earlier 750 and the engine featured fairly oversquare dimensions. It added up to 67hp and, put through a five-speed transmission, meant a top speed in the neighborhood of 125mph, a very fast neighborhood at the time. For a big sportbike, the BMW was relatively light at 474lbs wet.

1975 BMW R90S R Side Engine

The stylish bikini fairing allowed BMW to compliment the usual tach, speedo, and warning lights with an analogue clock and a volt meter, while twin discs provided improved stopping power over other BMW models, although that wasn’t saying much, and even these upgraded brakes were considered the R90S’s weakest characteristic.

 

1975 BMW R90S R Side Rear

As with Moto Guzzis of the period, the image of the shaft-driven BMW was more touring than sport, but the R90S was successful in competition: in the USA, the American Motorcycling Association organized a new race series for “Superbikes” and the R90S placed first and second in the very first race. But for all the sporting competence, BMW couldn’t completely shake their practical image, and it still featured low-maintenance shaft-drive, would take a set of hard luggage, had impressive range, and could comfortably cruise all day at 80. It was supremely competent, but still just a little bit uptight…

From the original eBay listing: 1975 BMW R90S for Sale

First titled 5/29/1975 in Michigan

Stainless spokes, good tires and battery, K&N air filter

Original large tool kit/roll, tire pump and owners manual

Great running -excellent engine idle

Serviced at BMW Daytona Beach 

Always garaged and covered: no damage, no crashes, no issues

Clock is not working-may be disconnected from battery

Have 2 keys and 2 key blanks, 2 oil filters

Runs like new

1975 BMW R90S Gauges

Geez, “BRAKE FAILURE”?! That’s a terrifying warning light! With 26,000 miles on the clock, this example is very clean and relatively low-mileage: these can and do rack up serious, continent-crossing distances quite regularly. Bidding is up to almost $8,500 with the Reserve Not Met. These are on the rise in terms of value, but I wonder where this one is priced, and whether or not the seller is aiming a bit too high, too soon…

-tad

1975 BMW R90S L Side

Jack-Of-All-Trades: 1975 BMW R75/6 for Sale

1975 BMW R75 L Side

Bikes like BMW’s R75/6 represent a much more do-it-all imagining of the sportbike, before race-bred ergonomics and peaky powerplants made them impossibly focused and of far more limited utility than they are today. And although BMW’s have, until the S1000RR, reveled in a sort of “older gentleman’s express” image, they’ve always been able to get a wiggle on when asked, although it was often suggested that you phone ahead if you needed any significant braking done…

1975 BMW R75 L Side Cockpit

But it’s important to remember that part of BMW’s continued success was their early realization that the future of motorcycles was exactly in that upmarket trend away from practical transportation, and they adjusted their product to match that need. And then, instead of chasing every new styling and technological trend through the 70’s and 80’s, they became more than just motorcycles. They were BMW’s.

Introduced in 1974, the /6 models featured a front disc brake and an interesting master cylinder that was tucked under the tank to provide protection during a crash that was operated via a short cable. The 749cc engine was basically a bored-out version of the smaller bikes’ “airhead” flat twin units and gave 50hp with a top speed of 110mph.

1975 BMW R75 R Side Engine

From the original eBay listing: 1975 BMW R75/6 for Sale

The bike is in amazing condition but it is over 30 years old. I has a scratch on the tank. The tach needs to be replaced. Otherwise the bike is in great condition! But please ask any questions and I’m happy to answer in detail or get a picture. There are basic nicks that just occur with time but nothing major other. The ones on the tank are the most noticeable.

This has been my 2nd rider in Brooklyn for over 5 or 6 years.  It was rebuilt and purchase from AutoBahn Kraftwerks who are AMAZING at what they do.  The bike has been routinely maintained in Brooklyn by Peter at Moto Bogataro, I’ve owned a few airheads and he is the best mechanic I’ve ever worked with.  Love, care, passion and pure knowledge. 

It has been stored in my garage and never kept outdoors.  It starts on first click unless of course it’s really cold then it may take one or two extra.  

It needs a little bit of a wash, I will do it this weekend actually and have it detailed.  🙂  There is no rust AT ALL, that mud is just a puddle I ran over comes right off!!!  Will update photos if I can in time. 

The engine is super powerful, responsive, such a blast to drive, great weight balance, comfortable, and just a pleasure even two up. 

Most of the work was done by AutoBahn but I did update the rear shocks, have new tires, worked on brakes, maintained oil change schedule.  An s-fairing could be added to it, all hook up are on the bike. 

I am selling it because I no longer have my apartment with the parking space in 2 months and cannot afford to pay for an indoor lot for two bikes. 

 

1975 BMW R75 L Side Tank

I am familiar with Moto Bogataro, one of the shops he mentions in Brooklyn. They do have an excellent reputation and do lots of work on old Laverdas and Guzzis as well.

This particular bike doesn’t show all that well in the pictures, but the seller claims it just needs a bit of cosmetic TLC. I do believe him that it’s just mud spatters showing on the pipe and not rust, as the same material is obviously there on the seat as well. But the front tire is also looking pretty low and I’m not sure why you wouldn’t take a moment to correct those issues before photographing your bike for sale on eBay. With a Buy-It-Now price of $5,700 it’s not exactly cheap, but you’re looking at what appears to be a very solid example of an extremely classic sport motorcycle.

-tad

1975 BMW R75 Cockpit

US Market Beemer: 1969 BMW R69US for Sale

1969 BMW R69US L Side

While BMW certainly made conservatively-styled, even stodgy-looking bikes they were, much like the majority of BMW’s modern offerings, “gentleman’s express” sportbikes. Powered by a 594cc version of their classic “flat” twin and shaft drive that could push the bike just north of “the ton” and cruise at 90mph all day long, the R69S was the ideal motorcycle for wide-open spaces and it was correspondingly popular in the US.

1969 BMW R69US Clocks

That popularity in the US market actually led to the specific model you see here. While the standard R69S used Earles forks that had advantages over early telescopic forks in terms of performance under braking, but were relatively heavy, the “US” versions featured telescopic forks instead of BMW’s more typical Earles forks, and deleted the sidecar mounting lugs.

Although this change was designed to modernize the looks of the bike and appeal to the US market, the change worked well and even saved a bit of weight compared to the Earles fork models.

1969 BMW R69US L Side Rear

From the original eBay listing: 1969 BMW R69US for Sale

I am selling this outstanding bike for a long-time friend; an internationally established collector of rare BMW motorcycles.  This R69US is completely restored to near perfect in Granada Red.  The bike will bring you years of pleasure whether for show, riding or just its investment value.

As always I reserve the right to end this auction early as the bike is for sale in other venues and may sell before this auction ends, so bid your highest price early.  This bike is located in Blackhawk California.

1969 BMW R69US Engine

The styling of the R69 is conservative, but these look great in bright red, rather than the conservative BMW black, and I’m a huge fan of bar-end turn signals. At $15,000 with no takers as yet, this may be a bit rich, although you certainly would be hard-pressed to find a more polished vintage bike in terms of both looks and riding experience.

-tad

1969 BMW R69US R Side

1980 BMW R100 Cafe Racer for Sale

1980 BMW R100 Cafe R Front

As often as people hack “cafe racers” together these days, it’s surprising how often such a simple idea goes wrong. In an era when the aftermarket was in its infancy, and not much was available to increase the speed of your bike, or to make it look more like the bikes your idols were racing, you often took things off your motorcycle.

To go faster, simplify and add lightness.

1980 BMW R100 Cafe L Side Rear

And while the original “Ton-Up Boys” built their bikes for speed, current café racers are, let’s face it, more concerned with image than outright performance. If you want to go fast and don’t have much cash or have a do-it-yourself mentality, you’re much better off buying a well-used GSX-R and thrashing the hell out of it on road or track.

1980 BMW R100 Cafe L Front

So bikes like this are really about owning a cool old bike that looks and sounds right, that mixes vintage feel with some modern concessions to function: clip on bars halfway between the top and bottom triple may look pretty tough, but who the hell wants to ride that?

1980 BMW R100 Cafe Dash

This bike though, gets things mostly very, very right, with very classy ivory white paint and a and I’m not sure that classic half-fairing has ever looked so right on a motorcycle. This is based on either the R100/7 or the sportier R100S, although the ad doesn’t specify. Both were powered by BMW’s sporty, reliable 980cc horizontally-opposed twin that was flexible and basically vice-free.

1980 BMW R100 Cafe L Side Engine

If you’re building a bike to meet those criteria, the BMW “airhead” models are the perfect foundation: they’re mostly very affordable, much more reliable than a British twin, parts are readily available, they handle well for a classic machine and, maybe most importantly, supply a classic look and feel of a big twin clattering away beneath you.

From the original eBay listing: 1980 BMW R100 Café Racer

Turn-key bike, ready to ride now, and was just serviced by licensed BMW dealer. Very nimble and fun to ride, and has great visual presence.
Bike starts up easily, runs well, and sounds awesome.
Prior owner did the following work:

  • Ivory White paint with black pin striping, 3-4 coats of two-part clear coat.
  • New BMW badges for tank.
  • SuperTrapp Dual Exhaust, tremendous sound, clean, no rust.
  • Original seat pan, with custom shaped and covered seat done professionally, with brushed aluminum trim kit.
  • Cafe Racer Half fairing (small crack at bottom, barely visible).
  • Windscreen by Zero Gravity.
  • Clip-on bars.
  • New rubber grips.
  • New rear tire, front has 80% + tread.
  • Valves and end play adjusted.
  • Forks cleaned, lubed, and rebuilt.
  • New Transmission fluid, brake fluid.
  • Splines lubed.
  • New oil and oil filter, along with oil pan gasket and valve cover gaskets.
  • Bike has Mikuni carb upgrade.
  • Bike is gorgeous, but this is not a concourse example.
  • Mileage is in my opinion greater than that reflected on odometer.

If you can sit through the overproduced, Ken Burns-style slideshow [or just skip it], there’s some good riding footage of the bike in there to give you a feel for the bike’s character:

If you’re building a bike that needs to be ridden every day, sound good, and look right, the BMW “airhead” models are the perfect foundation: they’re mostly very affordable, much more reliable than a British twin, parts are readily available, they handle well for a classic machine and, maybe most importantly, supply a classic look and feel of a big twin clattering away beneath you.

1980 BMW R100 Cafe R Side Petcock

Aside from the plastic bezels and dash sourced from the original bike and those slightly questionable “BMW R100” badges, I really like this bike, and I think it would make a great daily-rider. Bidding is active on this one, but at just $4,050 and with The Reserve Not Met, I think this one has a ways to go, since a bone-stock example would likely fetch that.

-tad

1980 BMW R100 Cafe L Side

 

1975 BMW R90S for Sale

1975 BMW R90S R Rear

Earlier this week, we featured a very nice R100/7 with a bit of café style that made it look like the earlier R90S, racier sibling of the more conservative “Slashy” bikes. My new term for the R60/2, R75/5, etc bikes. Just made it up: feel free to use it.

The wonderful thing about old BMW’s is that their handling and competence is all out of proportion to the on-paper specs and unlikelyness of the powertrain combo. You’d expect them to be pretty slow and clunky, but, as Pirelli likes to tell us: “power is nothing without control.”

1975 BMW R90S L Front

Japanese bikes of the period routinely blew their European opposition into the weeds in terms of outright power, yet somehow folks kept buying and riding the European marques so often featured on this page. Probably because they lived long enough to buy new ones and all those young hotheads on their Kawasaki H1’s died at the first serious corner they came to.

And considering how uncomfortable and uncompromising the Latin racers of the period were, it’s hard to imagine you could have speed, handling, and comfort in one package: introduced in 1974, the R90S placed first and second at the very first AMA Superbike race ever held.

1975 BMW R90S Dash

From the original eBay listing: 1975 BMW R90S for Sale 

Over $ 25,000 dollar today’s money spent by its NASA Engineer owner. The major improvements include Re-engineered engine, Harden boars & pistons, and the compression is 175 PSI (instead of usual 130 PSI), Dual plugs heads with BOSCH Blue H1 performance ignition coils, DYNA electronic pointless ignition system, PRIDMORE Lighten flight wheel, PRIMORE inlet manifolds on the original DELORTO Cabs, ALPHA BET black chromed free flow 2 in to 1 muffler, BMW Oil cooler & Deep Pan, Porsche designed CPM Magnesium “6” spokes wheels with rear wheel air cooler, enforced swing arm, BMW kick start and new Odyssey Gel Battery, Front fork legs have double braced San Jose fork braces, PRIMORE Springs in the forks and top off with SAN JOSE Triple clamp. San Jose enforced supported swing arm and RENO chromed ride off stand, KRAUSA Engine wrap crush bar, Metzler tires, expensive stainless braded front brake lines. Original tool kit, keys and owner manual are included.

The seller has helpfully included a video: BMW R90S walk-around, start up, and ride away.

1975 BMW R90S R Engine

Always happy to embrace unusual solutions, BMW mounted the R90S’ front brake master cylinder below the fuel tank and connected it to the lever via a short cable, preventing damage in the event of a crash.

It’s no garage queen, but this seems like a pretty nice example of a very collectable Bavarian bike, the choice of an intellectual rebel with a cause. I’d ditch those ridiculous “CYCLONE” stickers as soon as I could, but otherwise, this looks to be the perfect classic useable classic, combining “sport” and “touring” in equal measures.

-tad

1975 BMW R90S L Tank

 

Reader Suggestion: 1978 BMW R100/7 Custom Cafe

1978 BMW R100 7 L Side Rear

No longer quite the undiscovered gem they were, BMW’s “airhead” boxers still provide real value to the classic enthusiast. Although the rarer, sportier models like the R90S command real dollars, the more pedestrian bikes were made in sufficient numbers that, unless you’re concerned with collectability, still offer amazing bang for the buck.

Their durability probably doesn’t hurt, either: BMW’s longitudinal flat-twin is really the coelacanth of classic motorcycles, since it was knocked off by the Russians [Ural] and then that knock-off was knocked-off by the Chinese [Chang Jiang] and are still being produced to this day.

If a 1940’s engine can still provide reliable, if somewhat sedate motive power for a modern-ish motorcycle, imagine what the additional thirty years of development found in a bike from the 70’s will add! This 1978 BMW R100/7 may look pretty stock, but has been professionally repainted and restored to better-than-new condition, with upgraded components where appropriate.

1978 BMW R100 7 R Side

From the original listing: 1978 BMW R100/7 Custom Cafe for Sale

“Frame-off” powder coated, black respray, clear coated with hand painted pin striped bodywork, rebuilt motor and trans, lightened flywheel, light weight wrist pins, newer clutch, new t.o. bearing, rebuilt carbs, new Hoske mufflers, new rubber parts, new Metzeler Lazertec tires, BMW wire wheels, Dyna elec. ign.,RS solo seat, R90s handle bar, completed 2008, 1200 miles since build, new brake service Fall 2013, build by BMW restoration specialist in the Twin Cities (more info upon request)

These are very practical, reliable bikes, aside from braking that reportedly requires Johnny Carson-like levels of precognition to use effectively: even period reviews were less than stellar… Although I’d imagine updated pads or a swap to more modern components might help there and not degrade the looks much. On the upside: the rest of the package is hard to criticize: power, handling, and comfort are all there in spades.

$8,750 seems a bit steep for an R100/7, but with only 1200 miles on it since a thorough update, you’re getting what looks to be a very nicely turned-out machine. If you’re okay paying a bit more for something of quality, this could be your ride.

-tad

 

Pair of Motorsport BMW

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It is interesting to see how two sellers with the same motorcycle describe what they have on offer. Here is a case were two sellers of two 1978 BMW Motorsport Edition R100RS describe their bikes.

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From the seller of this 1978 R100RS

1978 BMW R100rs in original condition w/7128 miles. This is a Motorsport Edition in “police white” w/”rennsport red” fairing & blue/blue/red pinstriping. This is a Texas titled motorcycle and has been kept in a climate controlled environment for most of it’s life. It has a new Yuasa battery & fresh rubber. This bike also has matching white panniers & a “dual” seat to go with the solo saddle. I have all manuals that were issued w/the bike and the original BMW tool kit. The solo seat pan has a small crack in the fibreglass as shown in photo and the right battery cover has a small stain at the upper right corner. A tiny chip in the rear of the solo seat cowling can also be seen in the video. This bike would make a nice example for a collector as it has very low miles and runs

…For those who know or care this is 1 of 200 CFO bikes produced by BMW in 1978.  40mm carburetors & 40mm exhaust.

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From the second seller of this 1978 R100RS

Being offered here is my 1978 R100RS Motorsport, the bike I thought I would never sell. I bought this bike from a gentleman that had prepared the bike mechanically for a cross country trip that never happened. I have since done a frame off restoration on this beauty over the passed three years. Here is a list of work done.

Professional repaint using the correct Glasurit paint colors for this model. The original hand pinstripes were left intact,taped over for paint, then a clear coat was applied.

Frame was sandblasted and powder coated black. New oem rear grabrail.

All the nuts and bolts on the frame are stainless steel.

New complete exhaust system.

The seat is a new stock reproduction.

The speedometer and odometer have been rebuilt and set to the original mileage.

The clock and volt meter both function as do all lights and turn signals,even the turn signal warning buzzer works.

A new sealed battery installed last year.

Stainless steel front brake lines, calipers and master cylinder rebuilt.

Rear master inspected and cleaned  as well.

Lightened flywheel and new clutch.

Carbs rebuilt, including new floats.

I have new BMW handgrips on the bars.

Also included with the bike is the original tool kit, air pump, and cable lock.

I have a set of K75S handlebars and new BMW handgrips to go with the bike if the buyer wants them.

New Metzler Lasertec front tire this season, ear Lasertec has around 1500 miles on it.

Now for the disclosure. he previous owner had the carb tops chromed and started a dual plug conversion but never finished. he paint has worn off the edge of the voltmeter and the windscreen has some deeps scratches in one corner. There are a couple of small chips in the side covers. You can see this in the pictures.

The bike runs and rides beautifully. The mileage stated may change as I still ride the bike.

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The R100RS was the top of the line for BMW, and the Motorsport RS is a special edition of a special bike. The R100RS was new to 1977, and when they first rolled into the hands of riders, they came with 40mm Bings and 40mm Exhaust taps. Soon afterwards the exhaust was reduced to 38mm and given more restrictive mufflers. These bikes were stamped “CFO” and this was to certify that they would pass California, Florida and Oregon emissions requirements. So I am wondering about the first sellers apparent conflicting statements about the bike. R100CS, CFO and 40mm/40mm.

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I am sure that there are people who have been able to unravel the nature of these special editions. The R100RS Motorsport Edition was limited to 200 bikes and only offered in 1978. The seller of the second bike gives the vin number, and I found a vin decoder which shows it was manufactures as a R100RS on 1977/10 which would end up on the dealership floors for 1978. The seller of the “R100CS” Motorsport does not include a Vin number. The Motorsport Edition appears to have been a “Badge” edition with only special paint to distinguishes it from the others RS’s. But again, there is a lot of information that I could not find, so do your homework when getting special editions of special bikes. It is nice that you have two to choose from, but hurry there has been active bidding, and one is ending soon. BB

1937 BMW R5

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When Max Fritz first designed BMW’s flat-twin engine in 1921, BMW didn’t even make motorcycles. It wasn’t until 1923 that the first BMW engine rolled in its own BMW frame. In 1935 BMW made a change, it was the year that they added a second cam; now the left cam took care of the left cylinder, and the right cam took care of the right cylinder. With this change, a sportier BMW was created, and they went racing to test the new bike, in the dirt, over six days. This 1937 BMW R5 is now available for you to live the history.

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From the seller (as presented in the auction)

1937 BMW R5 frame#224420.Motor 196684 .Trans#113699.Cyl heads 504420 matching #.Speedo Viegel#376683.1.0 ratio Carbs #k37 waa3.Headlight lens DDR Ruhla EFA.Carco fuel taps.EFA horn #8416.2/2. Finned generator cover. Incorrect rear fender looks very corrct.MTR redone .Imported frome Hungary 20 plus years ago First time offerd ror sale in the USA.older rest. needs a little TLC .Not ran in awhile.

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The R5 first hit the road at the 1935 ISDT races in Germany. The factory team took the new engine in a new welded oval and conical tube steel frame. Previous BMW had been cradled by Art Deco pressed sheet metal frames. Though the rear end was still rigid, the front end had adjustable, oil dampened telescopic front forks. On a historical fun fact level, the R5 received a plunger rear suspension in 1937 for the factor race bikes. The same rear suspension would not show up in a production bike until 1952.

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It is a little difficult to determine what is there from the photos and description from the auction. The Amal-Fisher carburetors are specific to the R5 and are about the hardest thing to find in the world. If you do find they, they will cost you the equivalence of a small vacation home. Goggling the numbers the seller added after the word “carbs”, the first thing that came up was “old Russian Carb”. The fact that they say it was imported from Hungary will give other hints as to its condition and originality. Looking over the dark pictures, most of what you see, appears to be BMW related. Place you bid on this 1937 BMW R5 and start the adventure that is owning a pre-war European motorcycle. BB

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Not a R5 but a supercharged BMW entered in the 1935 ISDT

Not a R5 but a supercharged BMW entered in the 1935 ISDT