Category: Honda

Café Done Right: 1975 Honda CB750 for Sale

1975 Honda CB750 Cafe R Side

I try to stay away from posting up too many café-styled machines here, especially of the home-brewed variety. There’s nothing wrong with them necessarily, but the do-it-yourself vibe also leads to some half-cocked ideas and questionable engineering: take a half-decent Honda CB750, slap on a fresh coat of paint on the tank, flip the bars, fit a set of individual pod-filters and, voila! You now have a bike with probably less performance than the original and likely far less comfort as well…

1975 Honda CB750 Cafe L Side Rear

Introduced in 1969 as part of Japan’s opening salvo in the war for big-bike domination, the CB750 combined the sophistication and exotic wail of a four-cylinder with the durability of an appliance. Along with Kawasaki’s Z1, the CB brought sophisticated engineering to the masses. In recent years, these workhorse UJM’s [Universal Japanese Motorcycles] have become the darlings of a custom-bike scene tired of overpriced, fat-tired choppers with ubiquitous S&S twins and Baker non-unit gearboxes. Cheap to buy, with a wealth of parts to maintain and customize, cast-off Japanese bikes democratized the custom movement, although prices of even poor examples have been driven out of the basement, leading bourgeoning bike builders to search for less-expensive alternatives…

1975 Honda CB750 Cafe Dash

From the original eBay listing: 1975 Honda CB750 Cafe for Sale

Honda CB750 cafe racer w/ new black paint/gold racing accent stripes. Clear California title – runs and shifts with no issues – Front and rear drilled racing rotors, new handle bars, new mirrors, new seat pan, new upholstered seat, new gas tank emblems, new front & rear turn signals, new brake light, new oil & filter, new brake fluid, rebuilt (2) front and (1) rear calipers, rebuilt master cylinder, new speedo cable, new clutch cable, (2) new throttle cables, new reflectors and much more – feel free to contact me with any questions or to set up a time to inspect – thank you!

1975 Honda CB750 Cafe L Side Engine

This particular example caught my eye for the dual-disc conversion up front, an nod to performance and safety. Looking very much like a modern Triumph Thruxton, this is a pretty nice, rideable classic, although the seller wants a pretty penny for it, with an asking price of $6,500. There are three days left, so maybe make him an offer.

It isn’t perfect, but the CB750 is a terrific platform and this should give you Brit-bike looks and style without the headaches and leaked oil in the garage…

-tad

1975 Honda CB750 Cafe L Side

Show or Go: 1972 Honda CL350 AHRMA Racebike for Sale

1972 Honda CL350 Race Bike on Track

While race and track bikes tend to be built with “go” rather than “show” in mind, even at the highest levels, vintage racing is sometimes a different story. While there are plenty of lashed-up, rattle-can bikes on the classic circuit, there are also some really nicely prepped machines that look like they’d be at home on a custom build show, and this Honda CL350 definitely has one foot in both of those worlds.

Honda’s CL350 was introduced in 1968 and, much like the new Ducati Scrambler, was meant more as a fun, versatile streetbike than a real offroad machine. Americans love their dirtbikes, so the CL350 sold very well at the time, and its basic reliability means there are plenty of nice ones still around. They’re rugged, make decent power, and have a very classic look, making them popular today in both stock form and as the basis for café-style rebuilds.

1972 Honda CL350 Race Bike L Rear

Powered by a 325cc parallel twin with a chain-driven overhead cam, the CL350 put out about 33hp in stock trim. But there was plenty more to be had and the engine was both lightweight and very tough, with much of the bike’s overall weight coming from heavy-duty offroad-capable parts. This means that there’s plenty of weight to lose when building a dedicated streetbike or a roadracer like we have here.

1972 Honda CL350 Race Bike Engine Detail

From the original eBay listing: 1972 Honda CL350 AHRMA Racebike for Sale

The bike was built to a very high standard using the best components and lots of Italian “bling.” It uses the preferred CL350 frame (reinforced) which like the Honda CB350 version – has competitive advantages compared to the SL350 model frame.  It was also remarkably reliable. No DNSs and no DNFs during its one full season of competition! Add fresh fuel, battery and rubber and you’re ready to go racing with a very competitive mount!

I also used this bike myself to pass AHRMA’s Fast and Safe road-racing school at NOLA. This is an excellent track day bike! Or – a unique exotic for the collector who wants a special bike with real race “cred” that was built to an aesthetic level rarely seen on racing machinery.

Would be a great conversation piece as a static display for any private collection, restaurant or coffee shop …but I would prefer that this bike is acquired by someone who plans to continue its distinguished racing career.

This is a special bike that goes as good as it looks. Draws a crowd wherever it appears!

This is an well-maintained machine. The assembly / paint was expertly done in 2013. Beyond that, it does have the honest patina of actual racing action. It will require new rubber and a fresh battery.

Frame

Honda CL350 (high pipe, street-bike) was selected as the basis for this build. The frame (merely spot-welded at the factory) was “fully” welded during our build. All joints, attachments, pressings, perimeters, etc. were completely welded together for maximum rigidity.  Extraneous brackets were removed.  The steering head bearings were replaced with tapered roller bearings (All-Balls).  Swing-arm is stock.  Paint is urethane single-stage (no clear coat).

Brakes

Front brake was extensively tweaked by Vintage Brake. They did all their magic turning, backplate service and brake shoe matching magic to build these serious binders.  Front has Ferodo shoes.  Rear is NOS Honda CL350.

Suspension

Many thanks to Race Tech for their help, support, design & guidance.  Front forks are 1981 35mm Yamaha 650 twin with Gold Valve emulators and 80kg/m fork springs.  SL350 Honda triple clamps are used for the (larger) 35mm fork size.  Rear shocks are custom, fully adjustable Race Tech shocks.  They did the math based on the build sheet dimensions and superbly constructed them. Steering damper by Shindy Daytona.

Engine

Most internal parts are from Bore-Tech.  Racing Cam is from Megacycle along with their valves springs & lighter retainers.  New guides were installed.  A big bore, high compression piston kit from Bore-Tech was installed.  Stock crank (roller bearings).  Cappellini needle bearing / overhead oiling / oil filter setup to eliminate running the hardened cam in plain aluminum carriers. Cappellini supplied the trick oil cooler as well.  Degreed the cam according to Megacycle specs. Ignition is electronic and run off the crank versus the cam end.  Stock Honda clutch and gearset.

1972 Honda CL350 Race Bike R Side

The “SL350” the seller mentions in the first paragraph was introduced in 1969 and used a heavier frame more in keeping with legitimate off-road riding, but that obviously makes it less suitable for a track bike. This example uses the lighter CL/CB frame intended for street duty. The smaller Honda twins are, in general, very popular in vintage roadracing: they’re rugged as all get-out and are still very affordable, with maintenance and tuning parts readily available. Although it is possible to spend ludicrous amounts of cash building one to this level, that’s not really necessary, and you can still have a blast on something less polished.

1972 Honda CL350 Race Bike Tank Detail

As you can see from the close-up shots, this is a beautifully-prepared bike and, although the $8,900 Buy It Now price is very high for a Honda CL350-based anything, it’s probably worth that, considering the fabrication and care that’s gone into this build. As is often the case, you’re left with a bit of dilemma: do you risk trashing something this nice on track?

-tad

1972 Honda CL350 Race Bike Engine Parts

Street or Track: 1973 Honda CB500 Street Race Bike for Sale

1973 Honda CB500 Cafe R Front

Some bikes are rare by virtue of the fact that few were ever made. Others are rare simply because so few survive in anything like good condition. Others, like this Honda CB500 are one-of-a-kind, a common bike elevated to the ranks of rare and valuable because of the execution.

1973 Honda CB500 Cafe R Rear

Certainly, Honda made plenty of CB500’s, so they’re not rare in terms of how many were built. But in typical Honda style, most were used as transportation and then passed on, discarded, and caught in an ever-worsening spiral of less-sympathetic maintenance as they moved down the food chain to the bottom-feeders. Luckily, Honda’s line of four-cylinder motorcycles were built to last, and parts to rebuild them are plentiful.

1973 Honda CB500 Cafe Cockpit

While the seller refers to this as a “race bike” and the bike does appear to have some history that speaks to competition, it’s currently set up for street use, with a headlight, taillight, and rear-view mirror. The listing includes a thorough accounting of upgrades and prep work, including an overbore to 651cc’s and a set of bigger CB750 carburetors to help feed the hungry Honda. I’m not sure how the overbore affects racing classes, as bikes are generally grouped according to displacement and the modifications that have been made, although those twin-discs up front are a welcome upgrade, no matter how you plan to use this bike.

1973 Honda CB500 Cafe Rear

From the original eBay listing: 1973 Honda CB500 Race Bike for Sale

According to the previous owner, the bike was raced in F1 CCS vintage Classes in 2000 and rebuilt for the next season at the end of the year. It was raced in 02 in CCS WERA and AHRMA winning both LW and HW Vintage classes. At the end of 02 the motor was again rebuilt to its current state. In 2003 the bike saw a practice laps but was never raced again. The bike was sold to someone for their 64 birthday but to health issues his race days are over that is when I bought the bike. The bike has a clear title. The bike runs great and has no mechanical issues and dose not leak or smoke. When I bought the bike number cylinder was not hitting when for a good drive and it cleared up runs like race bike should. Things that have been done to bring this race machine to this standard

CB500’s are not especially rare or valuable, although prices for nice examples are being dragged upwards as Honda’s other four-cylinder bikes increase in value. However, this particular example looks like it’s been well cared for and treaded to significant mechanical and cosmetic upgrades that definitely make it worth a second look. With five days left and bidding just north of $5,000 it looks like I’m not the only one who thinks that.

1973 Honda CB500 Cafe Dash

As it stands, this CB500 is a very slick street bike, and that bare metal tank with leather strap look appropriately racy for posing at the coffee shop after a good ride down some winding back roads. If you plan to take “race bike” literally, make sure you read the rule book of the appropriate sanctioning body carefully. If you plan to ride this on the street, make sure you replace that hideous AutoMeter oil pressure gauge with something more appropriately vintage.

-tad

1973 Honda CB500 Cafe L Side

Boosted Classic: 1982 Honda CX500 Turbo for Sale

1982 Honda CX500 Turbo L Side

Here’s a bit of an odd duck: a cherished Honda CX500 Turbo! For a period in the early to mid-1980s, all of the major Japanese motorcycle manufacturers flirted with forced-induction, although it seems to have been a bit of a fad. The main advantage of a turbocharged motor is efficiency: some wasted exhaust energy is scavenged and repurposed to the production of more power, and obviously you can get much more volumetric efficiency with a turbo than you can with normal aspiration. But the benefits of forced-induction in a motorcycle are outweighed by the additional complexity they bring to the table, especially when a simple bump in displacement or revs might, at least in a motorcycle, provide the same power increase.

1982 Honda CX500 Turbo R Side Fisheye

But in the automotive world, the word “turbo” was all the rage, and bike manufacturers didn’t want to be left behind. Many of these early attempts were fairly crude, and while turbo lag and a big hit of power can be a rush in a car, they’re especially dangerous qualities for a bike. Porsche’s early 911 Turbo developed a reputation for lethality because mid-corner boost from the primitive turbocharging combined with tricky lift-throttle handling to surprise more than a few owners, testing their cars’ build-quality and crash durability as they headed off the road backwards.

Now imagine that same dynamic, on a bike leaned over at 45° on 130-section tires…

1982 Honda CX500 Turbo Dash

When Honda joined in on the craze, they did it with typical refinement, although their choice of a platform might seem odd at first. Instead of a signature sophisticated and smooth four-cylinder, they chose their almost retro-tech, slightly ungainly CX500 v-twin. But while the spec sheet for the CX500 looks low-tech, it was actually a very sophisticated design, with many thoughtfully designed aspects designed in: the pushrods were required by a slight twist to the angle of the heads so the carburetors didn’t try to occupy the same space as a rider’s knees, and the transmission spun counter to the longitudinal crankshaft to minimize torque-reaction to the shaft-drive rear.

1982 Honda CX500 Turbo R Fairing Detail

Most importantly, the engine was liquid-cooled and could easily handle the additional heat and pressure that the turbo would add, and the simplicity of the 80° twin left plenty of space for intake and exhaust plumbing. The resulting package was far from pretty, but with 19psi, the little 487cc motor put out 82hp and could push the bike north of 120mph. The bike also featured modular ComStar wheels and tubeless tires, a relative rarity at the time.

1982 Honda CX500 Turbo L Side Rear Suspension

From the original eBay listing: 1982 Honda CX500 Turbo for Sale

Well, you found it! My pride and joy. And if you are looking at this listing I can pretty much guarantee you already know alot about this motorcycle. Its super rare and hard to find. It has been in my possession since around August 2005. It appears by paperwork I have in the shop manual that I am the third owner and that it was originally purchased in CT.

This bike is in original condition with a few exceptions. I replaced the front brake lines with Galfer SS lines just this past weekend. Along with the new lines I did a complete rebuild of the front calipers, polished caliper pistons, new piston seals and dust caps, new pads, master cylinder rebuild, and of course new fluid. Also shortly after I got it the paint on the exhaust was chipping off on the “TURBO” shields. I removed the paint with intentions of painting it back black and never got around to it. Besides that this bike is stock and unmolested. Adult active duty military owned, kept in a climate controlled garage and was the Queen of all the bikes, always covered up and sheltered from the elements.

However, this bike is not perfect. It does have imperfections and most of them common to this model. A paint chip in the front fender, a scratch here and there, the crack in the right side fairing that is common due to the heat off the exhaust, a small crack in right front turn signal (cant see it unless your looking for it), Small imperfection in the windscreen, etc. Remember this bike is 32 years old!!! Also the bike was laid over in the garage by previous owner and probably contributed to the crack in the fairing. The left side battery compartment cover was cracked real bad when I bought her. I replaced it with an original equipment one soon after I bought it. There is a piece of gauge cluster foam gasket material that has slid down on the tachometer. It does not affect the function of the tach and I was going to replace but am scared to take it apart that far. I’ve tried to take pictures of all her imperfections and am representing the bike to the best of my ability.

Thats the bad, now the good. Bike has a new battery, original owners manual, shop manual (which I used to rebuild brakes), and runs like a top! I just rode this bike this past weekend with my dad and it still makes me grin ear to ear when the boost kicks in and the turbo gauge ramps up to max psi! It is definitely like no other bike I have ever had and I hate to see her go and hope the next person will appreciate her and take care of her as well as I have.

The CX500 was produced for only one year, and was followed by the more refined, slightly bigger CX650 Turbo. While ultimately a technological dead-end for motorcycles, the flirtation with turbocharging has led to a few very funky, affordable collector bikes, and many can be found in very nice condition if you poke around.

There are still a couple days left on the auction, although the reserve has not been met at about $3,000. It looks to be in very nice, original shape: the cracks are unfortunate, but speak to the originality of this machine and the bike is in otherwise very nice shape. The stainless front brake lines are a welcome touch and the bike appears to have had very careful maintenance.

1982 Honda CX500 Turbo Front Suspension

Turbocharged bikes were a bit of a gimmick at the time, but can be a real blast on the road: that lag and boost can be a bit of a pain if you’re looking at lap times. But on a back road, that rush of power can be a whole lot of fun! And modern technology that smooths power delivery, reduces lag, and improves safety might see the return of forced-induction to motorcycle manufacturing… Fun, collectible, reliable, and affordable, snap one of these up before prices shoot up: 80’s bikes are still a bit uncool, but these things tend to be cyclical [pun!] and interest is on the upswing.

-tad

1982 Honda CX500 Turbo R Side

 

Six Appeal: 1979 Honda CBX for Sale

1979 Honda CBX R Side

One of my favorite double-take bikes, the Honda CBX can appear at first glance to be simply just another 1970’s motorcycle. But even out of the corner of your eye, something looks off. A second look, and it all becomes clearer:

“Hmmmm… That’s an awful lot of engine up there.”

1979 Honda CBX L Engine

The 1047cc straight-six looked massive but was, in reality, not a whole lot wider than Honda’s 750cc four. But where that engine just about tucks into the complete package, that extra bit of CBX just hangs out on either side, a huge aluminum brick just barely surrounded by a motorcycle. With no radiator in front to block the view, the 6-into-2 exhaust is on full display, a polished metal pipe-organ monument to excess.

1979 Honda CBX Dash

While the straight-six GP bikes that inspired the CBX were light and lithe and packed their impossibly tiny, Swiss-watch mechanicals behind sleek bodywork, there was nothing subtle or sprightly about the CBX. Nearly 600lbs ready-to-roll with typically mediocre Japanese big-bike suspension, the bike shared nothing but engine configuration with its racing cousins. It was possibly this confused message that ultimately made the bike such a hard sell: a heavy, expensive bike inspired by racing but with absolutely no racing pretensions whatsoever? People did buy the bike, and lucky for us, treated them with care and respect, but they were not huge sellers at the time.

1979 Honda CBX R Front

Eventually, the CBX was updated with slab-sided styling and a monoshock rear suspension. It was less elegant, but much more suited to the bike’s real forte: fast touring.

From the original eBay listing: 1979 Honda CBX for Sale

Original 1979 Honda CBX, excellent condition with 17k miles. Original Paint and parts, there are aftermarket mirrors and an oil pressure gauge currently on it but I have the original mirrors and cap that go with the bike. Bike has never sat unused or in non running condition, it starts up easily and runs smoothly and perfect. No leaks, drips, or issues. That is the original seat and exhaust on the bike, there is one small rust spot on the left side exhaust, right side looks clean. There are no splits in the seat, all tabs on the side covers are intact. Bike is in excellent condition but it is 35 years old so not perfect. There is a small scratch on the back of the fender and a rub mark on the rear seat cowl. I am selling the bike for the original owner who is now 84 years old and can no longer ride. I personally rode the bike approximately 80 miles in the last couple weeks and it is an absolute joy to ride. I have the bike and clear title in hand. Bike is for sale locally, inspections are welcome and I will cancel this listing if the bike sells.

1979 Honda CBX R Engine Side

Interestingly, these were some of the first Japanese bikes to attain classic status. They were never really treated as the appliances,which makes sense: while Japanese sportbikes were typically marketed to, shall we say, less-than-sympathetic owners who used the machines’ mechanical excellence as an excuse to beat the living hell out of them, then forget them in a shed, the CBX was always a high-end, luxury grand touring bike.

1979 Honda CBX L Side Rear

With 17,000 miles on the clock and a Buy It Now price of $11,900, this seems like a pretty decent price for what appears to be a very good CBX: the black is a little bit faded, but the bike looks very sharp and original.

While the nearly $12,000 asking price might seem like a lot of cash, the value of these has remained relatively flat, while bikes like the Kawasaki H1 and Z1 have increased significantly over the past few years. I wonder if, with the CBX, we’ve hit that intersection between rarity and value, or if they’ll spike upwards again. I’m hoping not: they’re on my list of bikes to own.

-tad

1979 Honda CBX L Side

The Littlest Superbike: 1976 Honda CB400F

 

1976 Honda CB400F R Front

Introduced at a time when “middleweight” machines almost exclusively featured single and twin-cylinder engines, Honda’s little CB400F was really a “because we can” middle finger in the face of the competition, a demonstration of engineering mastery. Out of the box, it offered no performance advantage over twins, singles, and two-stroke alternatives: the increased weight of the package was only partly offset by the additional power that higher revs allowed.

1976 Honda CB400F Dash

But that was hardly the point. Introduced in 1975 and built until 1977, this was really a more sophisticated alternative to those bikes that offered a smooth, silky 408cc four-cylinder powerplant and a six-speed gearbox when bikes from Britain generally had only four speeds…

1976 Honda CB400F Tail

Unfortunately, that same complicated specification led to relative high prices for the class, and that resulted in poor sales. If you wanted cheap speed in a package that handled, Yamaha’s RD bikes were the ticket. But Honda’s little four offered a much more refined package. With a distinctive four-into-one header that clearly advertised the bike’s specification, the rest of the bike was relatively conservatively styled.

1976 Honda CB400F L Tank

While these weren’t especially fast right from the factory, legendary Honda durability allowed tuners to wring some fairly insane power from these for the race track… Tuner Kaz Yoshima built CB400’s to compete against much larger bikes and his could hit 130mph!

1976 Honda CB400F R Rear

From the original eBay listing: 1976 Honda CB400F for Sale

I’ve reluctantly decided to sell my 1976 CF 400F Super Sport. A recent total shoulder replacement and a dangerous increase in local traffic have curtailed my riding pleasure. In an effort to accurately describe this motorcycle, this description may get a little tedious, but I would rather give interested parties an in depth look than leave out any important details. If I left out any information, please let me know.

History: I purchased this bike in September 2005 from the original owner’s family in Tennessee. It currently has 11,008 miles, it has a clear South Carolina title, and the engine and frame numbers match. It has never been laid down. It is in very good to excellent mechanical and cosmetic shape. When I acquired the bike it was obviously very well cared for and the previous owners kept detailed records since the original purchase. During my ownership I have kept up regular service and maintenance, and always stored in a climate controlled garage. Documentation includes original written sales receipt from dealer, most maintenance records, original owners manual and warranty booklet (in original plastic pouches). Also included is original toolkit that appears to have 10 oil drain bolt washers still sealed in a plastic bag. Also from the previous owners is a binder that contained a xeroxed copy of a shop manual along with the maintenance records and parts purchased in it. There were a lot of OEM items supplied with the motorcycle when I bought it that I cannot find receipts for, but they were in OEM marked sealed bags. Some were used in subsequent maintenance described below.

Items Not Original: The battery is about 7 months old and sale includes a hardwired battery tender with quick connect. The original tires were replaced by my local Honda dealer at 10,890 miles, so they have 120 miles on them. The new tires are Bridgestone Battlax BT-45’s. I also had the original chain and sprockets replaced at the same time, all OEM replacements. The previous owners had replaced the master brake cylinder/reservoir (OEM). Included with my purchase of the bike was a new starter/kill switch assembly as the starter button had an intermittent short, a very common issue on these bikes. After installing it, the new assembly (and brake reservoir) did not match the patina of the old turn signal assembly on the left-side of the handlebars. In an effort to make them all match (they look like they have a bronze/black anodized coating), I replaced the left-side turn signal assembly (OEM) again with parts I acquired with the bike. The brake and clutch handles look more like a pewter finish so they didn’t need replacing, they are original and still have the original heavy plastic coating and rubber tips. I still have the old left and right assemblies that are included with the sale, but not the master brake cylinder.

1976 Honda CB400F Nekkid

The listing includes lots of additional history and detail. Keep in mind the “numbers matching” issue that the seller mentions in his listing, although it looks like this really won’t be any problem for a potential buyer. Bidding is pretty active, so it seems like buyers aren’t being scared off.

At $2,949 and a couple days left on the auction, this looks like a good deal for such a shiny, original machine with only 11,000 miles on the clock. This is another one of those bikes that I’d love to pick up, if I only had the space to keep one. A great introductory classic, or a bike for someone who wants to spend more time riding than wrenching!

-tad

1976 Honda CB400 L Front

Executive Express: 1982 Honda CBX for Sale

1982 Honda CBX R Front

I’ve written a number of times about Honda’s mighty CBX, with its straight-six and cascading wall of exhaust pipes. They’re glorious monuments to excess: relatively heavy, with too many cylinders, too many exhaust pipes, and too many carburetors, with plenty of power and a truly silken, exotic exhaust note.

1982 Honda CBX L Engine

Introduced in 1979, the bikes struggled a bit with their identity. The straight-six itself was shared with no other models and was really intended to evoke Honda’s GP race bikes of ten years prior. But while those racing machines were jewel-like exotics of staggering complexity and miraculous packaging, the CBX let it all hang out, and with the butch 1047cc powerplant on full display, the bike was anything but lithe and sleek. Although the six wasn’t really much wider than Honda’s 750 four-cylinder, it certainly looked that way, and the whole package was pretty heavy. Nearly 600 pounds of weight, combined with relatively indifferent suspension, made the bike more of a sport-touring machine.

1982 Honda CBX L Rear

Early CBX’s featured classic “UJM on steroids” styling, with twin shocks, a little duck-tailed seat unit, and nothing up front to hide the imposing engine. But in 1981 the bike’s mission changed and the bike was developed into a monoshock sport-touring machine. The angular 80’s fairings may not be to everyone’s taste, but the redesign actually suits the bike’s original mission very well: eating up miles in class and comfort.

1982 Honda CBX Dash

From the original eBay listing: 1982 Honda CBX for Sale

I am the second owner for the past 24 years. The bike has lived a sheltered life, always indoors where it was has been loved and respected. Never wrecked or abused. Keeping this rare-limited bike to original specs and condition was always my goal and passion. Original 13, 340 miles. Untouched pearl white paint with black/blue stripes. Minimal paint scuffs on right rear saddle bag from passengers getting on and off through the years. One small minor 3/8″ scratch on left front side of gas tank. Original owner called it a “birthmark” since new from shipping. It was elected to leave it rather then to fix it.

All original decals an information tags still on the bike and in perfect condition. Current a leather Corbin seat for comfort, original seat is in perfect condition and included in the sale. Bike runs and rides excellent, no issues. No rust in gas tank. Everything works as it should. Highway pegs added when new by original owner – not drilled. Tires were replaced 22 years ago, no rot. Front tire in very good condition, rear is wearing down. Approximately 11,000 miles on tires. I have a brand new set of tires never used, original to the 1982 CBX are also included with the sale.

Front fork seals replaced, carbs were synchronized once. Replaced full exhaust with last known set of Honda line original exhaust 20 years ago for $2,000 is still in like new condition and replaced rear air shock due to leaking for $680 with last known Honda line original.

1982 Honda CBX Front

Folks who love to travel on their motorcycles seem to love full-dress Harleys. I’ve never ridden a full-dress Harley, so I can’t really speak to the experience, but I do know that they’re extremely heavy, relatively slow, and handle poorly. I hear they have killer stereos though… That seems to suit most people, but I’ve never understood why you can’t have comfort, speed, and sophistication. This CBX provides all three, and I think I’d prefer that wailing straight-six for a soundtrack, since I’m pretty bored with classic rock.

With bidding just above $5,000 it’s no surprise the reserve has not been met. This bike looks to be a very nice example of a late CBX. One of the few Japanese bikes of the period that have really always been pretty collectible, CBX values are definitely on the rise, although early bikes remain more desirable. Which is great if you actually want to use your bike to tour, since you get that truly epic motor in a much more usable package.

-tad

1982 Honda CBX R Side

Just Add Boost: 1982 Honda CX500 Turbo

1982 Honda CX500 Turbo L Side Outdoors

The CX500 motorcycles from Honda are pretty strange machines, considering the source: for a company whose calling card had become sophisticated range of four-cylinder motorcycles, it seems strange they would introduce a longitudinally-oriented, shaft drive, pushrod motorcycle.

1982 Honda CX500 Turbo R Nose

In fact, every aspect actually seems like an attempt to one-up Moto Guzzi: the longitudinal v-twin, but with 80º between the cylinders to keep the engine more compact. A slight twist to the heads themselves that required pushrods instead of overhead cams, but allowed the carbs and inlets to keep clear of the riders legs. A transmission spinning counter to crankshaft rotation, to help cancel some to the inherent torque reaction caused by the engine’s north-south orientation. The bike was water-cooled and featured the first tubeless tires on a production motorcycle, mounted to Honda’s Comstar wheels.

Unfortunately, while all this made sense, it was pug-ugly and pretty appliance-like.

1982 Honda CX500 Turbo L Front Wheel

But when other Japanese manufacturers began turbocharging their bikes, Honda turbocharged their first-ever v-twin because it was liquid-cooled and could handle the additional heat and stress generated by forced-induction. The pushrod twin may not have looked very sophisticated on paper, but it provided a great foundation for the innovations Honda applied, including advanced, computer-controlled fuel injection, a mono-shock rear end, and anti-dive fork, and 19psi of boost.

The result was 82hp from 497cc’s and a tested top speed of over 120mph.

1982 Honda CX500 Turbo R Fairing

From the original eBay listing: 1982 Honda CX500 Turbo for Sale

Rare 1982 honda cx 500 turbo bike , bike runs and rides good, Stator was replaced a few years ago, new battery, new brake pads, original Honda tool kit, side covers have no broken tabs, do not let the miles fool you this bike runs great, this bike has some small scuffs on the right side fairing near the front, that was there when I bought this bike, clear MN title in my name and plated , this will need a rear  tire soon, other wise bike starts rides good and has good power

1982 Honda CX500 Turbo L Dash

The CX500 Turbo was a real one-year wonder and was superceded by the CX650 that actually displaced 673cc’s… Turbo bikes in general were expensive to produce and provided horsepower gains more easily achieved by simple displacement increases. But while not necessarily the best way to go fast, they do provide exciting power delivery and turbocharged motors are a great deal of fun when the boost kicks in.

Bidding is still under $3,000 with just a day left. It’s not perfect and does have some wear on the left-side fairing, but this is a real steal for such an interesting and rare motorcycle.

-tad

1982 Honda CX500 Turbo R Rear

Trapped in Amber: 1964 Honda CB160 Roadracer CR93 Replica

1964 Honda CB175 Roadracer R Side

This week’s race-replica theme continues with a very pretty little Honda CB Roadracer.

The CR93 “Benly” that inspired this machine is from an era when Honda wasn’t a household name associated with clockwork precision motorcycles of unprecedented complexity and unheard of reliability. These were very rare production 125 racers were produced in small numbers for only two years, putting out 21hp from the gear-driven, four-valve per cylinder parallel twin.

It was simple, but sophisticated, with reliable engineering and adequate power, and it was very competitive on race tracks until the 1970’s.

This very slick replica is based on the CB160 and is probably pretty close to the real thing in terms of performance: it’s lower in specification, with only two valves per cylinder and single overhead cam, but the larger displacement means very similar outright power, and more torque.

From the original listing: 1964 Honda CB Roadracer for Sale

This CB160 Based HondaCR93 Replica is in Great condition, Difficult to distinguish from the Original Factory machines of which only 140 approx. where Produced. Located in my rec. room for the past years. Only top Quality items where purchased to complete this 175cc CR93 Replica. it has never been raced or Track day’d.

Rebuilt Crank
Megacycle Race Cam # 122X4
5 speed transmission installed, 1 down 4 up.
New Pistons, Rods,Bearings & Seals Installed.
New Carbs, Keihin PE24mm Race Cams
Custom Handmade Alum CR93 Tank & Seat  Painted in Original Honda CR Colors.
Electronic Ignition, Dayna Coils
Alum Valanced (Dropped ) Rims with Avon Race Tires.
Stainless Steel Spokes
Torozzi Alum Rearsets
Honda CR93 type Steering Dampner
Ikon (Koni ) rear Shocks
Some spare items, Pistons, Gaskets, Cables etc.

1964 Honda CB175 Roadracer L Side Naked

I’d prefer a few more photos of this bike, since it looks to be a high-quality replica. And he mentions both the CB160 and CB175 in his description although, given the year, I’d assume it’s based around the 160. He lists frame and engine numbers, so some quick research should clear things up if you’re considering throwing your hat into the ring on this one.

I’m not sure what the point of this build was originally: it’s an authentic-looking replica that appears to have been intended for display only, but that uses many high-performance parts and appears to be set up for serious track work. Which is a shame, since people actively race CB160 and CB175 Hondas, and I’ve been thinking about getting into this myself: it’s still cheap and unintimidating, with parts and tuning advice widely available.

The seller even mentions AHRMA, WERA, VRRA, and Group W in the listing, suggesting it’s eligible for those race-sanctioning bodies.

The reserve hasn’t been met yet at $3,200 which is no real surprise, considering how much work it looks like went into this build. I hope someone picks this up and gets it out on the road.

-tad

 

1964 Honda CB175 Roadracer R Side Naked

Faux Racer: 1973 Honda CB350F RC166 Replica for Sale

1966 Honda CB350 RC166 Replica L Side Front

Well this presents an odd opportunity: the chance to talk about two very different bikes in the same article. This 1973 Honda CB350F has been fully rebuilt to resemble the RC166 Grand Prix bike of the mid-1960’s. I used to see a guy at the Trader Joe’s in Los Angeles all the time who rode a bike like this one, all clad in black leathers and a replica “puddin’ bowl” helmet, the vintage-racer equivalent of the ubiquitous Harley “skid lid:” just as stupid, but way cooler.

1966 Honda CB350 RC166 Replica L Side Rear

This bike is intended as a replica of Honda’s RC166, an engineering masterpiece, and I’m not sure it succeeds on that front, although it does manage to be a very nice vintage motorcycle with a strong racing style.

1966 Honda CB350 RC166 Replica R Side

Introduced in 1972 as one of the seemingly endless, smaller iterations of the CB750 four-cylinder, the CB350F was, at the time, a very unusual bike in that most machines this small were twins or singles. The engine was actually undersquare, with a bigger bore than stroke and put 34hp thorough a 5-speed gearbox. Although there were plenty of other bikes in the class that were lighter and less expensive, including Honda’s own CB350 twin, the jewel-like engineering appealed to a different type of buyer, and the bike’s increased complexity was offset by Honda’s impressively reliable engineering.

1966 Honda CB350 RC166 Replica Engine Detail

From the original eBay listing: 1973 Honda CB350F RC166 Replica for Sale

This ’73 CB350F is fresh out of a full engine-out cosmetic and mechanical restoration from the frame up. The best I can describe is that everything is new except Frame, Engine, Wheel Hubs and the Triple Trees. Here is an example of what’s new on the bike.  Avon tires, aluminum rims, stainless spokes, caliper and pads, shock seals and fluid, steel fender, headlights, brake and tail light, license plate bracket, 4 into 1 headers, cone engineering muffler, tachometer cable, clutch cable, throttle cables, clutch lever, throttle assembly, grips, anti vibration bar ends, tapered roller bearing steering neck kit, clip-ons, master cylinder, Airtech-Fairing, seat, seat pan, fuel tank, windshield, chain, rear shocks, rear brake pads, electronic ignition, Antigravity 4cell battery, Antigravity battery charger, regulator/rectifier, velocity stacks, bronze swing arm bushings, point to point wiring. Clean title 14,538 miles. Less than 100 miles since restoration. Has electric start, headlights, tail light and brake light utilizing front brake. No speedo but in 5th gear 3,000 rpm’s = 30mph. 5,000 rpm’s = 50mph and so on. No turn signals and mirrors. The carburetors were professionally restored and I will provide extra main jets sizes. Engine does not leak oil, had new gasket kit installed along with all new fluids. The numbers on the fairing are vinyl and easily removable if you choose.

1966 Honda CB350 RC166 Replica R Side Tank

Compared to the real thing, the tank is suitably long and lean but the whole thing isn’t quite proportioned correctly and doesn’t have the tiny, rounded bum-stop tailpiece of the original. It also, of course, lacks Honda’s absolute shrieking masterpiece of a motor, a straight 6-cylinder, four-valve 250cc machine that belted out 65hp through a 7-speed gearbox. With internals that looked more like the parts of a scale model than the real thing, it’s almost impossible to imagine the skill involved in the creation of this thing in an era before computers and modern manufacturing techniques.

1966 Honda CB350 RC166 Replica Dash

And it worked: in the 1966 250cc world championship, the RC166 won ten of ten races.

1966 Honda CB350 RC166 Replica Rear Wheel

Although at first glance this replica isn’t streetable, there’s space for a number plate, a tail light, and the bike does feature a pair of little projector-beam headlamps tucked up between the forks under the nose of the fairing.

1966 Honda CB350 RC166 Replica R Rear

The starting bid is $7,400 with no takers yet but plenty of time left on the auction. This is really big money for a CB350, but pretty small money for such a one-of-a-kind custom with a ton of style. This is a very sweet little bike that is more “inspired by” the RC166 than it is an actual “replica of,” but that’s okay: a more authentic replica would probably be much more expensive, and still wouldn’t feature that awe-inspiring engine.

-tad

1966 Honda CB350 RC166 Replica L Side