Category: Triumph

As Seen On TV: Fonzie’s 1949 Triumph Trophy 500 for Sale

1949 Triumph Trophy 500

Normally we use the term “sportbike” on this site to refer to street and track bikes with a roadracing style or intent. But obviously offroading is a sport, so I’m going to stretch our usual definition to include today’s iconic motorcycle: the Triumph Trophy 500 as seen on the TV show “Happy Days.”

1949 Triumph Trophy 500 L Side

Today, rebels without causes and 1%-ers wouldn’t be caught dead with anything but one of Milwaukee’s finest slung between their legs. But Henry Winkler’s Arthur Fonzarelli was a different kind of rebel, a good kid with a rebellious streak, a kinder, gentler tough guy and his greaser image harkens back to an earlier era, when bad boys rode whatever they wanted. In fact, the original motorcycle hooligan, Marlon Brando’s character in The Wild One, rode a Triumph Thunderbird. His whole crew actually rode British iron, although rival gang members rode Harleys.

1949 Triumph Trophy 500 R Side Engine

Named for Triumph’s success at the Italian International Six Day Trial in 1948, the original Trophy was an offroad special derived from the Speed Twin. A rigid frame housed a 498cc parallel-twin backed by a four-speed gearbox, with a 1951 redesign adding an aluminum head and barrels.

This particular example isn’t in particularly nice shape and, if not for the association with the show, you might simply dismiss it as a “barn find” in need of a restoration.

1949 Triumph Trophy 500 L Side Engine

From the original eBay listing: Happy Days 1949 Triumph Trophy 500 for Sale

“The Fonz” Henry Winkler’s  Iconic  Fully Documented Happy Days Televison Series  used 1949 Triumph Trophy 500 Motorcycle.

Found by Cycle World Magazine and later sold and fully documented by Bonhams’ Auctions.

Sold in its unrestored “as filmed condition” with all its studio scars and its almost 70 years of age. (Fully documented and vetted by Bonham’s Auctions)

Built by non other than Bud Ekins, the premier builder for the studios and sold by him to the prior owner.

The Television show ran for 10 years from 1974 to 1984 making it one of the most beloved television series in history.

So iconic that his motorcycle jacket is on permanent display at the Smithsonian Museum and a toy model was made and sold throughout the world.

This could be one of the most iconic motorcycles ever!

AYYYE!  Thumbs up! 

1949 Triumph Trophy 500 Tank

Certainly the seller is probably correct that this is one of the most iconic motorcycles ever. Maybe not among motorcycle fans in particular, but certainly among people in general. With a $100,000 Buy It Now price, you’re certainly not paying for the machine itself. Instead, this is a bit of entertainment history. So what to do with it? I’d keep it as-is in terms of patina, but I’d give it a good mechanical restoration so I could put on my Schott Perfecto 618 and ride it to motorcycle shows, hair slicked back in a pompadour, like the rest of the romeos wore…

-tad

1949 Triumph Trophy 500 Fonz

Tea with Hot Sauce: 1967 Triumph Bonneville with Tracy Bodywork

1967 Trimph Bonneville Tracy R Front

While this Triumph Bonneville with Tracy bodywork is really more dirt-track than actual sportbike, but it’s cool and rare enough I thought it was worth a post.

1967 Trimph Bonneville Tracy L Engine

During the wild-and-woolly 1960s and 1970s, body kits could be found for all kinds of cars and bikes and change your workaday VW Bug or UJM into something much more individual. Some were complete garbage, and some were of very high quality. Tracy Nelson’s Fiberglas Works’ were of the latter variety. Based out of Santa Cruz and inspired by Craig Vetter’s creations, Tracy designed one-piece bodywork that replaced heavy steel tanks, side panels, and seat with one-piece replacements that both lightened the bike and lowered its center of gravity.

1967 Trimph Bonneville Tracy Dash

When Tracy kits turn up, they tend to be decked out with wild period paintjobs or metal-flake custom insanity and are sometimes grafted on to home-brew choppers of dubious quality. This example keeps things simple and is a very appropriate baby blue that really shows off the bodywork to good effect.

1967 Trimph Bonneville Tracy Rear Suspension

From the original eBay listing: 1967 Triumph Bonneville with Tracy Bodywork for Sale

Built by: B & D Cycles Triumph Restorations of Clinton, WI.

Cosmetically in beautiful shape as well. 

Tracy body is solid and finished in high quality “Team Triumph” blue/white. Tank was properly lined to resist ethanol fuel damage to fiberglass.

Not many of these Tracy bodies survived the ’70s in this nice of condition… or at all.

Stored in a climate controlled environment and ridden on a fairly regular basis.

Numbers matching T120 frame and motor. TR6 head (had to be used to fit the Tracy body kit). 

Engine was completely rebuilt a couple of years ago. 

Bike has Clubman bars, Bates headlight and Mighty Mite electronics with capacitor.

Reverse magaphone mufflers, ’68 front wheel and brake assembly laced to a Borrani Shoulder rim.

Tires and tubes are excellent. 

Bike is ready to ride and enjoy right now. No worries.

VERY STRONG RUNNER!! PLENTY OF POWER!!

A VERY cool, clean and unusual bike for not a lot of money. 

You will NOT park next to someone on another Triumph like this… period. 

1967 Trimph Bonneville Tracy L Tank

The seller also helpfully includes a walk around tour and a cold startup video. With just a couple days left on the auction and a starting bid of $4,650, I’m surprised there’s been little interest so far. It looks this might go for far less than a similarly stock Bonneville and offers up a bit of American hot sauce to spice up your Brit-bike Earl Grey.

-tad

1967 Trimph Bonneville Tracy L Rear

Working Class Hero: 1958 Triton for Sale

1958 Triton L Side

One of my favorite things about motorcycles is the seeming endless ways there are to mix and match parts to create new machines. Chain drive and fairly simple frames mean that it’s no big deal to say, sling an RD400 motor into the old GS500E you have lying around. But while many of these creations are born of necessity or just to see if it can be done, the classic Triton was a very functional motorcycle that actually managed to achieve some legitimacy among the motorcycling community.

1958 Triton R Side Engine

The Triton was a hybrid that used a Triumph parallel-twin engine and the famously excellent-handling Norton “featherbed” frame to create a seriously nimble motorcycle with good power and endless tuning potential. It also happens to be the name of the half-man, half-fish son of Poseidon in Greek mythology, something that the motorcycling community has sadly not capitalized on.

1958 Triton Dash

The choice of a Triumph engine might seem odd at first. After all, in stock form, it was actually a bit more powerful than the Triumph. But the Norton’s longer-stroke engine had a much higher piston speed and was considered less reliable, and a wealth of performance parts and tuning expertise were available for the Triumph as well.

1958 Triton L Side Engine

Interestingly, the non-unit design of both bikes meant that either four-speed gearbox could be used, although the Norton’s was generally considered superior. Really, all it took to make a Triton was a couple of donor bikes and a set of engine/transmission mounting plates, so it wasn’t too difficult to build one if you were reasonably competent with a set of tools, and plenty of these were built then and are being built today, so “authenticity” is hard to define and hard to verify.

From the original eBay listing: 1958 Triton for Sale

Ultimate Cafe Racer

1958 Norton Featherbed frame (Model 88)

1971 Triumph T120R engine with 4 speed transmission.

  • Unity Special Equipe UNAX2 Polished aluminum, Lyta style, 3 Gallon Short Circuit fuel tank.
  • Unity Wideline oiltank w/ battery holder
  • Unity Wideline Seat
  • Unity Fiberglass Fenders
  • Gold Star Silencers
  • Converta Engine plates
  • 4 Leading shoe Brake hubs
  • Akront Rims laced by Hagon
  • Far too many parts to list them all. For more information please feel free to contact us with your inquiries. 
  • Clocks show 269 Miles. Actual mileage is unknown. 
  • Was acquired from a museum. Rides and sounds wonderful. 

1958 Triton R Side Rear

I don’t know all that much about Tritons, but I know enough to know that they naturally vary a bit from bike to bike, since there’s no such thing as a “factory” example. These really do take the best bits and incorporate them into one of the most beautiful bikes of the era: everything is on display here, and looks purposefully industrial, but hand-crafted and decorative at the same time… So far, bidding is very slow, with the Reserve Not Met at $5,000 which is obviously well below where I expect this to sell, but maybe someone will manage to scoop a bargain with this one…

-tad

1958 Triton L Side Riding

More Patina Than You Can Handle: 1973 Triumph Hurricane X75

1973 Triumph X75 R SideI’ve gotten into the habit of occasionally posting these Triumph X75 Hurricanes, although they’re actually proto-choppers more than they are actual sportbikes. But I think they’re pretty cool, and since they’re powered by the Triumph/BSA three-cylinder engine, I think most of our readers probably like them too. 1973 Triumph X75 R Side Tank DetailStyled by icon Craig Vetter, the X75 Hurricane was intended for the US market, and the bosses at BSA felt that the original look planned for the bike was far too vanilla for the riders on this side of the pond. He might have gone a bit overboard with the Hurricane, but the result sure is distinctive and features Vetter’s signature one-piece tank-and-bodywork, along with that fan of tailpipes along the right side of the bodywork.

Just 1200 were made, using engines set aside when BSA went under and the bike was rebranded as a Triumph. 1973 Triumph X75 R Side EngineThe 741cc overhead-valve three-cylinder engine was fairly traditional in terms of design and construction, but put out a healthy 58hp and could push the bike well over 100mph and would have been perfect for blasting away from stoplights in a storm of noise. It should also turn left pretty well, but fast right turns could prove to be a bit of a problem… 1973 Triumph X75 R Side Exhaust DetailFrom the original eBay listing: 1973 Triumph X75 Hurricane for Sale

We are thrilled to offer such a unique and rare piece of motorcycle history. If you’ve got a Triumph-sized hole in your collection and want something pretty wild and very cool, this might fit the bill. To the best of our knowledge this amazing Triumph Hurricane X75 is all original and untouched. Please review pictures for overall condition and please feel free to ask any questions.

Well I have a question: “Does it run?” While it’s nice to have a bit of the model’s history, I think most buyers would appreciate a bit more information about this specific example, especially considering the $32,000 Buy It Now price. I’m pretty sure anyone even remotely interested in dropping that kind of money on a bike probably already knows a bit about the bike’s general background. 1973 Triumph X75 R FrontThis particular example is positively dripping with patina. For many folks, originality is absolutely key, and this one’s got more originality than you might be able to deal with. To be honest, it looks like it’s in need of a complete, ground-up restoration. Mechanically, at least: many collectors want to keep that original paint intact as much as possible. Me? I’m all for resto-mods and restorations: many vintage vehicles were never intended to be collectors items or last though the ages, and were built to a price, with ugly wiring, parts-bin switches, and low-quality paint on frame and bodywork.

Is this Hurricane really worth $32,000? We’ll just have to wait ’till the end of this auction and see if someone ponies up the cash for this iconic motorcycle.

-tad 1973 Triumph X75 R Side Front

Tasty Triple: 1974 Triumph Trident for Sale

1974 Triumph Trident R Side

It’s pretty easy to imagine what sort of engine powers a Triumph Trident: a trident obviously offers three prongs of fish or secutor and murmillo-stabbing goodness, and the Trident has three cylinders of British charisma! Built with the US market in mind and designed to counter the immanent threat of Honda’s CB750, the Triumph/BSA 750 triple was much smoother than the parallel-twins on which it was based. It featured very ordinary specifications, with a four-speed box that was updated to a five-speed unit in 1971 and pushrod-actuated overhead valves.

1974 Triumph Trident L Side Front

This was good for 58hp and a nearly 120mph top speed. While the specifications were ordinary, the Triumph/BSA machine was the only game in town at the time if you wanted a big, four-stroke triple. And why wouldn’t you? Triples famously combine the torque of a twin and the revs of a four, with a funky, syncopated beat.

1974 Triumph Trident Clocks

Interestingly, BSA owned Triumph at the time and the triple was produced in both BSA and Triumph versions: unit construction allowed slight visual differences between the two, with the BSA engine leaned slightly forward and the Triumph’s more upright. The same engine would later find its way into the very striking X75 Hurricane as well, although the Trident is far more restrained in terms of style.

1974 Triumph Trident R Side Engine

From the original eBay listing: 1974 Triumph Trident for Sale

Kept in a climate controlled environment and out of a serious collection. Currently registered and road-ready. Converted to a cafe-style bike. Very rare aluminium tank, 1969 ray gun mufflers, cafe style seat and custom paint. This is not a barn fresh bike, starts stops and runs. Please take a look at the pictures and feel free to ask any questions you may have. This IS a matching numbers bike!

1974 Triumph Trident L Side Engine

The aluminum tank on this bike has a much more squared-off style that looks a bit more like the BSA’s original design: the Triumph’s tank was a much more traditional, teardrop Bonneville-style piece.

Personally, I’d swap that solo-seat/number-plate tail section out for a nice dual seat and some passenger pegs: this is clearly no race-bike, and would make an excellent platform for introducing that special someone to the pleasures of life on a bike.

-tad

1974 Triumph Trident L Side

 

It’s Only Original Once: 1973 Triumph Hurricane X75 for Sale

1973 Triumph X75 Hurricane L Side Rear

The Hurricane X75 looks like a funky, custom chopper-styled bike, but those looks came straight from the factory, by way of styling guru Craig Vetter, who was called in to redesign the bike when the original machine was deemed way too conservative for the target audience in the USA.

1973 Triumph X75 Hurricane Dash

The distinctive integrated one-piece tank cover and side-panels came in a vivid, “look at me” orange and then there’s that wild three-into-three exhaust: on the left side of the bike, there’s nothing but a bare swingarm. Then you walk around to the right side of the bike and bam, there it is, like a giant sonic pitchfork.

1973 Triumph X75 Hurricane L Side Engine

That burly triple was actually built by BSA: when they went out of business, 1,200 of the engines were put aside for use in the new Triumph although, at Craig’s suggestion, the cylinder head did feature extended cooling fins for a beefier look. Displacing 741cc, the OHV triple put out 58hp and could push the bike over 110mph.

1973 Triumph X75 Hurricane Fork

From the original eBay listing: 1973 Triumph Hurricane X75 for Sale

We are thrilled to offer such a unique and rare piece of motorcycle history. If you’ve got a Triumph-sized hole in your collection and want something pretty wild and very cool, this might fit the bill. To the best of our knowledge this amazing Triumph Hurricane X75 is all original and untouched. Please review pictures for overall condition and feel free to ask any questions.

1973 Triumph X75 Hurricane Rear Suspension

Like most cruisers, the X75 isn’t really the most practical machine, with minimal cornering clearance, at least in right-hand turns, and very limited range from the sub-3 gallon fuel tank. But that was hardly the point: the Hurricane was a glorious posing machine, with ample stoplight performance and killer looks. In fact, one Triumph executive is reported to have said, upon seeing the bike for the first time, “My God, it’s a bloody phallus!”

So basically: mission accomplished.

1973 Triumph X75 Hurricane L Side Carbs

This isn’t the shiny, well-maintained or restored bike we like to feature, but it does look to be all original. This Hurricane is obviously going to need a full restoration to make it roadworthy, but that gives the new owner the opportunity to do it right.

-tad

1973 Triumph X75 Hurricane L Side

Vintage Race Replica: 1969 Triumph Daytona T100 Percy Tait Replica for Sale

1969 Triumph T100 Daytona Race Bike R Side

Sorry for the lack of posts everyone: I’m travelling right now, and it’s been making regular updates difficult. Bear with me and we should be back on track soon!

Today’s bike is a pretty cool vintage racing Triumph Daytona that appears to be extremely well-prepared and is specifically built with endurance and long-distance racing in mind. If you’re not familiar with Percy Tait, you likely won’t be surprised to find that he raced Triumphs, and was also a Triumph development rider and racked up huge miles on various prototypes. Wikipedia tells me he is alive and well and is currently a champion… breeder of rare sheep.

Does it get any more English than that?

1969 Triumph T100 Daytona Race Bike L Side Rear

There is plenty of additional information at the original eBay listing: 1969 Triumph Percy Tait Replica

T100 Daytona as used 1969 Belgian Grand Prix in Spa where it took second place behind an MV Agusta ridden by Giacomo Agostini.

With the rare Ken Sprayson Frame only made for the 1969 GP Triumph machine. 
Ridden on the Manx Grand Prix 2003 and 2004 by York Runte.
Tuning by Winkelmann and OIF-Racing teamready too race, tested 2014 in Pannoniaring Hungary, was ridden two times the Isle of Man Manx grand prix with good results 2003 and 2004. All working, tested, and proved: no “need some work” or funny constructions that fall apart in the first lap…

65.5mm stroke as T100, belt conversion, stainless exhaust tested and optimized with test bench
specially made 5 speed gearbox
47.5 horsepower on the rear wheel at 7500 revs, good torque, smooth running no hole at some revs…. 
Vibrations absolutely okay, much better than all other racers I was riding before

Yes, you could tune for some more power at higher revs and with losing some torque in the midrange, the former owners decided this is a good compromise of smooth running, less repair than with the last 5 extra horsepower you could get out of this engine.  There is an extra pair of new forged pistons and cylinder with the bike that could be changed to bit more compression or just used as spare part and copy the momental piston shape.
This engine version is for long distance races like the Isle of Man.

1969 Triumph T100 Daytona Race Bike R Side Front

It’s pretty cool that the original bike’s claim to fame was actually losing to the peerless Agostini! There’s no shame in that! The bike is currently located in Munich, Germany and is listed with a $16,500 Buy It Now price, which would normally be a bit steep for a Triumph, but actually seems pretty fair for such a well-prepared vintage race bike.

-tad

1969 Triumph T100 Daytona Race Bike

Vintage Rider: 1964 Triton for Sale

1964 Triton L Side Rear

It’s interesting that a bastardized hybrid like the Triton could become such an iconic classic motorcycle. It’s an anecdotal observation, but it seems that engine swaps are more acceptable among the motorcycling fraternity than they are in the automotive world. Certainly, there are subcultures of swappers and hot-rodders putting all sorts of engine into cars, regardless of make or model. But they’re looked at a bit askance by more “cultured” enthusiasts… Not so much in the motorcycling world, it seems like. Maybe it’s that motorcycles are easier to work on, more modular. Or maybe it’s that the engines and parts are generally less durable, meaning owners are more likely to have replaced some or all of the original components through attrition…

1964 Triton R Side

The Triton used Triumph’s famous parallel-twin engine and Norton’s justifiably famous “featherbed” frame, combining what was considered to be each bike’s strongest feature and turning them into a high-performance motorcycle: virtually the only custom parts needed to build one were custom engine and transmission mounting plates. Although some established shops built, and continue to build these, many were built in sheds by your average Joe Enthusiast.

1964 Triton L Side Front

Power wasn’t an issue for Norton’s parallel-twin engine, in fact it actually had a bit of an advantage over the Triumph in stock form. But the long-stroke Norton engine was pushing what was considered at the time to be the limits of acceptable piston speed, and the more “square” Triumph engine was more durable by far, and could be easily tuned. The pre-unit construction of both bikes even made it easy to keep the Norton four-speed box that was considered the better choice of the two, although some used the Triumph transmission.

1964 Triton R Side Engine

From the original eBay listing: 1964 Triton for Sale

Good running motorcycle. Its been very reliable and has never given me issues or failed to get me to my destinations. It’s not perfect cosmetically, it’s not a show bike so if that’s what you want then this bike is not for you. Fiberglass tank is solid but paint has some scratches. Fiberglass oil tank is nice, and fiberglass seat is solid but leather cover has some scuffs here and there. The frame is a 1964 Norton Atlas, and powder coated, both front and back fenders are too for that Manx look. Both 19″ Rims and spokes are brand new, laced to a front TLS and rear brake. Avon tires are new too. Forks are rebuilt, new bushings and seals. Swing arm has copper bushings. The ’65 T100R Daytona unit engine has about 3000 miles since rebuilt, converted to single carb. The right side header has a weld due to hairline crack few years ago, it’s been solid since. I consider this bike my daily rider, it’s been garaged these last couple of years. Reason for selling..??.. Now a dad!

This Triton runs very well. The TLS brake does have the backing plate bracket that helps stop this bike well! 

1964 Triton Front Brake

If this were mine, I’d want to source a couple of appropriate Smiths gauges, and I understand that the “twin carburetor” configuration is the hot set-up, but I expect the single carb improves rideability. I’m also not clear on when the bike was originally built: was the recent work a refresh of a vintage Triton build, or was it a more recent conversion? Either way, the seller freely admits this is no show bike, and personally that’s how I like them. These will always need more attention than a modern machine, but it speaks volumes that the seller considers this a “daily rider.”

-tad

1964 Triton R Side Front

Steve McQueen Tribute: 1964 Triumph TR6C Trophy for Sale

1964 Triumph Trophy R Side

I don’t often write up Triumphs like this TR6C Trophy because, although they’re the very embodiment of vintage motorcycles, they’re also pretty easy to find: Triumph made a boatload of them, and fans have been collecting and restoring them for years. So when I go looking for cool bikes, there’s almost always something weirder or rarer to write about.

But this particular bike caught my eye, painted up in vivid Gulf Racing colors as a nod to famous Triumph owner and racer Steve McQueen. And who doesn’t love that striking color combo?

1964 Triumph Trophy L Side Rear

Built between 1956 and 1973, the TR6 was designed for the North American market and their hunger for larger displacement motorcycles. It was powered by a 649cc version of Triumph’s long-lived parallel twin with iron barrels and, for the first time, a lightweight aluminum cylinder head. Earlier bikes used pre-unit construction, with the engine and four-speed transmission as separate castings, but 1964 saw Triumph’s use of unit construction that stiffened the package and simplified manufacturing.

1964 Triumph Trophy R Side Tank Detail

The “C” model designation in “TR6C” stood for “competition” and referred to the desert racing at which it excelled. In fact, that tiny headlamp was designed to be easily removed at the track, and then replaced for the ride home. Of course, most people who bought these didn’t race them, but that’s always the case with race-inspired style.

1964 Triumph Trophy L Side Tank

From the original eBay listing: 1964 Triumph TR6C Trophy for Sale

Amazing condition throughout. Professionally restored. Nothing on the market this nice!

New custom “Gulf” paint job, complete professional rebuild with powder coated black rims and many extras. (The blue & orange in the pics look darker than what they actually are).  Google Gulf Racing to see actual colors

 These are the team Gulf colors that Steve McQueen used during his sponsored races in 1964 and other years.

All work was done at a reputable Triumph shop with no expense spared.  Chrome swing arms, black powder coated rims, Mikuni carburetors, new chrome parts, new tires, new clutch plates & cables, etc. etc.

This bike performs and runs strong!  

638 Miles on the speedometer, but this was from when it was restored.

This is a masterpiece! Over $12,000 and a lot of time invested.

1964 Triumph Trophy R Side Rear

Although Triumphs usually require more wrenching than your average Japanese or German or even Italian machine, they’re easy to get parts for, simple to work on, and there’s a ton of information available to help keep them running. In addition, Triumphs are the types of machines that are instantly recognizable by bikers and non-bikers alike and inspire smiles wherever you go.

With a $7,200 Buy It Now price, this one isn’t the cheapest you’ll find and is obviously not all-original, but looks to be well done and very striking in blue and orange. I’m curious to see how Triumph fans react to this bike: is the non-original paint combo going to impact offers on this bike? Is it a bit too loud for your average Triumph fan?

-tad

1964 Triumph Trophy L Side

Baby Blue: 1975 Rickman-Metisse Triumph 650 CR

1975 Rickman Metisse 650CR L Side Front

Although I’m not a huge fan of the hazy edges of the photos, this blue Rickman Metisse Triumph 650CR looks gorgeous. Rickman started out making frames for offroad race bikes and later expanded into roadracing, and their distinctive nickel-plated tubular frames improved handling of the often floppy factory bikes of the era. These frames were designed to save weight and significantly improve stiffness, with the hollow frame tubes functioning to both store and cool engine oil on some models. Rickman’s bikes were generally sold in kit-form, with the customer supplying engines, transmissions, and wiring to complete the bike.

1975 Rickman Metisse 650CR R Cockpit

The company had a sense of humor as well: the name “Metisse” translates to “mongrel.” But, like most mongrels, the resulting creature is often healthier than the purebred animals that donated their DNA, and the Rickman Metisse attempted to combine the engineering of established manufacturers with the handling of a racebike, often with striking results.

1975 Rickman Metisse 650CR Dash

While later machines were often based around bikes from Japan, there was still room in their lineup for British machines, as this example shows. While a Triumph-powered sportbike may have been a bit moribund in 1975, this would still have turned serious heads. A Honda-powered Metisse probably would have been faster, but with a torquey parallel-twin and great looks, this combines the best of the era, wrapped up in bluer-than-blue bodywork.

1965 Rickman Metisse 650CR R Front

From the original eBay listing: 1975 Rickman Metisse Triumph 650CR

This is the last of 52 genuine Rickman-Metisse CR (Competition Replica) built by the Rickman factory in England. Rickman produced these as street-legal versions of their Isle of Man Production TT winning machine. Actual date of manufacture is September 1974. Registered as 1975 model. It is not a cobbled-together kit. Correct Rickman hubs, brakes, 41mm racing forks, all original hardware. Powered by a balanced and blueprinted Triumph T120R 650cc motor. Only 2700 original miles.

Original, unrestored, stunning. Nickel plating on frame showing some fading in some places, as expected over 40 years. Tiny ding on top of R/H silencer. A few minor chips in edges of fiberglass but not readily visible. Fuel tank showing some surface bumps/texturing in places, but was Caswell-coated inside by previous owner. I run VP110 ethanol-free gasoline in the bike. Starts first kick and runs/shifts perfectly. Handles incredibly well with new modern Avon tyres.

Please do not ask me my reserve. You find that out by bidding. You either hit it or you don’t. Clear California title in my name. Currently on non-op. No DMV back fees due. Blue California plate for display only and not associated with machine. I’ve described this beautiful bike to the best of my knowledge and ability. Sold as-is. Potential bidders welcome to make appointment to view in person, but no test rides. You will not be disappointed with its performance! The crown jewel to any British bike collection.

1975 Rickman Metisse 650CR R Engine Detail

The bidding is currently at $12,600 with active interest and a couple days left on the auction. This is a great-looking, well cared for machine. About the only gripe I have is with the obviously not-period-correct grips, although they are at least color-matched… A set of Tomaselli grips would be an inexpensive way to fix that and stay with a period look and brand.

-tad

1975 Rickman Metisse 650CR L Side