Tagged: 1969

A Rose by Any Other Name: 1969 Laverda 750GT for Sale

1975 Laverda 750GT R Side Front

Like Lamborghini, Laverda began building something other than fast, race-ready exotics. In fact, both manufactured agricultural machinery prior to branching out into supercars and superbikes, respectively. In Laverda’s case, that experience building durable, rugged farm equipment translated directly into motorcycles like this 1969 750GT, and the Laverda parallel-twins were famous for being over-engineered, with five main bearings in the engine, and for using electrical components sourced from Bosch and Nippon Denso. Reliability and build-quality were considered to be excellent when the bikes were new.

1975 Laverda 750GT L Engine2

Very early bikes had a 650cc displacement, but this grew to 744cc very quickly, owing to the expectation that the bigger engine would drive US sales. The bike weighed a little over 500lbs with fuel, and power was a very respectable 60hp for the 750cc version of the twin, with a top speed of over 100mph. The first Laverdas came to the US labeled as “American Eagles” instead of Laverdas, although many have been rebadged at this point. An American company that imported various bikes under a more patriotic brand, American Eagle had folded by 1970 and Laverdas were badged as Laverdas thereafter.

1975 Laverda 750GT Dash

It wasn’t that long ago that Laverda 750s were going for less than $5,000. They weren’t easy to find of course, but their collectability was in a bit of limbo and you could pick them up for a relative song. These days, even the earlier, “American Eagle” branded bikes are commanding nearly double that amount. The later 750SF or “Super Freni” has a distinctive, hairy-chested 70s vibe, with blocky styling and some vivid colors. But the earlier bikes like this one look much more like an Italian Commando, with that mini tank rack and the set of Smiths-looking gauges instead of the later, green-faced Honda-looking items… If you’re tastes run to the classic, the earlier Laverda twins offer power and reliability, with a dash of British class.

1975 Laverda 750GT Front Wheel

From the original eBay listing: 1969 Laverda 750GT for Sale

This is a very early Laverda 750cc GT. Frame and (matching) engine number: 1392. The ownership lists this bike as a 1969 model, but according to Tim Parker’s definitive Laverda reference (the ‘green book’) the serial number makes it a 1968 machine. One way or another, Laverda started the serial numbers for their twins at 1000, and they made a handful of 650s before upping the displacement to 750 – so this is one of the first 350 to 400 Laverda twins made.

I’ve owned this bike for almost 30 years. The speedo shows about 8,000 kilometers, but it was a new rebuilt instrument when I restored the bike about 8 years ago and doesn’t correspond especially well with the speedo drive gear, so that has very little to do with how far the bike has actually been ridden. It probably hasn’t seen an awful lot of use, however. It had been a basket job for about 10 years when I bought it back in the late 80s. I finally got around to starting a frame-up rebuild on it about 10 years ago.

The engine was completely stripped down and rebuilt – new pistons and cams, clutch plates, as well as any bearings, gaskets and seals that needed replacement. As you can see, it’s pretty pristine on the outside, and it’s just as clean inside, too. Since the rebuild it’s averaged about 1,000 kms (indicated) per summer, with oil changes every fall before going back into heated indoor storage for the winter.

It starts on the first turn of the crank, idles very steadily and pulls crisply to 6,500 rpm all 5 gears without any fuss or bother. Message me and I’ll send you a link to see a short video on YouTube showing this bike being started from cold as well as a bit of running footage.

10:1 ‘SFC’-type pistons were installed when I did the rebuild, as the original 7.7:1 compression ratio was a bit too laid back for modern roads, in my opinion. In combination with the 30mm square-slide carbs and medium-profile cams, this gives very torquey low-end and mid range response. Unlike some of the hairier (for their day) later Laverda twins, this set-up revs up from idle very smoothly and progressively — and makes for easily manageable around town riding. But it’s happiest loping down secondary roads at about 3,000 rpm – with the ‘cutback’ style Laverda pipes producing a nicely rorty, but not overly antisocial exhaust note. If you take a look at my YouTube video, you’ll get the idea.

This bike is very clean, but it’s not a museum piece. Over the years, I’ve gone over it from front to rear, inside and out, and I’ve sorted out a number of the Achilles’ heels that years of experience has taught me to look out for on Laverda twins in general and on this model in particular.

1975 Laverda 750GT L Engine

The seller’s description is much more detailed than shown above, but well worth a read: he obviously knows the bike inside and out, and is happy to share details of the restoration and the bike’s history, something that always inspires confidence. He even offers up post-sale “technical assistance” which has to be a first! Basically, if you’ve ever wanted an early Laverda twin, this might be worth a serious look. Bidding is very active on this bike, with very little time left on the auction. But the Reserve has not been met at $7,900 so it’s obvious that the seller is well aware of the bike’s increasing value. With under 8,000 miles on the clock, there’s plenty of life left in this Laverda: some parts can be scarce, but most of what you need to keep them running should be available, and the basic construction is extremely durable.

-tad

1975 Laverda 750GT R Side

Unrestored Beeza: 1969 BSA 650 Lightning for Sale

1969 BSA Lightning R Side

Designed as BSA’s versatile all-rounder, the A65 Lightning had twin-carbs compared to the Thunderbolt’s single-carb set up for improved performance at high rpm. It was considered the more conservative choice when compared to the competing Triumph Bonneville, although the flashy chrome tank panels look pretty striking today. Even though BSA and Triumph were technically owned by the same parent company by this point, clear attempts were made to create distinct brand identities for the Lightning and Bonneville, with a more “reliable” image for BSA, though such things are relative…

1969 BSA Lightning L Front Lamp

With similar displacements, power and performance were closely matched: the undersquare Triumph motor was a bit more torquey than the slightly oversquare BSA and both were OHV engines with the BSA featuring more modern “unit” construction behind those distinctive egg-shaped cases. Period riders often slotted the Triumph’s more easily-tuned engine into the lightweight, rigid BSA frame to create the TriBSA, a bike in the spirit of the more well-known Triton.

1969 BSA Lightning L Side Tank

The BSA’s 654cc twin put 52hp through a four-speed gearbox and was good for 108mph. Unfortunately, although the oversquare BSA was revvier, it was still a big parallel twin and using the higher revs broke bulb filaments with irritating regularity when chasing that power.

From the original eBay listing: 1969 BSA 650 Lightning for Sale

I am offering for sale this original and unrestored 1969 BSA 650 Lightning.  I received the bike in non running condition, with a 12 inch over extended front end, after market head light and brackets and one shorty muffler. The engine turned over with weak compression , but smoothly. The odometer indicated just over 2000 miles, and it`s last state inspection sticker was from 1974. The tires were original Dunlop `Made in England ` K70`s and the wheels were badly rusted on the bottom side from having been buried in earth. the bike had been in a barn, but apparently with a wet muddy floor. I proceeded to disassemble most of the bike , with the intent of leaving it as original as I could. I replaced the wheels with other ones from my stock, and cleaned and greased the wheel bearings. There is an almost new Asian K70 replica tire on the rear, and an original K70 on the front with good tread but has some sidewall checking. I sourced an original 1969 BSA front end with all correct components from my inventory, disassembled and cleaned it thoroughly and reassembled with new seals and all good component parts. I cleaned and polished all of the chrome parts to the best of my ability, and rubbed out the original vintage custom paint, which had apparently been done when the bike was still fairly new. I removed the top end, and found the rings to be stuck in the ring lands, and some rust in a couple of valve seats causing the low compression. The bottom end was clean and tight and still wet with oil from 1974 so decided not to disassemble it. I removed and thoroughly cleaned the pistons, and replaced them with new Hastings rings, honed the cylinders, replaced all gaskets, and removed, reseated and replaced the valves. Everything looked good. crankshaft end play is minimal and timing side bush shows minimal wear.(.002 clearance measured with a feeler gauge.) I also removed, cleaned thoroughly and replaced the oil pump, entire transmission, and primary drive and clutch assembly. I installed a very nice set of vintage Bates cocktail shaker megs with no baffles. They have a very pleasing exhaust note, but not annoyingly loud.

The end result is a bike which starts right up on one or two kicks, runs strong and smoothly, has good clutch action and shifts cleanly through all of the gears, does not smoke, and leakage is very minimal. (chain oiler drips as it should). It is clean and looks presentable, but surely no show bike or trailer queen. It has it`s fair share of ‘patina’ which is the cool way of saying worn chrome and paint, but is well sorted mechanically and electrically. I have no way of knowing if the odometer mileage is correct, although the bike appeared to have low miles. 

1969 BSA Lightning R Side Engine

There’s plenty of pitting and mild corrosion as described, but all that could be repaired if the new owner desired and the bike would work well as a rolling-restoration, since the issues are all cosmetic: as can be seen from the video, the bike starts and runs well, with a nice British twin snarl. There are no bids yet with plenty of time left on the auction, so I’ve no idea if this bike is realistically priced, but this looks like a very nice, rideable example of a late 60’s British icon.

-tad

1969 BSA Lightning R Side Front

Sand-Cast Classic: 1969 Honda CB750 for Sale

1969 Honda CB750 R Side Front

When the Honda CB750 came onto the scene in 1969, beating Kawasaki’s own four-cylinder bike to market by the narrowest of margins, it was a revelation: four-cylinder motorcycles were previously the domain of luxury or high-end sporting manufacturers like Ariel or MV Agusta. But the CB750, while certainly not cheap, was an affordable alternative to the established large displacement bikes from the European manufacturers, offering refinement and reliability previously unheard of at that price-point. The specifications seem so unexciting now, but that’s because every other manufacturer needed to produce similar machines, or be left in the dust.

And Honda didn’t stop with their 750: that initial CB gave birth to a whole range of four-cylinder, five-speed bikes, including a 350, a 400, a 500, and a 550. The fours were often heavy, compared to their twin-cylinder or two-stroke competition. But they offered an unmatched level of sophistication compared to those relatively crude machines.1969 Honda CB750 L Side

For a long time, four-cylinder bikes from Honda, Kawasaki, and Suzuki were being regularly chopped into bits as part of the burgeoning cafe racer scene, owing to their low prices, power, and solid construction. This one will not be subjected to that sort of treatment. It’s an early model CB750, with the sand-cast engine cases that are so desirable among fans of this bike.

1969 Honda CB750 R Side Rear

From the original eBay listing: 1969 Honda CB750

In their 100th anniversary issue, Motorcyclist magazine named the 1969 Honda CB750 as the “Bike of the Century,” and this one may be the bike of this century! I bought it 30 years ago from the original owner, a schoolteacher in Chicago, who had kept it as immaculately as I have ever since. I’ll try to keep this text short as you true lovers of vintage Hondas know the story very well by now, but the term “sandcast” is abused so much on eBay it bears re-telling. 

Soichiro Honda was a wise businessman and when he developed this breakthrough machine in the 1960s era that was dominated by British twins & triples, and he wasn’t sure it would sell with its daring 4 cylinders, 4 exhaust pipes, 4 carbs and front disk brake. To play it safe, Honda cast the engine blocks in rough sand molds rather than investing in much smoother (and more costly) metal molds. When the bike started selling well, they invested in the metal casts and all models after VIN # 7,414 have a smooth engine block finish, making these early bikes with a rough “sandcast” finish very rare. 

How rare is this one? Chassis VIN # = 374 and engine = #379, only five digits apart! Why are they apart? Hondas were shipped from Japan in separate crates of engines & chassis, and then assembled in California in random fashion. Many sandcasts have frame & engine numbers that are hundreds of digits apart, so this one’s close numbers are rare indeed. If you check the Sandcast web site (www.cb750sandcastonly.com) and scan the registry, you’ll see this one listed as #18 and with its very close #s for the chassis & engine. 

What’s also special about this bike is it is a rider, not a “trailer queen.” It had 18,000 miles on it when I bought it, and I’ve put another 6,000 miles on it since, generally short trips every month in the summer to keep it mechanically sound. It runs like a “dream” (forgive the Honda pun!) and has been maintained by some of the best vintage Honda mechanics whose identity I’ll only reveal to the buyer to not drive them nuts with too many phone calls early on.

1969 Honda CB750 L Side Engine

There are plenty of additional details over at the listing, so take a gander if you’re a fan of this bike. There are four days left on the auction, with bidding up to $27,000 and the reserve not yet met. That might seem to be a princely sum, but the really rare, early CB’s do command all that and more.

1969 Honda CB750 Headlamp

For a long time, the very reliability and ubiquity of the UJM was their downfall: people treated them like the appliances they were designed to be. A vintage Triumph is going to require regular fiddling and adjustment, and will likely leak at least a bit of oil. They’re full of character, fully capable of cutting a rug and they look great doing it. But vintage European bikes ownership is more like a relationship: you’re invested, an enthusiast. Japanese bikes of the period were notable because they generally flat worked. Just add gas and tires.

But that also means that, when Honda or Kawasaki introduced their latest and greatest model, old bikes were just that: old bikes. And often left to decay, or sold on to less sympathetic owners more concerned with cheap transportation than maintaining an heirloom motorcycle. But considering what early Z1’s and Honda CB750’s are going for these days, the joke’s on them.

-tad

1969 Honda CB750 R Side

Vintage Race Replica: 1969 Triumph Daytona T100 Percy Tait Replica for Sale

1969 Triumph T100 Daytona Race Bike R Side

Sorry for the lack of posts everyone: I’m travelling right now, and it’s been making regular updates difficult. Bear with me and we should be back on track soon!

Today’s bike is a pretty cool vintage racing Triumph Daytona that appears to be extremely well-prepared and is specifically built with endurance and long-distance racing in mind. If you’re not familiar with Percy Tait, you likely won’t be surprised to find that he raced Triumphs, and was also a Triumph development rider and racked up huge miles on various prototypes. Wikipedia tells me he is alive and well and is currently a champion… breeder of rare sheep.

Does it get any more English than that?

1969 Triumph T100 Daytona Race Bike L Side Rear

There is plenty of additional information at the original eBay listing: 1969 Triumph Percy Tait Replica

T100 Daytona as used 1969 Belgian Grand Prix in Spa where it took second place behind an MV Agusta ridden by Giacomo Agostini.

With the rare Ken Sprayson Frame only made for the 1969 GP Triumph machine. 
Ridden on the Manx Grand Prix 2003 and 2004 by York Runte.
Tuning by Winkelmann and OIF-Racing teamready too race, tested 2014 in Pannoniaring Hungary, was ridden two times the Isle of Man Manx grand prix with good results 2003 and 2004. All working, tested, and proved: no “need some work” or funny constructions that fall apart in the first lap…

65.5mm stroke as T100, belt conversion, stainless exhaust tested and optimized with test bench
specially made 5 speed gearbox
47.5 horsepower on the rear wheel at 7500 revs, good torque, smooth running no hole at some revs…. 
Vibrations absolutely okay, much better than all other racers I was riding before

Yes, you could tune for some more power at higher revs and with losing some torque in the midrange, the former owners decided this is a good compromise of smooth running, less repair than with the last 5 extra horsepower you could get out of this engine.  There is an extra pair of new forged pistons and cylinder with the bike that could be changed to bit more compression or just used as spare part and copy the momental piston shape.
This engine version is for long distance races like the Isle of Man.

1969 Triumph T100 Daytona Race Bike R Side Front

It’s pretty cool that the original bike’s claim to fame was actually losing to the peerless Agostini! There’s no shame in that! The bike is currently located in Munich, Germany and is listed with a $16,500 Buy It Now price, which would normally be a bit steep for a Triumph, but actually seems pretty fair for such a well-prepared vintage race bike.

-tad

1969 Triumph T100 Daytona Race Bike

US Market Beemer: 1969 BMW R69US for Sale

1969 BMW R69US L Side

While BMW certainly made conservatively-styled, even stodgy-looking bikes they were, much like the majority of BMW’s modern offerings, “gentleman’s express” sportbikes. Powered by a 594cc version of their classic “flat” twin and shaft drive that could push the bike just north of “the ton” and cruise at 90mph all day long, the R69S was the ideal motorcycle for wide-open spaces and it was correspondingly popular in the US.

1969 BMW R69US Clocks

That popularity in the US market actually led to the specific model you see here. While the standard R69S used Earles forks that had advantages over early telescopic forks in terms of performance under braking, but were relatively heavy, the “US” versions featured telescopic forks instead of BMW’s more typical Earles forks, and deleted the sidecar mounting lugs.

Although this change was designed to modernize the looks of the bike and appeal to the US market, the change worked well and even saved a bit of weight compared to the Earles fork models.

1969 BMW R69US L Side Rear

From the original eBay listing: 1969 BMW R69US for Sale

I am selling this outstanding bike for a long-time friend; an internationally established collector of rare BMW motorcycles.  This R69US is completely restored to near perfect in Granada Red.  The bike will bring you years of pleasure whether for show, riding or just its investment value.

As always I reserve the right to end this auction early as the bike is for sale in other venues and may sell before this auction ends, so bid your highest price early.  This bike is located in Blackhawk California.

1969 BMW R69US Engine

The styling of the R69 is conservative, but these look great in bright red, rather than the conservative BMW black, and I’m a huge fan of bar-end turn signals. At $15,000 with no takers as yet, this may be a bit rich, although you certainly would be hard-pressed to find a more polished vintage bike in terms of both looks and riding experience.

-tad

1969 BMW R69US R Side

Vintage Race Bargain: 1969 Suzuki Hustler T250 Road Racer

1969 Suzuki T250 R Side

Well, it’s the dead of winter, and good bikes have been a little thin on the ground of late. Interestingly, some nice vintage track bikes like this Suzuki “Hustler” T250 have been popping up. Maybe racers just plan a bit further ahead than other motorcyclists, clearing out their garages in preparation for the upcoming season?

1969 Suzuki T250 Front

The T250 was launched in 1969 and, in spite of the “Hustler” name that conjures up images of supersonic Cold War bombers, isn’t really the most exotic model. But don’t let the workmanlike mission of the bike fool you into thinking this is some stamped-steel cheapie step up from a scooter: as was typical of Japanese motorcycles from the period, even this relatively basic motorcycle featured a pretty high-level of specification, with the world’s first production motorcycle six-speed transmission and automatic oil-injection for the air-cooled two-stroke.

1969 Suzuki T250 Engine Detail

That sweet six-speed allowed the rider to make good use of the narrow, stroker powerband and could push the 247cc bike to almost 100mph. Although the bike had little punch down low, it could pull smoothly through the lower part of the rev range until things got more exciting.

1969 Suzuki T250 Dash

This one has been converted to a racing machine which, although it seems an unlikely choice at first, makes plenty of sense upon reflection. These were raced when new with reasonable success when new, and the lower-specification and relatively unstressed nature of the motorcycle means less maintenance during the season. It may not be the fastest little thing on the track, but it should be reliable, and while “win-or-crash” riding can be great to watch on TV, it’s consistency that wins championships: you have to actually finish races to earn points…

1969 Suzuki T250 L Side Detail

From the original eBay listing: 1969 Suzuki T250 Road Racer for Sale

Suzuki T250 racer. Last raced MidOhio Vintage Days 2014. Bike runs great, has good power, shifts flawlessly and handles well. Tires not new, but still good for racing. Has been raced in Ahrma and WERA.  Not the fastest bike out there, but will hold its own. Also a great bike to start vintage racing. Selling due to old age, me not the bike. Time to move on to a more sedate hobby.  With slight modification to pipes Yamaha DG pipes will work.  Runs great as is never exceeds decibles allowed. Engine is basically stock, rotor windings have been removed and bike runs total loss. Battery is under the seat hump. Bump start only, but fires right off. Has not been raced alot, but has been to Daytona and Mid Ohio a couple of times. 

1969 Suzuki T250 Gauge

With just a couple days left on the auction, there are plenty of people watching this listing: a $1,500 Buy It Now seems like a steal for such a ready-to-go little machine. Not the most illustrious model, but it’s prepared for the track and in really great shape, considering it’s difficult to find any models from the 1960’s in this kind of condition.

And if you’re a road-only type of rider, I don’t think it’d be too hard to track down a charging system and some lights to return it to road use.

-tad

1969 Suzuki T250 L Side Front

Clean Commando: 1969 Dunstall Norton 750

1969 Norton Dunstall R Front

Today, we have a very clean Dunstall Commando 750 . The seemingly modular nature of British motorcycles of the 1960’s allowed for a dizzying number of permutations: compact singles and parallel twins from Norton and Triumph fitted to frames from either manufacturer, with non-unit gearboxes that allowed additional installation flexibility… And that’s before outside companies like Dunstall and Rickman got into the act, with purpose-built racing and road machines so different from the donor bikes that they were sometimes considered manufacturers in their own right.

1969 Norton Dunstall L side

After getting his start customizing and then racing a Norton Dominator in the late 1950’s, mating the twin-cylinder engine with a Norton Manx gearbox and frame, Paul Dunstall parlayed his unlikely success with the hybrid machine into a business producing a range of tuning parts for British twins.

Instead of focusing on frames like other British businesses, Paul Dunstall tuned engines and offered a range of bolt-on parts to improve performance, as well as completely built machines based on various British brands.

1969 Norton Dunstall Dash

Although complete bikes fit into general “levels” of performance and customization, there were many options in the Dunstall catalog, and no two bikes are exactly alike. This particular bike has twin discs at the front, although the seller does mention that the original drum is included with the sale, so you can make that switch to old-school aesthetics if you like. The twin-disc set up was available from Dunstall, so the current set up is period-correct and should provide reliable stopping if you plan to ride rather than display the bike.

1969 Norton Dunstall L Foot Control

The original listing includes details from the build sheet regarding the engine and options for the rest of the machine: 1969 Dunstall Norton Commando for Sale

Here we have a Genuine Dunstall 750 Commando that that received a complete restoration early this year.  I purchased this bike from the original owner who in 1981 completely disassembled it.  It remained in boxes since 81′ until I rescued it in 2011.  This is an original bike that was ordered from Dunstall’s 1968-1969 Catalogue.  I have the original build sheet that was provided to the new owner upon purchase.  You will also see a picture from a motorcycle magazine in the UK that featured a 69′ 750 Dunstall just like this one.
 
First I want to say that corners were not cut during this EXTENSIVE AND ALSO EXPENSIVE restoration.  These early frames had a weak spot where the top frame meets the neck.  They would crack and the factory had a recall on them.  This frame was not one of the bikes that received the upgrade so I had a professional welder do this.  Pictures of the upgrade are also available (before and after).  I replaced the red plastic brake lines for more modern braided lines.  Plastic red lines are also included.  Also included is the original early Dunstall Decibel 2-2 exhaust system. These are very rare and earlier than the famous 2-1-2 system.  They were originally black so I had the mufflers ceramic coated.  The pipes need new nuts and collars soldered back on.  They are are in pristine condition.  The seat covers still wears the original leather on top.  I had my upholstery guy remake a new cover using the original top side leather.
 all sides and red bead are new.
1969 Norton Dunstall Rear Hub
With five days left and bidding up to $7,900, there’s still plenty of time to get in on the action, and I’d expect bidding to go a good bit higher: this bike is in excellent condition and represents a high-water-mark for Dunstall in terms of style and performance. While Dunstall continued into the 1970’s and added Japanese manufacturers to its range, the Norton-based machines have a definite cachet.

-tad

1969 Norton Dunstall Cockpit

1969 Moto Guzzi V700 Cafe Racer for Sale

1969 Moto Guzzi V700 Cafe L Side

Now here’s a bike you don’t see every day: a “loop-framed” Moto Guzzi cafe racer. If something looks a bit different about this particular Guzzi custom, it’s because it was built from the earlier V700 touring model, rather than the more sporting models that featured the later, Lino Tonti-developed frame from the V7 Sport.

1969 Moto Guzzi V700 Cafe L Side Dash

Prior to the Sport, v-twin Guzzis were employed extensively by police and military organizations, in addition to the public, but saw little use on the race track as they were tall and relatively heavy. While the origin of the V700 powertrain was a very odd light military tractor, it was simple, durable, and powerful, with shaft drive and a simple pushrod valvetrain. The longitudinal engine configuration in v-twin Guzzis does lead to some “torque-reaction” where the motor twists along the axis of crankshaft rotation when revved, but it’s mostly a characterful difference and has little impact on performance.

1969 Moto Guzzi V700 Cafe L Rear Suspension

Most cafe Guzzis are derived from the Tonti-framed T-series machines: they’re relatively cheap and plentiful. The new arrangement moved the alternator from the top of the crankcase to the front of the engine and set the powertrain in a brand new frame designed with a low center of gravity. This particular machine goes for a more classic look [excepting the tail section] by using the earlier model.

1969 Moto Guzzi V700 Cafe R Tail

From the original eBay listing: 1969 Moto Guzzi V700 Cafe Racer for Sale

Rebuilt motor and lowered front end by Guzzi Classics in Signal Hills CA.
Powder coated frame and parts.
Custom seat with integrated led light, flashing brake led lights.
New front brake pads rears are good, Duralast Extreme Battery, Bosch Coil and new wiring.
Runs great and sounds amazing!! Tons of torque and Great handling. Everything is in great working order
Suspension   Front: Adjustable Gsx R front fork with hydraulic damping
Rear: Swing-arm with 2 V-Rod hydraulic shock absorbers

The result here is definitely less sleek than the usual Guzzi custom, but has a more traditional style: the term “cafe racer” gets thrown around these days to describe any old garage-built sportbike with clip ons, rearsets, and a set of megaphones.  But this one is much closer to the real look and style of all those Tritons and home-brew road-racers that really best embody the era.

1969 Moto Guzzi V700 Cafe Head

Compared to other classic bikes, maintenance on a Guzzi is a snap: gust look at those cylinder heads sticking out in the breeze! Now picture how easy it would be to adjust the valves. And when time comes to lube the chain… Wait: there is no chain! While shaft drive is intrinsically heavier than a chain, loop-frame Guzzis can be made to handle. Just check out this clip of Japanese shop Ritmo Sereno’s loop-frame custom out on the track.

The value of classic Guzzis begin to increase, and now is you chance to grab one before prices climb out of reach. While a more original example might make better sense in terms of value, you certainly won’t find a bike that will better express your desire to stand out in a crowd.

-tad

1969 Moto Guzzi V700 Cafe R Side

My Dad always called the place Monkey Wards but I never saw a monkey there: 1969 Wards Riverside Benelli Cobra

1969 Wards Riverside for sale

When I was kid Montgomery Wards was at the mall and they sold TV’s, clothes, tools and other necessaries for the common Merican. I liked going there but only because trips up town with my Dad were funny. He never used the right words for anything. He replace the correct words with similar words and I giggled every time. Here’s something I never saw at Monkey Wards though. If I knew these were there I would have begged to go. In the late 60’s and early 70’s the Italians were making some of the sexiest motorcycles in history and rebranding them with any name the distributors wanted. Did you know you could buy a whole house from Sears? Yeah, and when you arrived at your newly purchased sears built house with all sears appliances a Sears branded Benelli could be sitting in the garage. You could just order it out of a catalog. Amazon? You paying attention?

This particular Wards bike is a very desirable bike among collectors and is priced very fairly with it’s BIN.

1969 Wards Riverside for sale on eBay

$(KGrHqZHJC4FC2vIR8qJBQ)nsr,0M!~~60_12

From the seller…

Selling a rare and mint condition 1969 Binelli Cobra 125cc,This bike condition from 1-10 is an easy 9.A beautiful Italian cafe bike that was produced in Italy but sold by Montgomery Wards hence the name Wards Riverside.

Click here to check out the auction

~Buck

$T2eC16NHJHQE9nzE)k!WBQ)nsQw!FQ~~60_12

1969 BENELLI 125 SPORT SPECIAL

Had to post this. It has the word “sport” right in the name. Also, these are pretty special bikes. I have recently started gaining knowledge of 1960’s Italian bikes. The more I learn the more I like them. These bikes are a perfect example of form and function blended together to make a very sporting small cc bike. I know 125cc’s probably don’t come to mind when you think and race bikes. In the beginning or road racing though small cc races were every bit competitive and translated to sales for the motorcycle companies that could consistently win. The Italians were a big part of that time period.

1969 Benelli 125 Sport Special for sale on eBay

The seller is to the point:

  A very nice original 1969 BENELLI 125 SPORT SPECIAL 125. This is a fairly hard to find model and is one of the best Italian motorcycles of the sixties. Overhead valve 4 stroke. 5 speed. A FAST 125!!

    Original factory paint. Correct Radaelli Aimon Sport rims. New exhaust system. Good running and riding condition.  Speedo reads 11625 kms (approx 7220 miles).

    Clear California title in my name.

    You are welcome to visit in Tarzana (San Fernando Valley part of Los Angeles). 

    Can crate and ship to most major US cities for approx $300 depending on distance.

Even if you aren’t interested in small cc bikes this one needs to be seen. Everything about this bike flows into the next. Also if you want to see a small bike go for big money this one is something to see.

~Buck