Tagged: 1970

Single and Italian: 1970 Ducati 450 Mark 3 for Sale

1970 Ducati 450 Mark 3 R Side Front

This fine Saturday finds this Ducati 450 Mark 3 looking for a home. Although Ducati no longer makes single-cylinder motorcycles, they were the company’s bread-and-butter until the small-displacement Pantah twins arrived in the early 1980’s. The bevel-drive twins grabbed much of the glory, but their smaller, simpler siblings have a long history on the street and in competition. In recent years, collectors have been gobbling these up and prices have been increasing accordingly.

1970 Ducati 450 Mark 3 L Side Detail

The singles were available as sporty racers, practical standards, and even dirt bikes, with a range of displacements from 160 to 450cc’s. They were sophisticated machines, with a tower-shaft driven, single overhead-cam. The 450 Desmo models remain at the top of the heap, but bikes like this 450 Mark 3 are much sought-after as well, with displacement that allows for real-world riding and even highway use.

1970 Ducati 450 Mark 3 L Side

From the original eBay listing: 1970 Ducati 450 Mark 3 for Sale

Bevel Ducati 450 Mark 3 non-Desmo

A cosmetic make over with a low miles strong stock engine with a new top end gasket and seal kiits. bore and everything else inside is like new. Use the “Buy it Now” and get free crated shipping to most of the lower 48 states, with discounts for overseas shipping.

Tank and tool boxes have fresh paint perfect
Frame has good paint
Rebuilt Dellorto 29mm VHB
New points, condenser and plug
New key switch (two keys)
Alloy wheels
Stainless steel spokes
New Michelin tires
New battery
Rebuilt front forks
Rebuilt shocks (Jupiter type)
New cables
New reproduction exhaust system
Tank had been repainted and the chrome panels was unable to save them (silver painted)
Overall the chrome is in good shape for 40+ years, except the chrome on the rear fender is peeling
The seat needs a recover: the pan is solid with no rust (my guy is booked up until 2015)

The seller also included a video of the bike running and idling.

1970 Ducati 450 Mark 3 Dash

With just over 24 hours left in the auction, bidding is up to $4,850 with the reserve, unsurprisingly, Not Yet Met. The Buy it Now price is set at $8,995 which seems reasonable for a 450 Mark 3: while smaller singles can definitely be had for less, the 450’s have been steadily increasing in value. With free shipping to most of the US at that price, I’m a bit surprised there’ve been no takers, since the bike looks to be in pretty nice shape. Any Ducati fans out there care to comment?

-tad

1970 Ducati 450 Mark 3 R Side

 

Something a Little Different: 1970 Norton 750S Custom

1970 Norton Custom L Rear

The iconic Commando was an example of classic British ingenuity: decidedly old-tech, but featuring simple innovations to keep it competitive in the marketplace. A needed bump in power necessitated a corresponding increase in displacement. That increased displacement led to unacceptable shaking from the bigger slugs. The solution? Norton’s Isolastic system that separated the rider from numbing vibrations.

And the primitive pre-unit engine and gearbox design was turned into an advantage: Norton could easily revise the parallel twin to cant it forward and make it look like it’s leaning forward aggressively into the wind, clearing up additional space for carburetors and airbox.

1970 Norton Custom R Engine

This one’s something of an odd duck, not quite a cafe racer, not really a cruiser, a bike that was built to look sporty, but in a laid-back sort of way. Like it’s trying to say, “Hey, I like to have fun and go fast and all, but I’m way too cool to try all that hard…” As if the builder was kind of a cruiser-guy but realized that, for the most part, British bikes can be turned into fine bobbers, but make really weirdly-proportioned choppers…

With its lowered stance and sporty style, it reminds me of the Harley 883 Sportsters I’ve seen with mid-pegs and clip-on bars, sort of a “drag-café” style.

1970 Norton Custom Dash

Some little details need to be put right like the weirdly canted tach, single-sided pipe wrap, and the droopy taillight. And are those highway pegs?! Regardless, this is someone’s particular vision of the perfect bike, but should be very easy to change if it’s not quite to your taste. And photos suggest that it’s been cared for, or at the very least thoroughly washed before the pictures were taken…

From the original eBay listing: 1970 Norton Custom for Sale

This 1970 Norton custom is a very nice ride for the person that enjoys being different. Not everyone has anything like this one. It has been lowered and made to look very different than the scrambler it started as. It runs and shifts through the gears nicely. It sat for about a year and a half though and needed the carb cleaned. Having done that we inserted new plugs and a new battery. The paint is not perfect but decent. I do not have the original seat or scrambler pipes for the bike. All that you see is what you get (the only way I know it was a scrambler was from the word of the previous owner). I liked the style of it so I bought it, wasn’t going for the scrambler remake. Having said that, I consider the bike somewhat of a project. There are no turn signals or mirrors on the bike… I have ridden it this way with no problem but it is probably not exactly legal. The headlight, brake light and speedometer all worked when parked but are not working at this time. I will need to go through and see if I can fix but I am no electrician. This is a super cool bike that really looks and sounds great. Tires are in good shape and the engine number matches the title. There is no serial number plate like on my other Norton.

According to the seller, this bike was built up from a Scrambler, Norton’s dual-sport variant of the Commando that featured taller suspension, a different seat, and high-pipes. Like the Ducati singles, there are many common parts shared with other Norton models, and it’s pretty easy to mix-and-match to build something that suits your style.

1970 Norton Custom Front

Purists may scream, and riders may bemoan the loss of do-it-all dual-sport ability, but the price is pretty low: bidding is currently at $1,100 and the asking price is set at $5,500. $5k will buy you a pretty wide range of bikes both new and old these days, but this one looks to be worth consideration if you’re into riding and not collecting. It’s no trailer-queen and could make a really nice bike for someone with the appropriate expectations.

-tad

1970 Norton Custom R Side

1970 Moto Guzzi Nuovo Falcone

1970 Moto Guzzi Falcone L Side

Unofficial Moto Guzzi week continues with this interesting example. Prior to the introduction of their v-twin, the Italian firm’s bread-and-butter was a line of big, lazy singles characterized by stump-pulling torque that made proper gear-selection an optional and generally unnecessary activity.

1970 Moto Guzzi Falcone R Side Detail

Built from 1969 to 1977 the Nuovo Falcone was designed as a follow up to the classic Falcone [“hawk”] and intended primarily for government consumption, although a civilian model was produced and many ex-government examples made their way to the private market. The original Falcone was beloved of police and military forces for its durable and extremely flexible powerplant that featured a horizontal, 500cc single cylinder engine and distinctive exposed flywheel. The horizontal layout led to good aerodynamics and a low center of gravity, and the exposed flywheel allowed for a lighter, more compact engine since the cases didn’t have to actually, you know: go around the flywheel. This also made sure that the inside of your left boot was buffed to a high sheen…

1970 Moto Guzzi Falcone Dash

However, the newly designed machine featured an entirely new engine that seemed to lack the original’s incredible durability and suffered from some development issues that plagued it throughout it’s lifespan. It also didn’t have that really cool exposed flywheel/shoe buffer feature.

1970 Moto Guzzi Falcone L Side Detail

From the original eBay listing: 1970 Moto Guzzi Nuovo Falcone for sale

This is a nice example of a Nuovo Falcone.  Was not sold in the U.S. but this motorcycle has been imported and has a valid US title.  Been in a museum for close to ten years.  Will need a battery.  Absolutely a terrific Moto Guzzi.  If you have any questions, please call Jim at 203-912-1104.  The mileage is in KM.

1970 Moto Guzzi Falcone R Side Rear

As with any machine with “notorious” reliability issues, many have been fixed over time: substandard parts are replaced or upgraded, or a specific example just happens to work as intended. I don’t know what it would take to make this example into a solid, useable example, especially since it’s been sitting on display for a decade. The original Falcone was an ideal rideable classic, but this one may work best in its current role as a display machine, unless a new owner is ready to do significant work to make it road-worthy.

-tad

1970 Moto Guzzi Falcone L Side Tank Detail

1970 Norton Commando 750 Short-Stroke Production Racer

1970 Norton Commando L Side

The rakish Norton Commando epitomizes everything that people love about classic British motorcycles: they’re sporty to ride, handsome to look at, and very involving in both the good and bad meanings implied by that term. These parallel-twin sportbikes are durable and reward their owners with character and performance, but famously require careful regular attention: weekend tinkering is all part of the experience although, unlike some of the more obscure bikes sometimes featured here, maintenance and performance parts are readily available.

1970 Norton Commando Cockpit

Introduced in 1967 and displacing 745cc’s with pre-unit construction that was rather unimpressive in specification, the machine proved to be popular and successful on road, track, and in the press. The Commando’s distinctive leaned-over engine was largely an aesthetic change from the earlier version fitted to the Atlas, although Norton also claimed an improved center of gravity and increased space for carburetors and airbox.

1970 Norton Commando Engine Detail

More revolutionary was the bike’s “Isolastic” frame that used a system of rubber mounts to reduce the significant vibrations of the parallel-twin powerplant. While effective, the system does require careful set up [see above under “weekend tinkering”] for optimum performance: too little movement and you might as well rigidly mount the engine, too much and you get sloppy handling.

When properly adjusted, the system gave excellent handling and comfort, but vibrations still plagued the Commando throughout its production run, since everything attached to the engine was still subject to significant stress: all of the tropes about parts vibrating loose, cracking, and falling off apply here.

1970 Norton Commando L Rear

This one appears to be well maintained and features a number of very nice period-appropriate modifications. The seller provides a pretty comprehensive list of the work that’s gone into it. From the original eBay listing: 1970 Norton Commando Short Stroke Production Racer

This Norton was built around a 1970 title and frame. It has a brand new old stock 750 short stroke engine 80.5mm stroke 77mm bore. Has a new Quaife reinforced shell 5 speed all new bearing. New kickstart shaft. Kickstart is straight up rare original. (not a featherbed) New inner cover. R camplate. Engine has all the rare parts RH7 head with 9/32 in stem oversize valves. Nimonic ex valves. New springs, rockers and rocker spindles. Pistons by Omega, steel rods, new crank. Hi pro cam. New lifters. New bearings.. Carbs are new 34mm Mk2 with cable operated chokes, not the Mickey Mouse on/off type. All new lines and cables. New Doherty quick throttle smith drive.. Inst were rebuilt and are both spot on. New inst cables. (Norton has only gone 25 miles) no leaks..

When the British biking industry fell on hard times in the 70’s and 80’s, Norton was one of the victims and, in spite of various attempts to resuscitate them, remain in limbo. A shame, given the resurgence of the modern classics sold by Triumph, Ducati, and others. Surely, there’s room for one more?

Update! One of our readers wrote in with the following bit of information about this machine:

FYI – This Norton is from Ron Fraturelli, one of the best Norton guys in the
country who was a Norton dealer and race bike builder back in the 70s.

http://nortoncommando.com/
http://www.accessnorton.com/ron-fratturelli-nortons-t10790.html

Thanks for the information!

-tad

1970 Norton Commando R Fairing

1970 Ducati 450 MK3 For Sale in Oregon

Offered from one of favorite eBay’ers, “shelbob“, who has been liquidating his collection all year, we have this absolutely beautiful Ducati 450.

1970 Ducati 450 MK3 For Sale on eBay

from the seller:

ULTRA RARE 1970 DUCATI 450 MK3 DESMO ,PAINT AND CHROME ARE EXCELLENT ,PROFESIONALY RESTORED A FEW YEARS BACK ,ALL ORIGINAL ,RUNS EXCELLENT FRESH TUNE UP WITH NEW PIRELLI TIRES ,STARTS VERY EASY ,PULLS LIKE A FRIEGHT TRAIN ,MUCH MORE FUN TO RIDE THAN A 750 BEVEL TWIN ! EVERYTHING WORKS ,NO ISSUES ,OTHER THAN A SILVER SHOTGUN THERE IS NOT A RARER PRODUCTION DUCATI SINGLE ,THIS MODEL NEVER COMES UP IN THE US FOR SALE ,MOST WENT TO AUSTRALIA WERE THEY ARE CHERISHED ,SOME WERE MADE INTO SILVER SHOTGUN FAKES .THIS IS A 2 OWNER BIKE WITH CURRENT CALIFORNIA TITLE AND CURRENT REGISTRATION , WE AT OWNERS EXPENSE CAN SHIP WORLDWIDE. THESE BIKES ARE IMPOSSIBLE TO FIND IN ANY CONDITION AND ARE BECOMING MORE VALUABLE THAN BEVEL TWINS DUE TO THE FACT THEY MADE SO FEW ,THERE NIMBLE AND FAST WITH TONS OF TORQUE THEY FEEL “RIGHT” THIS WOULD BE THE ULTIMATE XMAS GIFT FOR THE DUCATI LOVER IN YOURE LIFE !! I HATE SELLING IT ,I KNOW I WONT BE ABLE TO AFFORD ANOTHER 1 ,ITS A PIECE OF ART THAT YOU CAN BLAST AROUND TOWN ON THAT WILL ONLY GO UP IN VALUE ,RESERVE IS HIGH ON THIS JEWEL ,IF IT SELLS I WILL MISS IT DEARLY ,I PERSONALLY THINK THIS IS THE MOST BEAUTIFUL SINGLE DUCATI EVER MADE. BID TO WIN LIKE THEY USED TO SAY WITH VINTAGE FERRARIS YOU CANT PAY TO MUCH ONLY TO SOON !

From a previously posted Ducati 450 on these pages Brian wrote, “Dr Fabilio Taglioni’s first work with Ducati was in 1954 and their small cc GP bikes. The basic design increased in displacement from 125cc to the 200cc Elite in 1959. The 250cc Monza/Diane/Daytona arrived in 1961, the 350 Sebring in 1965 and finally the 450cc in 1969. Even though the GP bikes offered from the Italian manufacture had been using Desmodromic valve gear, it wasn’t until 1967 that the first road going Single received the positive valve actuating system. The 450 offers those unique pair of opening cams and closing cams.”

dc

1970 Dunstall Norton Commando

I had done a little research about Paul Dunstall when writing about this Triumph back in May, and since then have been keeping an eye out for other bikes claiming to have Dunstall connection. Mostly you find a bike with Dunstall mufflers, maybe a Dunstall replica fairing, but few which claim to be Dunstall Bikes. This Norton Commando offered here on eBay is the only one I have seen with Dunstall in the title.

The seller says

            NICELY RESTORED 1970 NORTON 750 COMMANDO BY DUNSTALL

Paul Dunstall was a racer who decided to market some of the parts that he had developed to go faster, and by 1961 had a catalogue of parts. By 1966 he was developing whole Dunstall motorcycles, starting with “of the shelf” Triumphs, BSA, and Norton. By 1971 Paul has stopped racing and worked full time at creating fast European and Japanese bikes.

From the seller

            IT HAS ON IT ALL OF THE MUCH SOUGHT AFTER DUNSTALL GOODIES THAT MAKE IT SUCH A SPECIAL BIKE, REWORKED HEAD AND CARBS, DUNSTALL EXHAUST AND FAIRING, LARGER OIL PUMP, ETC ETC…

The pictures show a well put together machine with nice paint, shinny chrome, bikini fairing, and cafe seat. It also shows a huge tachometer and no speedo.

For 1971 Dunstall offered the Mark 1 and Mark 11 Norton Commandos in economic or high performance tunes. Pulling from the many parts offered, this could have included new aluminum cylinders, and attention the head porting, as well as mufflers and fairing as mentioned by the seller.

The bike is listed with 1198 miles and is a restoration. But did this Commando start out as an original Dunstall Norton? The seller implies this. Or was is a restoration of a Norton Commando put together with a collection of original Dunstall parts?  With a buy it now price of $16,975 you are going to get a very nice Norton, with some nice Dunstall parts. But at that price I would be surprised if it could get yourself a Dunstall assembled Norton Commando. BB

1970 Dunstall Triumph

During the 1960’s and 70’s there were companies started by ex-racers that took what the factory offered and made it their own. Paul Dunstall was one of these racer/builders and a 1970 Dunstall Triumph is being .

Starting racing when he was just 18, Paul Dunstall designed his own parts to be competitive. By 1961 he had a catalogue of parts, and in 1966 started to build complete bikes. Starting with a stock  Norton, BSA or Triumph, he would strip it down and put it back together with his fairings, seats, and exhaust. He would then replace heavy steel components with lightweight alloy parts. For a few dollars more you could get Dunstall to tune your engine with improved porting, and larger carbs. The great history I found also showed that Paul would work with Universitiy engineers to develope his exhaust for better power.

The seller gives provenance for his bike

Titled as a 1971 Dunstall (engine and frame are matching numbers with a a July build date), not a stateside conversion.  Have documentation from VMCC that it was shipped to Dunstall and the dates.

The history of Paul Dunstall tells that 1970 offered a new twin disk system up front. This bike offers twin disk up front but it is hard to tell enough details to know which set up is offered.

Seller states:

 

The master cylinder and calipers are rebuilt with new pads, 20 miles.Tires are almost new…the wheels are Borranis as is correct for a Dunstall.

For the engine Dunstall replaces the 650cc cylinders with a larger 750cc big bore kit. This engine comes with a Routt steel unit, who was another aftermarket performance designer of the time. Quaife was a name from the period known for the 5 speed transmissions offered on this bike.

The seller also points out the faults:

windshield which has been replaced (Gustafson), bike as not been down while moving, believe it has tipped over and cracked fairing and windshield.  Fairing has had slight repairs done to it……Del’Orto 34mm pumper carbs (not original – should be 32mm Amals)

Yellow may not be a color that you would choose for yourself, but when buying a period modified bike, you often have to accept the period popular colors. Maybe you can paint the spare fairing a color of your choice.

BB

1969 Honda CB750KO

This bike was the beginning of the end of British motorcycles and changed the industry as a whole. It raised the expectations of the buyer by giving them an over head cam engine, 5 speed transmission, disk brakes, electric start, and an oil tight engine. Before 1969 you could not expect any of these unless you rode a factory race bike. The only American manufacture still racing a Flathead motor at a National level. The British 650cc parallel twin would leave more oil on the floor then Joseph Hazelwood left in Alaska. The CB750 was different, but in a good way.

If bikes had baseball card, the back of the CB750 card would be something like this.

736.5cc/67bhp/8000rpm good for a top speed of 120mph.

Dick Mann taking a CB750 to the top step of the Daytona podium in 1970 backed up those number.

This bike is a very early model, just missing the special sand cast label as explained by the seller

The bike is only a few hundred numbers off the last sand cast KO model and it is listed in the CB750 Sand-cast owners club web site. It has all the features of the sand-cast model including the wrinkle tank

The group cb750sandcastonly say that they are not elites and allow non sand cast CB750. Hemming Motors said in their 2006 article that the sand cast models will go in the low 5 figures. After watching Hawaii Five-0, in 2011.

More from the seller

Every nut and bolt was removed from the bike and cleaned and shined. The bike was professionally repainted with factory correct Candy Ruby Red Color Rite paint. The bike is 100% original down to the KO exhaust with no numbers. It also has new period correct Dunlop tires and a new battery.I could go on and on about how beautiful this bike is but I think its best to just let the pictures do the talking…..

and they are nice pictures    BB