Tagged: 1975

Radical Racebike: 1975 Bimota YB1 350GP for Sale

1975 Bimota YB1 L Side

The Bimota YB1 wasn’t originally called the YB1 because it predated Bimota’s traditional naming conventions. Internally, it was known as the Yamaha-Bimota Gran Prix ’74, but later became known as the YB1, the very first Yamaha-engined Bimota. In fact, it was the very first series-production Bimota, if something built in numbers this small can be considered “production.” Powered by either the 250cc or 350cc version of the TZ’s liquid-cooled parallel-twin engine, just twelve of these distinctive and very fast little machines were built.

1975 Bimota YB1 R Side Naked

The bike’s racing success helped pave the way for Bimota’s later, more well-known racing and road bikes and helped to establish BiMoTa as a manufacturer. It’s quite literally possible that, without the YB1, there’d be no Bimota today at all and the face of motorcycling might look very different.

1975 Bimota YB1 R Side Front

Built between 1974 and 1975, the bike included Bimota’s signature racing touches: one-piece bodywork that allowed easy maintenance, a stiff and lightweight tubular frame, adjustable ergonomics, and even a clever eccentric chain adjuster.

1975 Bimota YB1 Tank

From the original eBay listing: 1975 Bimota YB1 350GP for Sale

VIN 12

This is an iconic superare YB1, the first race Bimota with Yamaha TZ competition engine. It was also the second Bimota race model ever built (the first was the unique Paton Bimota) and definitely the first “true” racing Bimota as this model was raced by important names as Lucchinelli, Riondato, Ceccotto, Gallina, etc. This frame was built to be fitted with both Yamaha options 250cc and 350cc, this one is a 350cc. Only 12 units were built making this model extremely rare, desiderable and collectable.

This bike was last paraded at the main Italian event in 2012, kept in collection completely dry since. The paddock stand in pics is coming with the bike.

Race, parade and collect!

1975 Bimota YB1 Engine

Another one from our new best friend “Gianluca” who always seems to have the very coolest bikes for sale! Bidding is up to just $4,550 with the reserve not met and several days left on the auction. I honestly don’t know what this little exotic really should be worth, but it’s one of just twelve built, looks wild, and as an early Bimota is certainly historically significant. The YB1 was available as a kit bike, and supposedly very few were sold with this distinctive bodywork, making this zero-mileage example even more of a unicorn, literally ground zero for the modern sportbike.

-tad

1975 Bimota YB1 R Side

Restored to Perfection: 1975 BMW R90S for Sale

1975 BMW R90S L Front

Today’s BMW R90S is the quintessential German sportbike: fast, stable, and reliable, but just a little bit uptight and unassuming. Or it would be unassuming, if not for that very vivid 70s paint job… By the 1970s, a major shift was well underway in the motorcycling world. Postwar shortages in many markets meant that, throughout the period immediately following World War II, cars were simply too expensive for many people to afford and motorcycles were often used as basic transportation in their place. But by the 1960s, the tide had begun to change and, more and more, motorcycles were seen as luxury items or toys, especially here in the US.

1975 BMW R90S R Rear

Generally stodgy image aside, BMWs had always been involved in racing but, by the 1970s, they felt they needed reach customers outside the lucrative, but steadily aging “old man” demographic. BMW’s traditional customers were aging out, and BMW wanted to reach out to a new crop of riders who were looking for something like a Ducati, but maybe with some comfort thrown in. The Germans may have been trying to create their own SuperSport with the R90S, but that practical Teutonic DNA comes through pretty strongly in both the form and the function.

1975 BMW R90S Dash

That dose of practicality in no way diminishes the performance available and the bike was very competitive in AMA racing immediately after it was introduced. High-compression pistons and performance carburetors meant that the proven pushrod engine, here bumped to 898cc, made 67 very flexible horses that could take the R90S all the way to 125mph, although braking power was never much to write home about.

1975 BMW R90S L Rear

Today’s example looks terrific and appears to be quite the labor of love. From the original eBay listing: 1975 BMW R90S for Sale

This is a perfect restored numbers-matching BMW R90S. Many collectors like a bike in original condition unrestored. This is perfect for somebody who put it in his man cave and enjoy looking at the bike or showing it to somebody. But after 40 years it would not be fun to drive it. All the rubber, bowden and seals and much more thinks getting dry brittle leaking and brake. This one is ready to drive and it is as new as it can be.

I am a 60 year old German engineer and be working on BMW’s my whole life as my hobby and for fun. I am selling this one because I have too many toys and I am downsizing for my retirement. This one is restored to perfection. Look at all the pictures it tells the story. I was working over 2 years on this bike and one thing lead in to another because as a perfectionist nothing is good enough.

Here is a list of what I have done. I am sure this list is not complete but you getting the idea:

  • Frame powder coated.
  • Wheels polished hubs bead blasted new stainless spokes.
  • Every screw on the bike is new and stainless.
  • All the rubber and I mean all what has any rubber in it or on it is new tires, seals, bowden, seat, footpegs and so on.
  • Wheel bearings and brakes are new
  • Every aluminum part on engine, gearbox and final drive is bead-blasted and assembled with new seals
  • Cylinder heads with lead-free valves
  • New pistons and oil rings
  • New clutch complete with spring plate
  • Carbs are overhauled and sealed for over $500
  • New seat complete with pan from Germany
  • Instrument cluster overhauled for over $600 and set to 0 miles
  • This was a low millage bike to begin with and in a very good shape
  • New paint and pin striped by a pro for over $2000.
  • New petcocks and fuel cap.
  • New exhaust system complete.
  • And so on…
  • It comes with the original toolkit, shop rag, metal air pump and manual
  • And I have a box full of receipts what I be afraid off to add up.
  • There is a lot of money in this bike.

1975 BMW R90S Parts

Bidding is very active on this bike and already north of $12,000, with plenty of time still left on the auction and the Reserve Not Met. That’s certainly premium money for an old BMW, but it sounds like you’re getting about as close to a brand-new R90S as is possible, barring a lifetime of tracking down NOS parts and building one from scratch. Certainly, the seller makes a great point: an unrestored, barn-find bike would likely require a ton of work to make it run correctly, or would require constant attention as the little bits mentioned deteriorate and fail. This bike is virtually perfect and ready-to-roll. If you have the cash to spend and want an R90S, this looks like a good choice!

-tad

1975 BMW R90S R Side

Bee Sting: 1975 Yamaha TZ750B for Sale

1975 Yamaha TZ750 L Front2

Looking like the world’s angriest bumble bee, complete with four stingers, this Yamaha TZ750B race bike is ready for a new life, terrorizing tracks in vintage racing classes. And “terror” is probably the right word: with as much as 140hp, the TZ750 was very fast and exceptionally reliable, although the concept of handling was still in its infancy and a “good-handling bike” was any motorcycle that exhibited cornering or straight-line behavior that didn’t involve a terminal death-wobble.

Early TZ750s may not have qualified…

1975 Yamaha TZ750 R Naked

The earliest liquid-cooled two-stroke fours look suspiciously like they were built up from a pair of 347cc parallel-twins to make the TZ700. The later 750cc engine that debuted in 1975 supposedly shared no parts at all with the smaller machines and was essentially a bored-out 500 Grand Prix engine. Power predictably overwhelmed the bike’s rudimentary handling and primitive tires. Early machines used a twin-shock rear, although the frames were eventually updated to a more modern monoshock design as seen here: this particular bike was obviously ahead of its time and uses a rare Kanemoto frame, according to the seller.

1975 Yamaha TZ750 L RearFrom the original eBay listing: 1975 Yamaha TZ750B for Sale

Show Winner – Fresh Rebuild – Race Ready. Very Unique Early TZ750; C&J Mono-Shock Frame equipped, Raced in the 1976 and 1977 Daytona 200!

C&J made 4 special TZ750 mono-shock frames for Erv Kanemoto in the mid 1970`s. They were ridden by Gary Nixon, Freddie Spencer, and Gary Fisher. This particular unnumbered chassis was built using a 1975 TZ750B donor bike, and made it into the hands of AMA Pro rider Cory Ruppelt; he finished in the money in the 1976 Daytona 200 Roadrace on this bike.

Original period equipment includes: Morris Magnesium wheels, Lockheed front calipers, early Vesco fairing, and silenced crossover chambers. 
Modern KR series Dunlop racing tires, D.I.D. endless chain, and Boysen reeds make it track-worthy.

Rebuilt motor has 1 hour track time; tear-down inspection just completed. Un-numbered cases. Genuine TZ750D Master Cylinder just installed – carbs, ignition, controls, forks and C&J modified bodywork are original TZ. The bike is near exactly as raced in the 1970’s including paint. Has been preserved for 30 years on display before being brought back to a rider. Unrestored from the 1970’s, in “as-raced” condition.

The seller also includes some on-track video of the bike doing some parade laps here.

1975 Yamaha TZ750 L Rear Naked

Many classic racebikes are non-running display pieces with too much history for the owners to risk a crash, or because they cannot afford the upkeep on a rare, non-production machine more than forty years old. Luckily, this particular bike comes with period looks, unrestored paint, and a refreshed motor that looks like it’s ready to rock.

-tad

1975 Yamaha TZ750 R Front

Racer for the People: 1975 Yamaha TZ250B for Sale

1975 Yamaha TZ250B R Side

A production roadracer with no street-legal counterpart, the Yamaha TZ250 was a water-cooled update of the older air-cooled TD and TR bikes. Designed so that privateers of the era could pop down to a local dealer and literally buy a bike over the counter that they could expect to be reasonably competitive, the TZ250 cleverly used many production parts to keep costs down: some engine parts were shared with the RD350 and various suspension bits were taken from existing machines.

1975 Yamaha TZ250B L Side Rear

Unlike the often exclusive Hondas, the TZ was an everyman machine, with moderate pricing and strong support in the aftermarket and what it lacked in outright power, it made up for in user-friendliness. But keep in mind that “user-friendly” is relative: in spite of the small displacement, this is a very highly developed racing motorcycle and will require a correspondingly high level of attention to keep it running.

Luckily, it appears that, although this bike has been sitting a while, it appears to have been owned by a racer, not a collector, and the original listing contains tons of detailed information about what has been done to set up, modify, and maintain this machine.

1975 Yamaha TZ250B R Side Rear

From the original eBay listing: 1975 Yamaha TZ250B for Sale

In 1981 I was newly out of high school, bumbling around, partying, chasing girls and trying to figure out my life.  I desperately wanted to become a motorcycle road racer and was privileged to be offered a job as a mechanic at Cycle Works in Stamford, CT.  As it turns out, a year later they were out of business.

I say privileged because Cycle Works was one of the last “real” racing dealerships from the golden era of the nineteen seventies.  This was the kind of shop that you could walk into and see a TZ250 or a race prepped RD400 for sale on the showroom floor or a TZ750 in line for service and race prep, I was twenty years old and thought I had died and gone to heaven.  Years earlier, Mike Baldwin had worked there and had purchased and ran a TZ250.  This TZ250.  Learning to race on an RD350, I then graduated to this TZ250.

The TZ hasn’t seen much action in the last ten years and has spent most of that time in my living room.  A few years back, I redid the motor which included: a freshly plated “F” model cylinder, new pistons, rings seals, bearing etc…, crank rebuilt by Lynn Garland. It has not been started since.

Previously I relocated the temp gauge holder to the opposite side so it wouldn’t interfere with the cables, I have the original tang.  In early 2000, I replaced the original Koni’s with a pair of Works Performance shocks.  The Koni’s will need to be rebuilt.  Other than that it is a really nice example of an early seventies GP bike.  It will have to be gone through if you intend to vintage race, but it’s really to valuable to be ridden in anger. (It is really fast though!)  It also comes with a State of CT title, yes in 1981 you could walk into motor vehicle and register you race bike for the ride. Never rode it on the street though.

1975 Yamaha TZ250B Engine Detail

1974 saw the introduction of the TZ250B, but it was nearly identical to the “A” that was introduced in 1973. The later “C” of 1976 saw the frame changed to a more modern monoshock setup, but this twin-shock bike certainly has plenty of period charm.

With no takers yet at the $13,750 starting bid, this machine is obviously overpriced for the market, or just hasn’t managed to find its audience. Luckily for us, the seller took some very nice pictures for us to drool over as we indulge our own vintage racing fantasies…

-tad

1975 Yamaha TZ250B L Side

Little Brother: 1975 Ducati 750 Super Sport for Sale

1975 Ducati 750SS R Side Front

This beautiful 1975 Ducati 750 Super Sport came as a bit of a surprise to me. I was under the impression that all SS Ducatis were powered by the new 864cc engine from 1975 on, and that the 750 was basically discontinued, but that’s clearly not the case. And it’s obviously not simply a ’74 that’d been sitting around, since the square-case motor was introduced in 1975.

1975 Ducati 750SS L Side

Turns out I was half-right: it appears that all Super Sports were based around the new 900 motor, with the 750 using a sleeved-down version to simplify manufacturing. Other than that, the two bikes were virtually identical in every way, including price. Obviously, most people opted for the 900 version, and sales of the 750 were basically nonexistent, except for certain markets like Australia and Japan.

1975 Ducati 750SS Clocks

The seller is obviously knowledgeable and has owned the bike for a while, so I’ll let him fill you in. From the original eBaly listing: 1975 Ducati 750 Super Sport for Sale

Excellent example of a rare classic collectable 750 Supersport, one of only 250 made.

Basically I’m the third owner of this bike, I have had it over 12 years now. The history being original owner sold the rolling chassis to a racer friend and the motor to another. I  inadvertently bought the race bike as a roundcase found the history and then chased to purchase the original motor. The original owner was a ’75 SS buff had no less than four 900’s and this lone 750 in his fleet. Most people preferred the 900’s over the little brother 750’s hence his reason for selling and parting the bike.

Nowadays this is not the case people are now realizing just how sweet the 750 motor actually is and some prefer the 750 over the 900. Having been in the luxurious position of having one of each you certainly can see and feel the difference. The 750 seems elegant and a smoother bike to ride and there is not much difference in the top end to that of the 900, the 900 just has more torque

The first squarecase 750SS was identified as engine number 075412 this is 075417 very early indeed. The frame number is DM750SS 075436 (the paintwork hides the numbers slightly but it is a genuine frame) It has the correct borrani rims and also has a pair of the very early 40mm dellortos’ without the choke castings. (Same as the greenframes and early 900SS’) most of the early numbered bikes had both, more often than not, probably due to limited production numbers, most ’75 model SS’  only had one – either the front or the rear. They are mounted on the standard steel manifolds particular to this model.

There were only 250 ’75 750’s produced by the factory making them very rare – fewer numbers of these were made to that of the greenframe ’74 models. Essentially the ’75 were made for racing there are specific stories relating to the building of these machines for production races. ’76 onwards they changed significantly, left foot gear change pattern, frame, tank, dash, carbies and manifolds, seat even was different and  were built for general street purpose. More importantly after the ’75 model SS’s the motor’s were not scrutineered by the factory, they dropped the polished rockers and other finer details and attention to detail.

The bike has been meticulously put back together, utilising all factory parts and it runs as good as it looks. The bore is original 80.0mm and the big end is new, it was replaced when the bike was restored. The speedo was re-set when the motor was rebuilt. Actually true mileage is uncertain, irrelevant now as when the bike was rebuilt is was put back together using all of the correct factory parts. It needed nothing other than a set of rings and the big end was changed as a mere precaution whilst the engine was apart.

1975 Ducati 750SS R Side Engine

The bike is located in Australia and the starting bid is $40,000 with no takers yet but plenty of time left on the auction. I’m assuming that eBay is doing the conversion into USD for us, but that’s still a big chunk of change. And while a round-case might be just that bit more desirable and a 900 just that bit more butch, this one’s beautiful condition might make it worth a look for collectors, especially those looking for something with just that little bit of extra rarity.

-tad

1975 Ducati 750SS R Side

Eine Sehr Praktische Fahrrad: 1975 BMW R90S for Sale

1975 BMW R90S L Side Front

By the early 1970’s BMW was saddled with a very stuffy image that was in real need of an update. BMW’s were unsexy. They were bikes for old men. If story that sounds familiar, maybe it will help to think of today’s R90S as the S1000RR of the early 1970’s.

In the immediate postwar period, manufacturers proliferated and churned out cheap transportation by the bucketload, so Europeans could get to work efficiently and affordably. But by the late 60’s things had begun to shift and, with the rise of the Japanese, who were churning out cheap, highly sophisticated motorcycles by the bucketload, BMW was facing a bit of an identity crisis, much in the way that Harley Davidson has in recent years, with their fanbase slowly aging out of motorcycles entirely.

Or just buying cars instead.

1975 BMW R90S Side Rear

The result of BMW’s re-imagining was this stylish machine. It was based on BMW’s proven platform, with the usual host of hot-rod updates to improve performance. A pair of Dell’Orto carbs and higher-compression pistons were fitted, and the 898cc pushrod, OHV engine was a bored out version of the earlier 750 and the engine featured fairly oversquare dimensions. It added up to 67hp and, put through a five-speed transmission, meant a top speed in the neighborhood of 125mph, a very fast neighborhood at the time. For a big sportbike, the BMW was relatively light at 474lbs wet.

1975 BMW R90S R Side Engine

The stylish bikini fairing allowed BMW to compliment the usual tach, speedo, and warning lights with an analogue clock and a volt meter, while twin discs provided improved stopping power over other BMW models, although that wasn’t saying much, and even these upgraded brakes were considered the R90S’s weakest characteristic.

 

1975 BMW R90S R Side Rear

As with Moto Guzzis of the period, the image of the shaft-driven BMW was more touring than sport, but the R90S was successful in competition: in the USA, the American Motorcycling Association organized a new race series for “Superbikes” and the R90S placed first and second in the very first race. But for all the sporting competence, BMW couldn’t completely shake their practical image, and it still featured low-maintenance shaft-drive, would take a set of hard luggage, had impressive range, and could comfortably cruise all day at 80. It was supremely competent, but still just a little bit uptight…

From the original eBay listing: 1975 BMW R90S for Sale

First titled 5/29/1975 in Michigan

Stainless spokes, good tires and battery, K&N air filter

Original large tool kit/roll, tire pump and owners manual

Great running -excellent engine idle

Serviced at BMW Daytona Beach 

Always garaged and covered: no damage, no crashes, no issues

Clock is not working-may be disconnected from battery

Have 2 keys and 2 key blanks, 2 oil filters

Runs like new

1975 BMW R90S Gauges

Geez, “BRAKE FAILURE”?! That’s a terrifying warning light! With 26,000 miles on the clock, this example is very clean and relatively low-mileage: these can and do rack up serious, continent-crossing distances quite regularly. Bidding is up to almost $8,500 with the Reserve Not Met. These are on the rise in terms of value, but I wonder where this one is priced, and whether or not the seller is aiming a bit too high, too soon…

-tad

1975 BMW R90S L Side

Nickel-Plated Rarity: 1978 Rickman CR900 for Sale

1975 Rickman CR900 R Front

Today’s Kawasaki-powered Rickman CR900’s most distinguishing feature, aside from its overall impressive condition, is that stunning paint. Colors like this can be difficult to photograph, but I think the seller has done an excellent job with this unusual paint.

1975 Rickman CR900 L Rear

The “900” obviously indicates the displacement, as the bike was powered by Kawasaki’s powerful 903cc Z1 engine, but stuffed into a gorgeous, stiff nickel-plated frame that significantly improved on the original machine’s merely adequate handling. Which makes sense, since handling improvements were Rickman’s stock in trade. 1975 Rickman CR900 L Front

Started by Don and Derek Rickman, the company began by building off-road racing bikes designed around existing engines and transmissions. By the 1960’s, they’d started building roadcourse and streetbikes, at first based around British twins but later using the new Japanese multis. This was a perfect marriage, since the Honda CB and Kawasaki Z1 were powerful and reliable, but didn’t really have the frames or suspension to make them competitive on track.

1975 Rickman CR900 L Fairing

It’s not really clear how many CR900’s were actually built: Rickman sold these as kits, sans engine, transmission, and electricals. And while you could buy them complete through various shops, many were built at home in the proverbial shed, making the exact numbers built difficult to discern.

1975 Rickman CR900 Cockpit

Regardless, Rickmans of any stripe are hard to find in this condition, regardless of powerplant choice.

From the original eBay listing: 1978 Rickman Kawasaki for Sale

You maybe  looking at one of the rarest bikes on the planet.  This bike is titled as a Rickman and not as a Kawasaki. The  bike is titled as a 1978. The  I.D. plate fixed to the steering neck indicates September, 1977 chassis and is the correct id plate for this bike.  

Almost all of the  Rickman CR900’s, of which few were built, were finished in green This bike has the orgiinal gel coat in red. The bike is original in color and I know of no other with this color. This is an original machine in pristine condition and rides like a rocket ship with the responsive and light frames built by Rickman powered by the Kawaski 900 cc motor. This bike performs as good as any modern bike today. 

The  900 cc motor number is Z1E 238xx.

This Rickman chassis was purchased in England by the original owner while vacationing there. 

The milage on this bike is less than 9,000. Most of these miles were accumulated prior to the motor being installed into the Rickman.  Thus this Rickman frame has seen very limited use.  The original rear sprocket shows virtually no wear. The saddle looks near new. The instruments are from the original Kawasaki and show the mileage covered by both the kaw and the Rickman chassis. If you are looking for an original colectable motorcycle that is sure to increase in value look no further. Rickman motorcycles, are extremely rare and  have proven in the past to be highly desirable and with their limited production should continue to increase in value.

1975 Rickman CR900 Engine

Bidding is up north of $15,000 with four days left on the auction and plenty of interest. Rickman’s show up fairly regularly for sale, but this is the nicest I’ve ever seen. I’m not in the market for a vintage bike at the moment, but I bike like this would definitely be in the running if I had the cash…

-tad

1975 Rickman CR900 R Rear

Little Blue Bomber: 1975 Honda CB400F Super Sport for Sale

1975 Honda CB400F R Side

The introduction of Honda’s CB750 in 1969 did more than simply redefine what a range-topping bike could be. It heralded an onslaught of sophisticated, reliable machine across their entire range: while sporty midsized offerings from the other Japanese manufacturers were often quick and nimble, but powered by peaky, noisy, smoky two-strokes, Honda used sophisticated overhead-cam twins and fours. In fact, their direct competitor for the famous Yamaha RD350 was this bike, the four cylinder CB400F. 1975 Honda CB400F L Front

Powered by a bored-out version of the 350, the 400F engine actually displaced 408cc, and the bike featured a relatively novel six-speed gearbox, something nearly unheard of outside racing circles in an era when most bikes still used only four.

1975 Honda CB400F R Side Detail

The Honda couldn’t hold a candle to the RD in terms of quick and dirty speed, but it beat the little smoker hands-down when it came to sophistication. Unfortunately, the sportbike market wasn’t especially interested in refinement, so the Honda didn’t sell all that well when new, with buyers in the middleweight sports market opting for the light weight and personality of the Yamaha.

But while the Honda was much heavier, handling was still excellent, and riders of the period found plenty of success on track, with race-prepped bikes capable of true giant-slaying ability and top speeds of over 130mph.

1975 Honda CB400F Clocks

From the original eBay listing: 1975 Honda CB400F for Sale

This 1975 Honda 400 Four Super Sport is equipped with a side stand and a center stand which is handy for maintenance. It also has an electric start & a kick start. This is handy if the battery is low, as the starter robs the voltage to the ignition coils. After starting the bike from cold, it needs to warm up on part choke for a few minutes before setting off, or you could find yourself fumbling with the choke whilst riding.

This little guy pulls well from the start (even with its peak power of 37 bhp at 8,500rpm and redline at 10,000 rpm), and with 6 gears to choose from you’ll find your left foot is kept busy if you want to make the most of it. It accelerates well from 0-70 mph, which is the range where most riders will find themselves on this urban super sport. The seating position is slightly bent forward, giving a dominant street fighter feel. The bike handles very well at all speeds providing good cornering and a comfortable ride, and would make a great city commuter anywhere in the world.

This well preserved 1975 Honda CB 400 F only has 12,655 miles on the odometer. The VIN number is CB400F-1027692, Date of Manufacture is 03/75, and Engine ID# is CB400FE-1028229. It is in very nice condition. The bike starts, runs, and shifts very well. The bike is all original with the following exceptions – which were made to get it roadworthy for the new owner:

New “Varnish Blue” paint on gas tank and side covers (professionally done and very nice)

New chrome exhaust muffler

New dash lights/ console  (replaced with new)

New seat cover  (replaced with new)

New tires

New cables for throttle, brake and clutch

New master cylinder

New switch gear for starter and kill switch at throttle side of handlebar

We have gone through this bike and cleaned it from top to bottom and performed the following services:

Installed new brake pads and rebuilt front caliper (with new brake fluid)

Repainted front brake calipers

Polished all chrome parts and accessories

Cleaned and tuned all 4 carburetors

Replaced all fluids

All lights and electrics work perfectly, and the horn work so it will easily pass Texas vehicle inspection. There is not a bit of grease or dirt on this bike anywhere as it was given a very thorough detailing, even in the places you can’t see.

1975 Honda CB400F R Side RearThis one has been repainted and looks to be in excellent physical and mechanical condition. The seller also includes a nice video of the bike being started and running.

These are great little bikes, and can still be found for very reasonable prices. They make excellent “starter classics” since they’re physically on the small side, are reliable, and have decent parts availability.

-tad

1975 Honda CB400F R Side Front

A Perfect Storm: 1975 Benelli Tornado 650S for Sale

1975 Benelli Tornado 650S R Front

Built between 1968 and 1976, the Benelli Tornado 650S could be thought of the “Anti-Triumph.” While the basic pushrod 650cc, parallel-twin specifications suggest a bike superficially similar, it is very different in practice. Apparently, the Benelli twin actually has four flywheels, but for most of us, a clue about the character can be found in the hugely oversquare dimensions: 84mm x 58mm. No balance shafts here, but the engine is very smooth and loves to rev, compared to contemporary British bikes.

1975 Benelli Tornado 650S R Rear

Amusingly, a bit of 70’s “anti-vibration” tech can be seen below: the long nubs on the footpeg rubber were designed to help isolate engine vibes that might be transmitted through the controls.

1975 Benelli Tornado 650S Engine

While drum brakes may not have been cutting-edge technology by 1975, the huge, chunky piece here should provide plenty of stopping power for anyone prepared to accept the limitations of vintage brakes.

1975 Benelli Tornado 650S Clocks

The original listing includes plenty of excellent, high quality photographs that show the bike in great detail. There are some minor blemishes and bits of corrosion, but overall, this bike is extremely clean, with only 60 miles.

1975 Benelli Tornado 650S L Front

From the original eBay listing: 1975 Benelli Tornado 650S for Sale

In extremely pristine condition this Benelli Tornado 650S is a perfect showpiece for Benelli’s unique Italian design and build quality. Indicated on the odometer, this Benelli has only registered 60 miles! Painted in its original a yellow and black color scheme this motorcycle looks amazing. The paint is original and in ideal condition, only very minor imperfections can be found; but are negligible for original 40 year-old motorcycle. Every chrome and stainless steel accessory is original and in very good condition, almost no aging can be found. A black banana seat allows the rider have a comfortable and relaxing experience, with a natural riding position. Under the seat the original red tool kit is still in place with every tool being accounted for. Original handlebars and Veglia gauges are in excellent condition, the handlebars still retain the factory hand grips too. Front and rear turn indicators work along with the original headlight and taillight too.

It should be noted that this motorcycle was never been titled. It will be sold on Bill of Sale, with the original manufacturer’s statement of origin (MSO) in hand.

1975 Benelli Tornado 650S Tank

$12,900 is obviously pretty big money for a Benelli Tornado. But, as was true for the Quattro that was featured here last week, that might seem like fair money to the right buyer. If you’re a collector and want the best, lowest-mileage example you can find, this has to be one of the most perfect and original Tornados in existence.

-tad

1975 Benelli Tornado 650S Front

Jack-Of-All-Trades: 1975 BMW R75/6 for Sale

1975 BMW R75 L Side

Bikes like BMW’s R75/6 represent a much more do-it-all imagining of the sportbike, before race-bred ergonomics and peaky powerplants made them impossibly focused and of far more limited utility than they are today. And although BMW’s have, until the S1000RR, reveled in a sort of “older gentleman’s express” image, they’ve always been able to get a wiggle on when asked, although it was often suggested that you phone ahead if you needed any significant braking done…

1975 BMW R75 L Side Cockpit

But it’s important to remember that part of BMW’s continued success was their early realization that the future of motorcycles was exactly in that upmarket trend away from practical transportation, and they adjusted their product to match that need. And then, instead of chasing every new styling and technological trend through the 70’s and 80’s, they became more than just motorcycles. They were BMW’s.

Introduced in 1974, the /6 models featured a front disc brake and an interesting master cylinder that was tucked under the tank to provide protection during a crash that was operated via a short cable. The 749cc engine was basically a bored-out version of the smaller bikes’ “airhead” flat twin units and gave 50hp with a top speed of 110mph.

1975 BMW R75 R Side Engine

From the original eBay listing: 1975 BMW R75/6 for Sale

The bike is in amazing condition but it is over 30 years old. I has a scratch on the tank. The tach needs to be replaced. Otherwise the bike is in great condition! But please ask any questions and I’m happy to answer in detail or get a picture. There are basic nicks that just occur with time but nothing major other. The ones on the tank are the most noticeable.

This has been my 2nd rider in Brooklyn for over 5 or 6 years.  It was rebuilt and purchase from AutoBahn Kraftwerks who are AMAZING at what they do.  The bike has been routinely maintained in Brooklyn by Peter at Moto Bogataro, I’ve owned a few airheads and he is the best mechanic I’ve ever worked with.  Love, care, passion and pure knowledge. 

It has been stored in my garage and never kept outdoors.  It starts on first click unless of course it’s really cold then it may take one or two extra.  

It needs a little bit of a wash, I will do it this weekend actually and have it detailed.  🙂  There is no rust AT ALL, that mud is just a puddle I ran over comes right off!!!  Will update photos if I can in time. 

The engine is super powerful, responsive, such a blast to drive, great weight balance, comfortable, and just a pleasure even two up. 

Most of the work was done by AutoBahn but I did update the rear shocks, have new tires, worked on brakes, maintained oil change schedule.  An s-fairing could be added to it, all hook up are on the bike. 

I am selling it because I no longer have my apartment with the parking space in 2 months and cannot afford to pay for an indoor lot for two bikes. 

 

1975 BMW R75 L Side Tank

I am familiar with Moto Bogataro, one of the shops he mentions in Brooklyn. They do have an excellent reputation and do lots of work on old Laverdas and Guzzis as well.

This particular bike doesn’t show all that well in the pictures, but the seller claims it just needs a bit of cosmetic TLC. I do believe him that it’s just mud spatters showing on the pipe and not rust, as the same material is obviously there on the seat as well. But the front tire is also looking pretty low and I’m not sure why you wouldn’t take a moment to correct those issues before photographing your bike for sale on eBay. With a Buy-It-Now price of $5,700 it’s not exactly cheap, but you’re looking at what appears to be a very solid example of an extremely classic sport motorcycle.

-tad

1975 BMW R75 Cockpit