Tagged: 1986

1986 Bimota DB1R for Sale

1986 Bimota DB1R R Rear

Originally founded to manufacture heating systems, Bimota turned its obviously wasted talent and enthusiasm to motorcycles in the 1970’s. During the 60’s and 70’s, major manufacturers were relatively hit-or-miss when it came to handling. This led to a number of small shops that specialized in frames to house powerplants from European and especially Japanese companies, who sometimes seemed content to stuff their powerful and reliable engines into bikes with the rigidity of a Schwinn bicycle.

Companies with names like Egli, Spondon, and Harris made everything from complete bikes, to frames, to kits you could buy and build your own specials. Bimota took the best ideas available and combined them to create their stunning SB2 in 1977, a bike so far ahead of its time it took the major manufacturers another twenty years to incorporate some of its more unusual features.

1986 Bimota DB1R Front and Rear

While Ducatis are only rarely criticized for their handling, some of Bimota’s most famous collaborations include the feisty twins from Bologna: we’re up to DB11 as of now, not including the innovative Tesi bikes, and this trend is likely to continue.

On that note, Bimota names can generally be decoded as follows: the first letter indicates the name of the manufacturer, the “B” is for “Bimota” and the number represents the bikes place in the history of Bimota’s working relationship with the manufacturer. So the “DB1” is really the “first Ducati-Bimota collaboration.”

1986 Bimota DB1R Right Front Wheel

DB1’s are pretty uncommon beasts although they were produced in relatively large numbers for a Bimota. But this particular example is very, very rare.

From the original eBay listing: 1986 Bimota DB1R for Sale

Bimota DB1R, 1 of 4 built, factory raced at Daytona by Malcolm Tunstall, new fluids, runs perfect, 

1986 Bimota DB1R Dash

A few years ago, I wrote up another one of these, meaning that two of the four in existence have featured on this site! It’s worth a quick look for the pictures of the bike with bodywork removed: the complex trellis frame looks like a Ducati by way of a Maserati Birdcage. And while the regular DB1 makes do with the regular Ducati clocks, the R has just one instrument: a honking big Veglia racing tach.

I really should just buy one of those already and mount it in a shadowbox or something…

Bidding is up over $26,000 which is no surprise, given the condition and rarity of this wonderful machine.

-tad

1986 Bimota DB1R Left Front

1986 Ducati TT1 Replica

1986 Ducati TT1 Track Bike R Front

Ducati’s 750F1 one of the first bikes produced after Cagiva’s takeover of the company and was based on their very light and successful TT1 and TT2 racebikes. Unfortunately, compromises made for mass production led to an ultimately disappointing road bike.

1986 Ducati TT1 Track Bike Dash

This is not a road bike, and it’s too well set-up to be parked in someone’s living room, so track-junkies only need apply. The guys at Loud Bike put up some very cool machines from time to time, and this is no exception. While the 750 F1 may not be the prettiest bike Ducati ever built, the devil is in the details in this case: the level of preparation and expertise that went into creating this makes this TT1 replica one of the most drool-worthy bikes I’ve ever seen.

1986 Ducati TT1 Track Bike L Rear

From the original eBay listing: 1986 Ducati TT1 Replica for Sale

With 88 rear wheel horsepower in a sub-300lb package, this example is arguably the quickest and best handling old-school 750cc TT1 in North America.  Ducati TT guru Lou Saif had this to say about the machine:  “The beauty of a real TT with the balls to back it up! Wish she were mine.”

I built this TT1 using many rare, authentic period components as a relatively faithful replica of the TT1s that ran in the AMA BOTT GP class back in the day.  The only deviation being the modern (90s) calipers and pumps, ignition coils and the non standard crankcase breather box in the seat.  However, it differs from most TT1 replicas in that it was built to be a fast and reliable track bike.  Over the years I’ve found that the only TT1 frame that seems to work well with modern 17” wheels & slicks is the final series Verlicchi large diameter, thin wall.  Back in the day, Reno Leoni had DM Frames make a copy of the Verlicchi and DM has since modified the jig to allow for the use of a big block motor.  The DM version as used on this machine was checked digitally in 2012 against the Verlicchi and they are geometrically identical, however the DM is 12mm longer between the upper cross brace and the steering head.  I countered this somewhat with the offset on my triple clamps, but the small difference in trail gives the DM a bit more stability with a very small decrease in agility. 

1986 Ducati TT1 Track Bike Engine

There’s plenty of additional information on eBay, as well as links. And check out this dyno run! That alone should sell you on this bike:

88hp may not sound like much but, even if the thing weren’t so light, Ducati’s v-twin will punch you out of corners on a wave of torque. I bet you’d embarrass plenty of modern bikes at track days on this, and sound much better doing it.

And look at that dry clutch!

1986 Ducati TT1 Track Bike Clutch

I’d love to build myself a dedicated track machine, and Ducatis are at the top of my list: older 916 and 748’s can be had for relatively cheap and there are tons of parts for them, although the good stuff is pricey. But if you want to get something a bit more classic, this might be your ticket, since all the heavy lifting has been done for you, and done very well. Not sure where bidding will go on this one, but I’d imagine no matter where it ends up, it’ll still be a deal since it’d cost a small fortune to replicate what’s on offer here.

-tad

1986 Ducati TT1 Track Bike L Side

1986 Moto Guzzi V65 Lario for Sale

1986 Moto Guzzi V65 R Front

This one’s on the edge of acceptably “classic”, but it’s an interesting bike and pretty rare.  It was also my riding buddy’s first bike: no Suzuki GS500E for him!  No, he had to have something Italian, a nice Moto Guzzi V65 Lario that I had to drive all the way to Washington DC to pick up for him…

1986 Moto Guzzi V65 L Rear

The V50 that preceded it was sweet-handling but underpowered.  A bump in displacement didn’t help much on its own and, to my knowledge, we didn’t get those in the US anyway.  The V65 Lario hoped to address this lack of performance with an update from two to four valves per cylinder.  Unfortunately, lubrication was not increased to handle the additional moving parts, and failures resulted.

Although these are very likely to have been fixed under warranty by now, you might want to pop the valve cover off one of the heads, just to be sure.  Black-finished cam followers will indicate the work has been performed.

1986 Moto Guzzi V65 Dash

The move to four valves had just the effect you’d expect: little change at low rpm, and better breathing as the revs piled on.  The bike could reach almost 115mph, not a bad figure for a 650cc twin.  Unfortunately, the 16″ wheels on Guzzi’s of this era were a bit of a fashion statement, as the frames were not really engineered with geometry to flatter this tire: handling was universally twitchy and the bikes had a tendency to stand up under braking, characteristics at odds with traditional Guzzi stability.

From the original, naturally all-capital eBay listing: 1986 Moto Guzzi V65 Lario for Sale

1986 MOTO GUZZI V65 LARIO, BIKE IS IN OVERALL NICE CONDITION, 21,131 MILES, THESE ARE RARE BIKES AND DON’T COME UP FOR AUCTION OFTEN. I PURCHASED THE BIKE FROM THE SECOND OWNER WHO HAD IT FOR THE LAST 22 YEARS,AND WAS ALWAYS DEALER MAINTAINED,, BIKE SAT FOR THE LAST 5 YEARS IN A HEATED WAREHOUSE, SINCE I PURCHASED THE BIKE I HAVE GONE THROUGH THE CARBS ,INSTALLED A NEW BATTERY,CLUTCH, FLYWHEEL AND STARTER, BIKE RUNS GOOD, SHIFTS GREAT , BRAKES ARE GOOD AND THE LIGHTS WORK,,,BIKE IS LIGHT AND NIMBLE AND IS A BLAST TO RIDE… MILEAGE WILL CONTINUE TO INCREASE AS I DO RIDE THIS BIKE..IT ALSO HAS DYNA COILS AND IGNITION,ACCEL 8.8 PLUG WIRES AND K&N AIR FILTERS, THERE ARE A FEW BUMPS AND BRUISES ON THE PAINT AND PAINT PEELED ON FRONT FENDER, BUT PRESENTS VERY WELL AND GETS LOTS OF COMPLIMENTS..THE CENTER STAND HAS A SMALL PIECE MISSING AS SEEN IN PICTURE, TIRES ARE ABOUT 75% NEUTRAL LIGHT IS NOT WORKING,INSIDE OF TANK HAS NO RUST, BUT THERE IS SOME RESIDUE FOM OLD FUEL,I INSTALLED INLINE FILTERS AND IT SEEM TO BE GETTING CLEANER EVERY TANK OF FUEL I RUN THROUGH IT..ALSO I WOULD RECOMMEND A NEW GAS CAP,,,PLEASE LOOK AT PICTURES CLOSELY AND ASK ANY QUESTIONS YOU MAY HAVE, THANKS AND GOOD LUCK BIDDING..

The seller has also helpfully posted a video of the bike running: 1986 Moto Guzzi V65 Lario Start Up and Walk Around

The V65 Lario came fairly late in the production-cycle of these smaller twins.  Despite a familial style and configuration, they shared few parts with their bigger brethren, so be careful assuming parts availability will rival the larger Guzzis.  But take idiosyncratic handling into account and ride your sweet little Guzzi on a Sunday afternoon.  Be happy your friend didn’t lose the really cool key these Guzzi’s came with.  Watch the revs build on that gorgeous, white-faced Veglia tachometer and smile.  You certainly won’t see yourself around every corner, and the styling of these 80’s machines is finally starting to be appreciated.

-tad

1986 Moto Guzzi V65 L Side

1986 Bimota DB1R for Sale

This is a seriously exotic piece of kit.  For those of you unfamiliar with Bimota: they’re a boutique manufacturer of very exotic motorcycles.  Founded in 1966 [to manufacture heating systems, not bikes], the name comes from the first couple letters of the founders’ names: Bianchi, Morri, Tamburini.  Yes, that Tamburini, of Ducati 916 and MV Agusta F4 fame.

And that Bianchi, if you’re into bicycles.

Bimota got their start making motorcycles in the 1970’s, taking the powerful and reliable engines from evil-handling, flexible Japanese bikes then stuffing them into light, rigid frames and wrapping them in wild, modern bodywork.  The DB1 was the first bike produced by Bimota to be powered by the V-Twin Ducati motor.  Ducati has rarely had a problem with handling, but the Bimota name made an already rare and exotic name even more so, and the partnership has been a success for the small firm, spawning “DB” bikes up through the DB8 and the Tesi series of hub-centered bikes.

There’s not much information in the ad, but I’d assume the seller expects you to know all about how rare and wonderful these are: 1986 Bimota DB1R for Sale

In 1986 Bimota sent (4) DB1R – Factory Race Bikes to the United States.

Davide Tardozzi, Malcolm Tunstall and Dale Quarterley each campaigned a DB1R (The 4th is known to have purchased by a privateer and destroyed by fire during an on-track accident).  This is Dale Quarterley’s bike and from the exterior can be noted by the custom Supertrapp exhaust made to lower the foot pegs for his 6′ – 4″ height.

Built and supported by Ferracci in Pennsylvania throughout the 1986 season, the motor was developed with many tricks including increased displacement and compression.  Delivered with Ducati’s 750cc Montjuich motor, already it was a hot and powerful motor.  This bike also has magnesium Bimota labeled mechanical clutch, valve covers, and Bimota stamped wheels. The bodywork is all fiberglass and the gas tank is in the removable upper body panel and of course never had ethanol within in it.

If you look, you can even see a little “Fast by Ferracci” badge on the close up of the engine by the cam belts.

A general guide to decoding the alpha-numeric Bimota naming system: the first letter indicates the engine manufacturer, the second is “B” for “Bimota”, and the number indicates how many bikes they’ve built using that manufacturer’s powerplant.

So a SB8 is the eighth Bimota to be powered by a Suzuki motor, and YB11 is the 11th Bimota to be powered by a Yamaha engine, and so on.

This bike has been up for sale recently, back in July.  It looks like it found no takers then, and at the current Buy It Now price, may not find any this time either.  Hopefully it will find a new home this time around.

-tad