Tagged: 250

Yetman-Framed 1963 Honda 250 Racebike for Sale

1963 Honda 250 Race Bike R Front

I’d like to be able to tell you what we really have here, but the listing simply says it’s a 250 Honda Road Racer. Factory Honda 250cc racers of the period were generally sophisticated four-cylinder or even six-cylinder machines, although there was the CR72, a parallel-twin race bike. So is this a full-on racer, or a converted street bike? without a shot of the bike sans fairing, it’s hard to tell and I’d be happy to have any experts weigh in the comments. The frame won’t give you much hint: it’s not the original and is claimed to have been built by Yetman.

1963 Honda 250 Race Bike L Rear

Dave Yetman was an innovative, seat-of-the-pants motorcycle enthusiast who, after crashing his CB77, found it was more economical to build a replacement frame for it, using welding skills he learned working on Formula Vee cars. At the time most motorcycles used cradle frames, whereas Yetman used thin-tube, “trellis-style” frames that used the engine as a stressed member. His frames were almost impossibly light: the resulting CB77 frame was only eight pounds, compared to the original’s 30!

1963 Honda 250 Race Bike R Tank

In business making frames throughout the 1960’s for roadracing, off-road, and drag racing applications, Yetman was like an American version of Rickman or Nico Bakker, creating bikes that were lighter, faster, and better-handling than what you could generally get from the factory.

1963 Honda 250 Race Bike Fairing

From the original eBay listing: 1963 Honda 250 Road Racer for Sale

Motoexotica is pleased to present this extremely rare and beautifully preserved 1963 Honda road racing motorcycle which features a 250cc four stroke twin cylinder engine and a Yetman racing frame. Bike is also equipped with 5 speed transmission, 26mm Mikuni carburetors, twin leading shoe front brakes, magnesium triple trees, full safety wiring, and more.

As part of a collection, this bike has been a static display piece for several years and has not been started or run recently. Overall condition is excellent with some patina on original parts but no broken or damaged pieces and parts that we are aware of. This bike is a fantastic piece of motorcycle racing history and is sure to start conversations wherever it sits.

It’s a shame that this bike is currently a display item, but I’d expect it should be possible to get it into running order without too much difficulty. Bidding is up to $3,700 with the Reserve Not Met and a couple days left on the auction. Perhaps if the seller included a bit more history, it’d get the bidders’ juices flowing…

-tad

1963 Honda 250 Race Bike L Side

 

Little Hog: 1967 Harley Davidson Aermacchi 250 Sprint

1967 Harley Davidson Sprint 250 L Front

I normally don’t post too many Harleys on the site, simply because not many fit within our mission statement, aside from the odd XRTT that shows up for sale. But this little 250 Sprint looks very nice and fits the bill.

1967 Harley Davidson Sprint 250 R Side Rear

When Harley decided they needed a range of smaller displacement bikes to supplement their existing models, it made sense to go to an outside company, rather than try to reinvent the wheel and, by the early 1960’s, they owned a stake in Aermacchi, an Italian builder of small-displacement motorcycles. In the end, the relationship did not work out, as Harley fans never really embraced the little Italian singles: shades of their relationship with MV Agusta. Harley had the savvy to buy a really interesting asset, but lacked the vision to make the relationship work.

1967 Harley Davidson Sprint 250 Cockpit

The Harley Davidson-branded Aermacchi was powered by a 246cc OHV single that produced just 21hp and could push the little bike to a top speed of 76mph. Wet weight was just 270lbs, with good brakes and excellent handling. This was obviously a bit of a joke to the lumbering, muscular behemoths favored by Harley, but many can still be found circling racetracks at vintage events.

1967 Harley Davidson Sprint 250 Engine Detail

From the original eBay listing: 1967 Harley Davidson Aermacchi 250 Sprint TV replica for Sale

All the sheet metal is straight and dent free from a European only TV model found in Italy and mounted on a stock US model 67 H with a few changes outlined here.. The front fork is pre 67 to mount the very rare Ala Verde Road race style front fender.  The handlebars use the early solid mount triple clamp instead of the wobbly rubber mount and the handlebar is the 61/63 low rise European spec bar with attached lever perch’s. Handlebar clamps are first year super rare 61 sprint only aluminum cast and polished type. Exhaust header and muffler are NOS and Saddle is perfect with no defects. Chrome is very nice with some oxidation spots on rear rim and handlebar.

Rims are original Radaelli with painted spokes in very nice shape with vintage Pirelli tires, rideable but not suggested for spirited cornering. Front brake is more powerful later double actuated type. All wiring is stock and unmodified and all electrical is functional. Paint on tank is scratched here and there as it is I believe original as found used from Italy with factory paint . The rest of the paint is matched but the tank is more orange. Toolbox’s are perfect with no battery box rot. Battery is NOS Safa just activated. Overall looks great. The frame paint is very nice factory original. Bike starts on one or two kicks and shifts and stops perfectly. On startup after sitting some time you will likely see a puff of smoke and this is common with the horizontal cylinder configuration and clears up right away. Motor is unmodified. Carburetor filter assembly will tuck vertically into tank pocket but I believe it breaths better and looks cooler as seen. Also includes very rare center stand and retains the original side stand as well.

1967 Harley Davidson Sprint 250 Rear Suspension

In Italy, bikes in this class were built as durable transportation, but here in the US they were used as beaters or starter bikes and often discarded. They’re worth resurrecting: like old air-cooled VW’s, Aermacchis are durable and infinitely rebuildable, but require regular maintenance. Mechanically simple and honest, easy to work on, they make ideal starter classics. With a Buy It Now price of almost $6,000, this is a pricey example, but would make a great introduction to vintage biking for a young person or someone of smaller stature.

-tad

1967 Harley Davidson Sprint 250 R Side

Rebuilt Vintage Roadracer: 1968 Motobi 250 Sei Tiranti for Sale

1968 Motobi 250 6 Tiranti L Side Front

This Motobi Sei Tiranti is new to me, so I did a bit of digging. It was a race bike based on the “Sprite” and built by Primo Zanzani, a roadracer and self-taught motorcycle tuner who came onboard Motobi to develop the four-cylinder 250GP bike and later race bikes based on the egg-shaped Motobi single, helping them earn the 250cc Junior title in 1966, 1967, and 1969.

1968 Motobi 250 6 Tiranti L Side Detail

“Sei Tiranti” refers to the six head studs on the later model homologation bikes that provided additional strength versus the street Motobi’s four head studs that allowed for higher compression and more revs as they chased after more power.

1968 Motobi 250 6 Tiranti Front Wheel

The race bikes were pretty far from the street bikes in every way allowed by the rules in this class. The bikes often bore only a superficial resemblance to the street bikes on which they were supposedly based and included sand-cast cases along with many other trick parts. The bike weighs in at just 223lbs dry, making for pretty good performance when combined with the 33hp and 5-speed box.

1968 Motobi 250 6 Tiranti L Side Rear

Motobi was originally known as Moto “B” Pesaro for founder Giuseppe Benelli and their home province of Pesaro, the name later was shortened to Motobi. After an early disagreement with his brothers, Giuseppe went his own way, making small-displacement motorcycles until he was brought back into the fold in 1962 when the larger Benelli company acquired him, possibly making for awkward family dinners thereafter…

From the original eBay listing: 1968 Motobi 250 Sei Tiranti for Sale

Have a look first at this video of the history of Mr. Primo Zanzani…..his bikes won over 500 races in the 50s and 60s. This racing motorbike, belonging to the history of the racing motorbikes, has been hand built fully by him in person. Fully original in any single parts. Very very rare bike. last one has been sold in Japan for 95.000 euro. Immensive collectionist value.
Visible in our museum in Fano.

Recently restored and fully rebuilt by Mr. Zanzani, still alive and living in Pesaro.

The original listing is found on eBay.co.uk, but the bike is currently in Fano, a province of Pesaro, very near where it was born. Interestingly, this should be a very authentic rebuild, since Primo Zanzani is still very much alive and running his family business, as well as producing race replicas that appear to be accurate in every detail.

1968 Motobi 250 6 Tiranti L Side Fairing

The classified listing states the price as £30,000 which as of today equates to about $47,000, which is some serious change for a motorcycle of any sort, although the seller helpfully cites that previous examples have sold for even more.

I’m very new to Motobi, so if any of our readers can enlighten me further, I’m happy to hear from you!

-tad

1968 Motobi 250 6 Tiranti L Side

Honorably Discharged: Ex-Military1955 Moto Guzzi Airone for Sale

1955 Moto Guzzi Airone L Side

For collectors and modern motorcyclists, the phrase “Italian motorcycle” conjures up images of sleek, exotic, motorcycles with shrieking engines and fragile beauty. But in the aftermath of World War II, there was a real need for cheap, reliable commuter motorcycles and Moto Guzzi, like many other manufacturers of the period, were there to provide practical transportation with the inevitable dash of Italian flair.

1955 Moto Guzzi Airone Engine

Moto Guzzis of the period were often named after birds, and the Airone or “Heron” makes for a great vintage ride today, with reliability and a broad spread of power from the 250cc four-stroke single that was surprisingly smooth, owing to the significant mass of the striking externally-mounted flywheel. Introduced in 1939 and produced until 1957, it’s also an incredibly long-lived model.

1955 Moto Guzzi Airone Bars

Famous for their reliability, many Guzzis were also used in police and military applications, and this particular bike appears to be one such machine.

From the original eBay listing: 1955 Moto Guzzi Airone for Sale

Very rare and well sorted 1955 Moto Guzzi Airone military model. This is a wonderful 250cc 4-stroke single-cylinder classic Italian motorcycle. It starts easily, idles well and runs strong.

This particular machine is totally stock, original and correct (including the military items – leg guards, luggage rack and more – which I have taken off but will go with the motorcycle to a new owner) other than the Mikuni carb and pod air filter, new battery, and replacement tires.

A few years ago, after a long search for an Airone, I purchased this machine out of long term storage. I spent time and money going through it mechanically – while leaving as much of the original cosmetics as possible – to get it to run well. I replaced the broken Dellorto carb with a new properly jetted Mikuni and sorted out the electrics and charging system. 

It is possible this is only Moto Guzzi military Airone in America – making it an unusual machine for collector or rider.

I replaced the badly damaged muffler with a correct one that looks right on this bike, installed a new clutch throwout bearing, a new battery and rewired the magneto kill switch to a small button on the handlebars. I added an in-line oil shut off valve to eliminate the notorious sumping issue. 

I unbolted the unnecessary military parts from the motorcycle to lesser the weight so I could compete with it in the Moto Giro USA, where it was a strong competitor. 

This classic Italian sport/touring machine features Clubman handlebars and Tomasselli-style levers (front brake and clutch) matched tool boxes and a handy center stand. Good usable tires with little wear, good battery, good charging system, light work, horn works, suspension works. 

1955 Moto Guzzi Airone Rear Suspension

Although these were relatively popular in Europe, very few made their way to the US, likely owing to the American proclivity for big-displacement vehicles suitable for crossing wide-open spaces. Ex-military machines can be a bit of a gamble, often having led hard lives. But Guzzi’s rugged construction is a definite asset here, and I really like the matte green paint and practical look of this bike.

-tad

1955 Moto Guzzi Airone R Side

Budget Italian Racer: 1982 Moto Morini 250

1982 Moto Morini 250 Race Bike L Side

Another unusual racebike up for sale this week, this time a very funky Moto Morini 250 with an enormous, wind-blocking fairing. I’m not sure if this would increase or decrease the bike’s top speed, but it should make it easy to relax on long straights, tucked into the bubble of still air behind it. You could maybe read a magazine…

1982 Moto Morini 250 Race Bike Dash

With no real modern presence, at least in the US, Moto Morini is still the forgotten Italian marque, although they survived well into the 1980’s in Europe. Part of the reason for their relative obscurity here is their insistence on small-displacement bikes: they never got bigger than 500 until they were resurrected in 2004.

1982 Moto Morini 250 Race Bike Front Drum

But Morini, in spite of modest top speed performance, always built sophisticated bikes with impressive handling. The 72º v-twin was designed to be compact and smooth, and put power though a six-speed gearbox. This innovative engine utilized traditional pushrods to operate the valves, but used a toothed belt to drive the camshaft instead of a heavy, noisy chain and the engines famously featured Heron-style heads that gave excellent fuel economy and simplified manufacturing.

1982 Moto Morini 250 Race Bike R Engine

From the original eBay listing: 1982 Moto Morini 250 race bike for Sale

Dunstall tank, Grimeca hub, Akront front rim, Takasago rear rim, Paioli forks, Adj Progressive shocks
Fitted with Moto Morini 3½ top end.
Reportedly raced at
Sears Point in the early 80’s, and clearly set up for racing, with wired nuts and bolts, and engine breathers connected to overflow bottles. No battery, lighting, or brake lights, etc, (Bike runs without battery)
Appears to have been in good shape when stored with gas removed from tank and carbs. Engine sounded good upon start up (see video below from last summer) After this run it was drained of fuel and back into storage
Bike will need work to make it roadworthy, tank sealing, paint, tires, mechanical work, tuning etc.
This bike is not a show bike. It was set up purely for functionality, not looks.
I’m not an expert in this field so use your own judgment and research before bidding.
Clear title in my name (secured by bond)
Mileage listed for ref only, actual miles not known
Stand not included in sale
Bike must be picked up within 30 days

1982 Moto Morini 250 Race Bike Rear Hub

While this is very cool, it is obviously modified from stock, with heads from a 3½ [350cc] bike, so be careful to read the rules of whatever race series you plan to enter this in. Conveniently Morinis came with both electric and kick start, so this bike simply ditches the heavy, unreliable electric system and goes with the lighter kick that eliminates the need for a battery.

-tad

1982 Moto Morini 250 Race Bike R Front

Supercharged 1938 Moto Guzzi PE250 Stanley Woods Replica

1938 Moto Guzzi PE250 L Rear

Now this is a race-replica! No mere paint, decal, and clip-on conversion here, the seller has put some serious money into a vintage machine, fitting a supercharger to an early horizontal-single Moto Guzzi PE250. Most of the early Guzzi’s I’ve seen for sale have plenty of vintage patina, but this one looks better than factory fresh, with some hot-rod touches I’ve never seen applied to a vintage Guzzi.

1938 Moto Guzzi PE250 L Side Front

Although current owners over at Piaggio have cast Moto Guzzi as their line of retro-riffic cruisers and neoclassic sporty machines that appeal to born-again-bikers and riders “of a certain age,” it’s important to remember their rich racing history, and this bike harkens back to that era, when Guzzi’s raced on the world stage and won.

1938 Moto Guzzi PE250 Dash

Prior to the introduction of their iconic v-twin in the 1960’s, Guzzi’s successes were based around variations on their “horizontal single” theme. Singles were ubiquitous during the period, when simplicity equaled reliability and light weight in the motorcycling world. Guzzi laid their engine over on its side to keep the center of gravity as low as possible and stick the cylinder head out into the cooling breeze, although I do wonder about their insistence on exposed valvesprings with the head so vulnerable to debris and road grit… Their distinctive exposed flywheel was a better idea, and allowed them to keep the weight of the engine low, since the cases didn’t need to actually enclose the spinning mass of flywheel itself.

1938 Moto Guzzi PE250 R Engine2

This configuration worked well on both road and track: the same simplicity that meant reliable, torquey race bikes made for durable, long-legged and easy-to-ride transportation during an era when ordinary people were just getting used to the idea of personal mobility. And later, the configuration meant for reliable transportation for a country reeling from the devastation of war.

1938 Moto Guzzi PE250 L Side Front

From the original eBay listing: Supercharged 1938 Moto Guzzi PE250 Stanley Woods Replica

This is a replica of Stanley Woods 1938 Moto Guzzi 250 Supercharged.

We fired it up 4 months ago and it had a problem with being too large for the Supercharger. I gave up at that point and fitted the stock setup without the supercharger. I have all the parts for the Supercharger if you wish to fit it again. 

Much work has gone into the engine for use with the Supercharger. Feel free to call me and I can better detail these for you. ph.360-387-5038.

I have over $30K invested in the bike. Some special features are: alloy fuel and oil tank, front and rear fender alloy, alloy wheels, alloy brake and shift assy, Special light weight suspension springs and alloy bellypan for them and custom leather seat and pillion. Much more…

1938 Moto Guzzi PE250 SuperCharger

There is still plenty of time left on the listing, and the Buy It Now is set at $26,000. The seller mentions that there were some teething problems with the blower and it’s currently not fitted to the bike. Never thought I’d actually be typing “blower,” writing for this site… I’m not sure what “a problem with being too large for the supercharger” means exactly or what running problems that issue caused. But it sounds like it was built with supercharging in mind, so if I had the money to buy this bike, I’d definitely be sorting that out!

A vintage 250 single with a supercharger? Sign me up!

-tad

1938 Moto Guzzi PE250 R Front

Jewel-Like Racer: 1964 Ducati 250 F3 Race Bike for Sale

1964 Ducati 250 Race Bike R Side Low

Small bikes are big business these days, especially when the words “Ducati” and “race bike” are involved, and this little Ducati 250 F3 might be at the top of the heap. While Ducati’s improbable victory at Imola cemented their big v-twin in everyone’s mind as the bike to have and gave them credibility in the eyes of the American market with their insatiable hunger for moar powah, much of their racing and street history is built around bikes like this single cylinder machine.

1964 Ducati 250 Race Bike Dash

In fact, the first bike to feature their signature spring-less Desmo system was a single cylinder bike. Which makes sense, since the primary advantage of the system would have been most pronounced in the 1950’s, during the era when “hairpin” valve springs were still prevalent in motorcycle engines and metallurgy of the time reduced spring performance at the screaming revs that gave race winning power on track.

1964 Ducati 250 Race Bike R Side Engine

These days, single-cylinder racing is generally a budget endeavor, a stepping-stone for newer racers to show their stuff on a relatively level playing field that allows their skill and ruthlessness to shine. But racing singles from this era are anything but budget, regardless of the spec sheet: the racing 250 shared virtually no parts with the street version. Bikes like the F3 had their own frames, engines, suspensions, and brakes with basically no parts interchangeability with roadgoing models.

1964 Ducati 250 Race Bike R Side Tank Detail

From the original eBay listing: 1964 Ducati 250cc F3 Corsa for Sale

I AM INTERESTED IN TRADING OFF THIS DUCATI FOR A 1972 OR LATER HARLEY DAVIDSON  XR750TT OR OTHER INTERESTING RACE OR CLASSIC MOTORCYCLE OR VINTAGE FORMULA CAR!

Very rare one of only a few true F3 250cc that Ducati produced. Professionally restored and documented by Altinier Motorsports Treviso Italy. This is a beautiful motorcycle that would make an excellent addition to any garage or collection.

Well known sportbike manufacturer Ducati has always been deeply immersed in motorcycle roadracing, and its premier engineer, Fabio Taglioni, was a talented designer of fast motorcycles. In the 1950’s, Ing. Taglioni developed an overhead cam lightweight with desmodromic valves that became the bike to beat in international lightweight racing. Later versions of this bike came with double overhead cams. Many of the world’s top rider rode a Ducati lightweight at some point in their careers.
Walter Villa was one of the most famous GP racers of the Sixties and Seventies. Winning four GP titles in the 250 and 350 classes in 1974, 1975 and 1976. It is believed that this 250 is his personal mount, based on an inspection by his brother. Both the engine and frame have significant differences from other motorcycles built by Ducati.

NOTE: THIS IS NOT A BUILT UP 175cc!!

Located in Southern California.

NOTE! This motorcycle is selling on a BILL OF SALE ONLY! There are no titles on factory race motorcycles!

These are extremely rare, with very few 250’s being built. According to a previous auction of this bike through Bonhams, there may have been as few as five or six ever built. There are so many cool details on Ducatis of this period: that little cut out in the bottom of the tank for the carburetor bellmouth and the little clips that hold on what I suspect is an inspection cover on the left-hand side of the engine case. Any owners want to chime in and tell me what’s hiding behind that?

1964 Ducati 250 Race Bike Carb

While it’s still possible to find sporty Ducati singles on a reasonable budget if you’re looking to participate in events like the Moto Giro, this probably isn’t one you’d consider: a previous auction of this very bike in 2012 netted $81,000… With plenty of time left on the auction and bidding only up to around $12,000 I’d expect we have a long way to go yet!

-tad

1964 Ducati 250 Race Bike L Side

1967 Ducati Mark 3 Vintage Racer

1967 Ducati 250 Mark 3 Race Bike L Side

With all the laurels they’ve earned for wins on track and ink expended, or keys keyed, to express the love for the raucous bark of their v-twin motorcycles, it’s easy to forget that Ducati, like most manufacturers, got their start making single-cylinder motorcycles.

1967 Ducati 250 Mark 3 Race Bike R Side Front

For much of the motorcycle’s history, they were practical, inexpensive transportation first, racing machines a distant second, and you can’t get much more simple and reliable than the good ol’ single-cylinder. “Thumpers” are simple to design and manufacture, have fewer moving parts to break or need adjustment, and can be made in a huge range of displacements. In addition, their torquey power delivery and strong, friendly character make them excellent tools for the street.

1967 Ducati 250 Mark 3 Race Bike Dash

A small manufacturer couldn’t hope to compete in terms of sophistication with industrial giants like Honda, so Ducati stayed with forms of racing that played to their considerable strengths. While the Ducati Mark 3 may have been only a 250cc machine, the Diana Super Sport was the fastest 250 on the market at the time and could top “the ton” with relative ease. It did not feature Ducati’s now ubiquitous Desmo positive valve operation and used traditional springs, but it was a thoroughbred in every other way.

1967 Ducati 250 Mark 3 Race Bike L Engine

This example has been fully prepped for the track and includes a metal belly pan, unusual dry clutch, and a four leading-shoe front drum brake from a period Suzuki for some improved stop to go with the engine’s uprated poke.

From the original eBay listing: 1967 Ducati Mark 3 250cc Vintage Racing Motorcycle

1967 Ducati A.H.R.M.A. legal in 250 GP and eligible to bump up to 350 GP class.
This bike has been developed over the past twenty years and last raced in 2013.
The frame is Ducati with custom fork crowns and Ceriani forks.
Rear shock mounts by the owner with Progressive Suspension Shocks.
The front brake is Suzuki 4LS and the rear brake is stock Ducati.
The engine uses a Euro Red crank, Arais piston, Megacycle cam, and Ducati rockers with light weight valves.
The dry clutch is from Italy. The crank has been balanced to minimize vibration.
The bike uses a total loss ignition with points and coil. It has a Scitsu tachometer.
Spares include sprockets, cables, pegs, shifter, levers, battery, and jets.

With just a single bid for $5,999 and the reserve not yet met, it’s unfortunate this bike hasn’t found a buyer yet, with three days to go. It seems like a great turnkey way to get into the vintage racing scene, something I’d really love to do myself.

1967 Ducati 250 Mark 3 Race Bike L Grip

There’ve been a number of really neat vintage racing machines up for sale recently on eBay, track bikes and race-eligible machinery that looks well-prepared and ready to go. These seem like they’d be a good bet for a buyer: obviously used harder than many pampered street machines, the upside is that they’re owned by gearheads and racing requires certain minimum safety and therefore maintenance standards be met. If you’re trusting your life to something you’re going to be pushing to the limit, your standards for just what constitutes “safe” do tend to go up a bit…

1967 Ducati 250 Mark 3 Race Bike R Rear

In addition, my personal experience with bikes and cars is that, the more you use them, the better they work. Sitting collecting dust in a garage or showroom is bad for bikes: tires and hoses dry out and crack, gaskets weep, parts seize and rust…

-tad

1967 Ducati 250 Mark 3 Race Bike R Side

 

Vintage Racer:1960 Moto Parilla 250 for Sale

1960 Moto Parilla 250 L Front

From one of our readers comes this very nice racebike, a 1960 Parilla 250 that’s also posted up on Orange County’s Craigslist. There isn’t much information in the listing, but there are some good photos that should give a good idea of what you’re in for.

I’m not a Parilla expert, but this looks like this one’s powered by their “high-cam” 250 that made approximately 26hp and was built for the US. Most countries settled for 175 or 200cc models, but here in the land of “bigger-is-better”, we got an extra large 250cc helping, which came with a side of fries and a large soda.

1960 Moto Parilla 250 R Front

Although it looks like an overhead-cam engine at a glance, it’s not: the chain-driven cam operates the valves via short pushrods you can see on the left side of the engine, where they’re protected by corrugated rubber boots. This configuration allowed the little pushrod motor to rev pretty high and made maintenance easier, since the head could be removed without disturbing the ignition timing.

1960 Moto Parilla 250 L High

Giovanni Parrilla [yes, there is a second “r” in his name] reportedly started the company on a bet, sitting around with his pals complaining about the current state of the Italian racing machinery, “Oh, so you think you could do better?” And he did. After studying the Norton Manx, he built his own single in 1946 and was very successful in racing until Japanese two-strokes dominated the class in the 1960’s, although the company sold bikes in the US as late as 1967.

1960 Moto Parilla 250 L Side

These are pretty rare in the US, and are very collectible. This one appears to be in excellent shape and it looks like a runner, but a bit of history would be helpful. Parts can be scarce for these, but the community surrounding Parilla is close-knit and should be able to help.

-tad

1960 Moto Parilla 250 R Rear

 

1956 Moto Guzzi Airone Sport for Sale

1956 Moto Guzzi Airone Sport R Side

There’s been a spate of very cool vintage Guzzis up on eBay recently. Most of these bikes were built as stylish, but dependable commuters, which makes them great as vintage rides, since they’re far less temperamental than might be expected from a classic Italian sportbike. They’re not highly-strung racing machines, although they are sporty and reward the rider with easily accessible performance.

1956 Moto Guzzi Airone Sport L Side Front

Moto Guzzi’s Airone [“Heron”] was first introduced in 1939, but the Second World War interrupted production as Guzzi turned its attention to wartime manufacturing. Production of the Airone resumed after the war ended and the bike, with various improvements, was built until 1957!

In all forms, the 250cc engine was durable, refined, and smooth. Guzzi’s signature external “meat-slicer” flywheel allowed for proper rotational mass to provide that signature effortless torque and smoothness at all revs, but kept engine cases compact.

1956 Moto Guzzi Airone Sport L Side Engine

The Sport version for sale here was first available in 1949 and had what, at first, might appear to be only minor improvements in performance: 13hp versus 9.5hp and a 59mph top speed versus 73mph. But the Sport offers almost 35% increase in horsepower and a nearly 24% increase in top speed over the standard model!

1956 Moto Guzzi Airone Sport Dash

From the original eBay listing: 1956 Moto Guzzi Airone for Sale

This is a very nice example of a Guzzi  Airone Sport 250. The “Sport” version has considerably better performance than the more common “Turismo” model. It comes with aluminum rims, a lower handlebar, a forward facing foot brake and has the foot-pegs further back.  The higher compression engine gives this cool bike fairly brisk performance.
250cc. Overhead valve 4 stroke. 4 speed. Good running and riding condition.
Older restoration still in very presentable condition with a few minor cosmetic flaws. New battery but runs on a magneto.
The fairly rare optional speedometer was added at a later date and reads 5513 kms  but this is not the original mileage.
Clear California title in my name. Also comes with the original June 1956 Italian title showing ownership history for historical purposes.
You are welcome to visit in Tarzana (San Fernando Valley part of Los Angeles).

1956 Moto Guzzi Airone Sport R Side Engine

The Airone epitomizes Guzzis of this era, with a reputation for economy, reliability, and style with deceptive performance: the limits may not be especially high, but you can use all of the performance all of the time. This example is from near the very end of the Airone’s long production cycle and features a classic style with the expected refinement of a bike in production for nearly 20 years.

-tad

1956 Moto Guzzi Airone Sport L Side