Tagged: 3CL

Green Machine: 1977 Laverda Jarama for Sale

1977 Laverda Jarama R Front

Built by Slater Laverda in the UK, masterminds behind the original Jota, the Formula Mirage was powered by Laverda’s famously charismatic and durable three-cylinder engine. It featured a distinctive, one-piece fiberglass tank and seat unit that looked sleek, but significantly limited fuel capacity, which in turn reduced the range of the already thirsty triple. Several folks online also commented on the steeply-sloped seat unit that sees passengers steadily sliding forward into the rider. A bonus on a hot date, not so great if you’re give your buddy a lift to pick up his bike from the mechanic…

1977 Laverda Jarama L Rear

I generally prefer my Laverdas to be bright orange but, if I were in the market for one right now, I’d still have to give serious consideration to this very green Jarama. I always thought the Jarama was a European-only model, what with it being named after a Spanish race circuit that 99% of Americans have probably never heard of. But it turns out this was, in typical Laverda style, a US-only version of their 3CL. Certainly “Jarama” is a far sexier name than “3CL” but it’d probably help to have chosen “Sebring” or “Daytona” or even “Laguna” for an American model…

1977 Laverda Jarama Clocks

Powered by Laverda’s classic inline triple that displaced 981cc and featured the earlier, burlier 180° crank that had the outside pistons rising and falling together, the three-cylinder Laverdas are pretty imposing beasts. This unusual engine apparently produced more power than a traditional 120° crankshaft configuration, although it also produced far more vibration.

1977 Laverda Jarama Carb

The resulting sound and feel of the “four with a miss” engine are considered by fans to be superior to the later versions although, having heard both bikes in person, the 120° crank bikes are still pretty far from your average Speed Triple…

1977 Laverda Jarama R Engine

From the original eBay listing: 1977 Laverda Jarama for Sale

This is an all original 1977 Laverda Jarama 1000 with only 8105 miles in original factory green. The bike recently received a restoration. The frame was sandblasted and painted gloss black. The chainguard was sent to the chromer for replating along with the headlight brackets, exhaust downpipes (headers), Brevetato Jota bars, Ciriani rear shock springs, foot peg brackets and other misc parts, nut and bolts.  My plater refused to do the mufflers but they are in great shape anyways. They have some small rust spots here and there but no dents or road rash.  The carbs were completely rebuilt and received vapor blasting and an ultrasonic bath. Carbs also got new seals and misc parts were replaced. As you can see in the pictures all the aluminum covers were polished. Front forks were rebuilt and got new seals.  The brake calipers and disc carriers were re-anodized in black.  Calipers then received new pistons and seals and so did the front and rear master cylinders.  All the nuts, bolts and washers were also cad and zinc plated plated. The bike runs amazingly well and is a blast to ride. and looks beautiful too. Not many Jarama’s in the US.  

Now the not so bad: I wanted to preserve the original paint so I left it as is. There are two small dents on the tank. One is on the right side and the other is on the left top edge. The left side cover is also cracked and so is the rear tail piece.  
1977 Laverda Jarama R Rear
Unlike most Laverdas of the period, the Jarama featured a left side gearshift and other minor changes to appeal to buyers in the American market, although it ultimately didn’t help sales much and the bike is very rare. In many ways, it’s like a Jota “appearance package” except that the base 3CL is still a pretty high-performance motorcycle and probably a better ride for most people than the high-compression, highly-strung Jota.

Bidding is active with plenty of time left on the auction. In very sharp condition and with such low miles, this looks like a great opportunity for someone who wants a classic Laverda, but can’t quite stretch to a Jota.

-tad

1977 Laverda Jarama L Front

A Deeper Shade of Orange: 1977 Laverda Jota for Sale

1977 Laverda Jota R Side

I’m not generally a purist when it comes to colors: I actually prefer my Ferraris in subtle hues like greys and earthy metallics. I’m not a huge fan of British Racing Green. And silver is a great color for daily-driver Mercedes, it’s a bit bland if you’re spending over $100,000 on a car or bike. But when it comes to Laverda, there’s only one color for me: orange. That’s not to say bikes like this Laverda Jota don’t look amazing in red, or silver, or green. It’s just that, if you have a good excuse to own a bike slathered in screaming tangerine paint, it seems like you should fully take advantage.

1977 Laverda Jota L Side Detail

The original Jota is a bit of a hot-rod, built up by Slater Laverda, a dealer and tuning shop based out of the UK. Laverda’s 981cc triple in the 3CL was clearly understressed, and Slater saw the performance potential just waiting to be unleashed. They took the basic, rugged package and upgraded it with high-compression pistons, higher-lift camshafts, and a free-flowing exhaust.

1977 Laverda Jota R Tank

The modifications resulted in 90hp and a top speed of 146mph. For a time, it was the fastest bike in the land. And even after it was superseded by faster machines, it was still the manliest bike in the land: early machines used a 180° camshaft that had the outside pistons rising and falling at the same time, which made for wild power and a raw feel that has been likened to an inline four with a miss… Controls were heavy, seat height tall, and they were generally unruly, but characterful beasts.

1977 Laverda Jota Clocks

From the original eBay listing: 1977 Laverda Jota for Sale

This Laverda Jota was built in July 1977. This particular bike was originally sold in Southern California. I bought it a couple years ago and thought I would ride it here it Texas however things have changed and I am now offering it for sale. I have owned three previous Laverda’s: a 1976 3cl with Jota cams etc., and a 1978 3cl, and a coveted 1974 SFC (the last new one on the planet in 1978). However this Jota is special and has super low miles.

This bike was set up to race at Riverside in the 80’s but never got the chance (AMA changed the requirements) so I am told by the previous owner. The bike was completely disassembled and modified slightly. If you look closely on the pictures you will notice the frame was reinforced in the air filter area.  If you look close at the exhaust down tubes you will see another reinforced cross tube installed. These frame modifications stabilize the bike at higher speeds.  There are custom made foot levers for the gear shifting and the brake assemblies.  You can see that the rear disc brake was also modified in an upside down configuration. One off parts to accommodate the mounting. All the modifications are done with forethought and implementation. The powder coating on the frame, wheels, and fork sliders is very thick and shiny.

This bike sounds incredible, idles perfectly, and runs like a Jota should. Handles beautifully. It is robust and throaty. The paint is excellent. One imperfection on the back tail piece is a hairline crack near the mounting screw. Probably overtightened at one point. Tires are in good shape.

I located new Vox bell horns and they will be included along with a mirror, purchased from Wolfgang. I forgot to take a picture of under the seat area and battery. It is as nice as the rest of the bike. Any questions shoot me an email.

1977 Laverda Jota R Rear Detail

So while I’d prefer my Laverdas to be orange, this looks to be a really great, although not completely original example. But really, the Jota wasn’t a factory model anyway, and varied from region to region in terms of specification, so what are a few more performance updates between friends? The work looks to be a very high standard and, color aside, this is one of the nicest Laverdas I’ve seen in a while.

-tad

1977 Laverda Jota L Side

 

Some Assembly Required: 1984 Laverda Triple Project Bike

1984 Laverda RGA R Frame

I wouldn’t normally include someone’s unfinished project like this Laverda Jota RGA here on CSBFS: too many questions, too little information, usually not enough photos to even get a good idea what you’re getting. And what you’re getting is usually in pretty sad shape: boxes of rusty, seized parts, battered bodywork, and grungy, hacked-up wiring. Claims that the project is “85% complete,” with those missing 15% comprised of completely unobtainable bits…

1984 Laverda RGA Engine

Plus, you’re all coming here to drool over the coolest old bikes on the internet, and it’s sometimes hard to get excited by an unfinished project. It’s like looking at a countertop covered with flour, eggs, and blocks of baker’s chocolate, trying to get excited about the cake that could be made from those ingredients…

But when the ingredients are as nice as this, it’s hard not to imagine that the finished article would be spectacular, so use a bit of imagination and join me in fantasizing about what could be!

1984 Laverda RGA Tank

From the original eBay listing: 1984 Laverda Jota RGA Project for Sale

At auction is a 1984 Laverda Jota RGA, Orange,120 degree triple, project bike, disassembled into major components and sub-assemblies, in 15 boxes. Includes new Sprint full lower fairing, unpainted. I have owned this bike for about 10 years, bought fully assembled and in extremely original but tired condition. After acquiring, an orderly disassembly proceeded, frame was powdercoated, along with bracketry, handlebars, all aluminum (sideplates, Etc.) polished and boxed, many special stainless fittings and fasteners from Motalia included. Carbs disassembled and vapor cleaned, includes all new parts. Rebuild kits for Brembo brakes included, Speigler lines included. Tires are new Dunlop tt100’s and tubes mounted on newly powdercoated wheels. New stainless exhaust system included, fully polished. New Witt electronic ignition included. All new spares included with the bike, generally sourced from Wolfgang Haerter in Canada or Motalia in England. Everything has been stored in heated/ air-conditioned storage, no sunlight. All seat parts and upholstery are unmarked, no cuts or tears.

Laverda’s Jota was basically a hot-rod version of their 981cc 3CL. Powered by an overhead-cam triple, the bike was very fast right out of the box. But UK tuners at Slater Laverda saw that there was even more potential in the engine, and developed the Jota using high-compression pistons, wilder cams, and lots of very orange paint…

Jotas do vary in specification, depending on where they were sold, with US versions notable tamer than the original UK bikes. And after 1982, the triple featured a revised crankshaft that smoothed power but also tamed the beast slightly, making the earlier bikes more desirable. Although this is not the original, 180° “true” Jota, all the variations of Laverda’s three-cylinder motor are packed with character and performance.

1984 Laverda RGA Carbs

The RGS that followed was an attempt to recast the big Laverda in a more civilized light and the RGA was a slightly less expensive version of the bike that featured a slightly awkward bikini fairing, instead of the fully-enclosed bodywork. I’d probably leave that bit off if this were my project… Although painted up, the included Sprint lower fairing could make for a very cool look as well: it features a classic, dual-round-headlight look that is much more stylish than the standard RGS square unit. When finished, it could look something like this bike we featured a while back: Laverda RGA Sprint for sale.

1984 Laverda RGA Bodywork

This basically looks complete, with all the hard work done. It’s a shame the seller never got the chance to complete this project, but this looks like a very good project for a handy individual to build a snorting Italian sport-touring motorcycle from the ground-up!

-tad

1984 Laverda RGA Fairing

 

 

 

1981 Laverda 1000 Jota

1981 Laverda Jota L Side

Another Laverda just popped up for sale! There’ve been so many of these lately, you’d think they were easy to find in nice shape.

They aren’t.

Laverda was never all that popular in the US, and they’re correspondingly rare. There aren’t a ton of shops that specialize in them, but in this internet age, there’s plenty of information and a strong online community. These are well-built bikes, and many owners are comfortable turning a wrench on them.

1981 Laverda Jota R engine

The Jota, one of the most iconic Laverdas, isn’t really even a factory model. It was a hot-rod 3C whipped up by Slater Laverda in England and was introduced in 1976. The name “Jota” refers to a Spanish dance in triple-time, and the bike is, in typical Laverda fashion, brutal, slightly heavy, and very stable at speed.

Of course I want one.

1981 Laverda Jota Dash

This one’s supposedly a real-deal Jota, although I’m not sure he’s clear on exactly what he has… From the original eBay listing: 1981 Laverda Jota 1000 for Sale

Laverda 1000 Jota 120° (The real Jota)

This bike have been in my garage for the last 15 years.

The motor is in great condition, completely overhauled just before I put the bike away.

The chassis could use some service, it’s still in running condition.

Please look closely on the pictures.

The bike has no battery, it died of high age.

The bike has a new electronic ignition system, the standard comes with the bike but it makes the bike almost impossible to start.

I assume the seller actually means it’s a 180° bike, since it’s actually the later, post-1982, 120° version that’s more tame and not a “real Jota…” The original Jota featured the 180º crank with “one up, two down” pistons that basically ran like a four with a miss. Nevertheless, the configuration gave big power and manageable vibration…

Update! Since I started writing this, the seller has corrected his “degree” mistake in the eBay listing!

From the photos, it looks like he’s got the original fairing as well, should you want to return it to the factory style. I prefer the naked look, but that bulbous fairing should make for a more practical ride… As if a burly, vibrating Italian triple from 1970’s is anything like practical…

As always: do your homework. 3C’s are not inexpensive, but they’re far less than a nice Jota and it’s not difficult to fake one.

-tad

1981 Laverda Jota R Rear

 

1976 Laverda 3CL 1000 for Sale

1976 Laverda 3CL 1000 R Side

Hey look!  Another Laverda!  Well, this one isn’t quite ready to ride, but I’ll forgive it, since it’s a manly brute of a 70’s musclebike.  When people think of three cylinder Laverdas, they often remember the brassy, tangerine bomber named after a Spanish dance.  But the Jota, while very collectable and very orange, isn’t as practical or civilized as the more pedestrian 3C.

1976 Laverda 3CL 1000 Dash

The Laverda 3C was the three cylinder follow up to the 750 SF twin featured recently.  First available in 1973, the bike displaced 981cc’s, made 80hp and ran the bike up to 130mph.  Until 1982, Laverda used a 180 degree crank in the motor, with pistons oriented “one up, two down”.  This improved performance and gave the bike a distinctive, throaty roar, but wasn’t particularly smooth.  Later motors were given a 120 degree crank and the bike had a much more civilized character as a result, but lost some of its raw edge.

1976 Laverda 3CL 1000 R Front

While the triples were not quite as reliable as the earlier twins, they were very well built and durable bikes with few problems that can’t be solved with diligent maintenance and simple updates.

This one needs a little TLC: 1976 Laverda 1000 3CL for Sale

Laverda 1000 3CL for restoration.  The bike is complete and original except for the exhaust.  There are no dents in the tank, fenders or headlight.  It shows 11,036 miles on the odometer.  I can’t guarantee that the mileage is correct, but it may well be, as the bike has been in storage for a long time. 

The motor is free and the transmission shifts through the gears.  Of course the bike will need a service or rebuild of all the major systems, as you would expect of any bike that was parked for a long time.  There is no battery installed.  I removed the brake master cylinders and calipers a few years ago and disassembled them to start the restoration process.  That was as far as I got before life got in the way.  I have loosely reassmbled and reinstalled them so that you can see that they are all there and so that they can be shipped with the bike.

The bike was titled as a 1972 by the previous owner.  This may have qualified the bike for antique status.  Based on my research the bike has to be a 1976, ’77 or ’78 as those were the only years for this version of this model.  I have the title, signed over by the previous owner, in my possession.

1976 Laverda 3CL 1000 L Engine

So a few caveat emptor bits in there but, considering that the opening bid is $5,200 and there are no takers with two days left on the auction, this might be a great opportunity for a classic bike fan with a bit of know-how.

-tad

1976 Laverda 3CL 1000 L Side