Tagged: air cooled

Sophisticated Performer: 1957 Ariel Square Four for Sale

1957 Ariel Square Four L Side

A vintage luxury sports machine, the Ariel Square Four had, as the name suggests, four whole cylinders at a time when most motorcycles of the period had just one or two. Automobile components can get away with being heavy, but over-engineered solutions in a motorcycle application mean significantly reduced performance and, for years, four-cylinder engines weren’t compatible with twin demands of light weight and reliability. Inline fours can be tricky to package into a motorcycle, particularly when configured longitudinally, as was common before the Honda CB750. But the Ariel uses an interesting “square” format that features a pair of parallel twins, complete with a crankshaft for each. Not only did this solution offer up the power and smoothness of an inline four, the very compact design meant it could be squeezed into existing frames meant to house a parallel twin. No surprise, as the design was originally intended for BSA.

1957 Ariel Square Four R Side Rear

The first generation of Square Four displaced 500cc with a bump to 601 for increased torque, so riders using the bike as practical transport could more easily drag the weight of a sidecar around. That early overhead cam design had issues with overheating, as the square four configuration naturally has a hard time getting cooling air to the rear pair of cylinders. Suzuki’s later RG500 engine used liquid-cooling to get around this problem, but that was obviously not an option here.

1957 Ariel Square Four Dash

The engine saw a complete overhaul in 1937 with a shift from overhead cams to cam-in-block and pushrods, but a big jump in displacement to 997cc.  In 1949, the iron head became aluminum for a huge savings in weight and the version seen here is the final iteration, with four individual exhaust pipes, instead of the earlier pair of siamesed parts that make the bike look like it’s powered by a bulky parallel twin.

1957 Ariel Square Four Engine

From the original eBay listing: 1957 Ariel Square Four for Sale

Up for sale is a restored Ariel Sq4 This bike was completely restored 10 years ago and sat in a collection for 5 years.  I bought it and meet the person who restored it in Mass. He is good at what he does and the bike still shows very well. All the miles were put on by me, last being a 50 mile ride 2 years ago. The bike has been started and ran in the last few months. It will start right up and operate very smooth. There are no known problems. The restoration was both mechanical and cosmetic at the time. Buyer will be responsible for transportation from Pgh PA.

I’m assuming “Pgh” is Pittsburgh in this case. There’s very little time on this auction, with bidding up just north of $16,000 and the reserve not yet met.

1957 Ariel Square Four Tank

So what’ll she do, mister? Well that nearly full liter of displacement gave 45hp and the bike weighed a surprisingly svelte 425lbs, so the Square Four could very nearly “do the ton.” But while bikes like the BSA Gold Star were about ultimate performance, the Square Four was about the way in which it delivered that performance, and the smooth relaxed power and sophistication was really in a class by itself from the bike’s introduction in 1931 until it was discontinued in 1959, a remarkable production run for any motorcycle.

-tad

1957 Ariel Square Four R Side

Rocket Man: 1979 Kawasaki Z1R TC for Sale

 1979 Kawasaki Z1R Turbo R Side

Lots of sportbikes, even vintage sportbikes do many things well: handling is almost always part of the package. Many are very fast, some are reliable, and a few will even take you on long journeys in relative comfort. The Kawasaki Z1R TC does only one of these things, but it does so with such enthusiasm that it’s hard not to give it a pass on the others. In the 1970s, Kawasaki built bikes that seemed to be in-tune with the American Psychology of Going Fast that stressed straight-line speed over handling prowess, very much like musclecars of the era. Their H1 and, to a lesser extent, H2 two-stroke triples had power that easily overwhelmed their limp chassis and got miserable gas mileage, but that hardly mattered for folks interested in beating the car or bike next to them away from a stoplight. The four-stroke Z1R had acceptable handling and decent brakes, but slap a big, uncivilized turbo on there as seen on the TC and all that went out the window.

1979 Kawasaki Z1R Turbo Rear

The Z1R TC was the first bike of the turbo craze that afflicted all of the Japanese manufacturers to a certain extent in the 1980s, a trend that was largely a dead-end at the time. Modern turbos are refined and smooth, giving us engines with durability, increased power when you need it and good gas mileage when you don’t, all with minimal lag. These characteristics are largely the result of modern fuel injection systems and the electronics that control them. Both of which are missing here.

1979 Kawasaki Z1R Turbo Front

Early turbo engines needed to have low compression-ratios so they wouldn’t explode when the boost was up, which exacerbated “turbo lag,” the delay between when you put your foot to the floor and when the power kicks in, a result of the turbo needing to time to spin up and begin generating boost and thus power. Turbo lag was notoriously tricky to manage in sports cars of the era and is even more challenging when combined with skinny tires, marginal handling, and the lean angles you’re looking at when riding a motorcycle aggressively.

1979 Kawasaki Z1R Turbo Gauges

And that was assuming the bike didn’t just grenade between your legs. Early test bikes were “built” with stronger engine internals, but bikes sold to the public only included these at an additional charge, and many went without what should have been a mandatory upgrade. Shopping online, you’ll find that they often have had significant engine overhauls, because of blown motors or smart owners looking to prevent hot, fast-moving engine parts from sharing space with vital organs…

From the original eBay listing: 1979 Kawasaki Z1R TC for Sale

I have decided to sell my dream bike of my younger years. If you know what you’re looking at and your youth was in the late 70’s and early 80’s this bad boy was likely on your wish list along with Farrah Fawcett and the Whale Tail 930 Turbo Porsche. Next to Farrah this was the wildest thing you could throw a leg over! What more could a bulletproof wild child ask for? 

Make no mistake this bike was the things fantasies were made of and the tool required to make them come true. Much like the efforts that delivered the Shelby to Ford, Motion and Balwin cars to Chevrolet and the Hurst Hemi’s to mother Mopar, Turbo Cycle and Kawasaki teamed up to build a two wheeled rocket that would clean the clocks and wallets of whoever stepped up to the line against it.    

This bike is all original with a copy of the original sales certificate registered in the archives of Turbo Cycle confirming this is the matching numbers motor and frame and truly one of the original 250 produced. All original manuals are included as are all original parts less the Warblo fuel pump that was long gone when I bought the bike nearly 10 years ago. The bike is shown with and currently runs a newer Mikuni flat slide and K&N air filter but the original Zenith carb and triangle air filter are included.

The bike is shown with the white tank emblems and shorter LTD shocks on the rear but again the originals are included and in excellent condition.

The bike has newer tires, battery and had one quality repaint years before I bought it with new original Molly Graphics. This is not a kit/clone or wanna be-it’s the undisputed real deal that any collector or museum would be proud to own and display. 

The bike runs great and is a piece of styling art to behold. Mad Max would be proud to spool it up down under. When this old girl comes on the boost you better have your toes under the shifter and brake levers and a firm grip on the bars because just like when you hit hyperspace playing Space Invaders things are going to get blurry in a hurry. This thing is no game or toy-it is still scary fast.

While I had had the privilege of owning I have displayed it a many vintage / classic bike shows and was honored to be invited to display it at the AMA display and the Kawasaki featured marque display at Mid-Ohio Vintage Bike Days a few years back. The bike deserves to be on display and in the hands of a curator to insure this piece of history is enjoyed and around for years to come. 

1979 Kawasaki Z1R Turbo Paint

It’s not clear if the engine in this bike has had any serious work done from the listing, or if it had the upgrades installed originally, but it appears to otherwise be in excellent condition: many that come up for sale are pretty rough cosmetically, seemingly the fate of many Japanese bikes of the era. The seller is looking for $25,000 as a Buy It Now price, which is top-dollar, but these are certainly some of the rarest and fastest streetbikes of the era and have been steadily increasing in value.

-tad

1979 Kawasaki Z1R Turbo L Side

Last of the Air-Cooled Racers: 1972 Yamaha TD-3 for Sale

1972 Yamaha TD3 L Rear
Racebikes tend to have an unmistakably spare aesthetic, a mechanical pragmatism sadly hidden behind often garishly-painted plastics. And the endless march of progress sees older machines facing obsolescence continually updated, evolving to meet the threat of newer, faster machines. That’s the case with this 1972 TD-3, the last of Yamaha’s air-cooled, two-stroke production racebikes before the TZ series was introduced.  Yamaha actually pulled their factory 250cc World Championship machines out of competition after 1969, but the smaller machines were well supported by incentives and popular among privateer racers.

1972 Yamaha TD3 L Front Fairing

The TD-3 replaced, naturally, the TD-2 as Yamaha’s production 250cc racebike. Introduced in 1971, the bike featured a new dry clutch, lightweight frame, and six-speed gearbox. Slightly less oversquare bore and stroke of 54mm x 54mm matched the 247cc of the previous bike, with revised inlet and transfer ports to increase power. Producing almost 50hp, with just 231lbs dry to drag around, the TD-3 was plenty quick, with a top speed of over 140mph, depending on gearing and, of course, the rider’s weight…

1972 Yamaha TD3 Tank

From the original eBay listing: 1972 Yamaha TD-3 for Sale

This is a 1971 or 1972 Yamaha TD-3. The production racer years of production were not very accurate, but the TD-3 replaced the TD-2 in Motorcycle Grand Prix racing in 1971. By 1973, the TZ came out, which was a TD-3 with liquid cooling. This is a beautiful race bike which I raced for about 10 years. From about 1997 to 2006. I won the WERA Mid-Atlantic Championship with this bike in 2002. I have the trophy as proof! After 2002, work got in the way of racing and I could only participate in 3-4 races a year, so I was not able to garner enough points to be a contender, but the bike was very competitive. In 2006 I started the season, I only did a pre-race practice at Summit Point and decided to hang up my leathers. I had gained too much weight so that I did not fit comfortably in my leathers and was too heavy for a 250 class bike anyway. But, I had prepared the bike for the season in 2006 with new race compound Avons and I had put in next size new pistons and had lowered the ratios with a slightly smaller pinion as I felt that I was not getting enough power out of slow turns and my top speed was as high or higher than the Honda 4-stroke 350cc twins that were the main competition. Note: This was and probably still is a WERA Vintage 2 class race bike. The motor has chrome cylinders and the rebuild consists of installing the next size pistons and rings. I have a new pair of pistons and rings for the next size which I will include. A set of pistons and rings for this bike probably go for a pretty penny these days, if you can find them. This bike was racing relatively recently, so there have been class legal improvements made that the original race bikes did not have. It has a Penton PVL magneto ignition system which replaced the original Hitachi system, which I think I still have laying around. The bike does not need a battery. It has Works Performance rear shocks and an Italian Laverda SF front drum brake (Super Freno or Super Brake in English) and additional frame gusseting (to stiffen it) compared to the original. You will see a “MyLaps” lap timing transponder on the left fork leg which I think can be assigned to a new racer. The TD-3 has a dry clutch which you can see in the photos and a new set of friction discs were installed in 2006 and are unused except for a practice lap. As with most racers, the oil pump has been removed and it runs on mix. I have always used Silkolene Castorene. It will need a carburetor cleaning as the mix in the bowls will have varnished up, but it is out of the box ready to race. I have notes regarding jetting and the last jetting was for high humidity summer racing in the Mid Atlantic region. It has been stored in a dry trailer. 

 Mileage is unknown but an estimate is 10 laps at 3 miles for 6 average races a year = 1,800 miles plus practice = 2,500.
1972 Yamaha TD3 Engine
No display piece this, I only wish the seller had bothered to roll it out of his box trailer to take some nicer pictures! But even lurking in its cage, this little beast is obviously in good cosmetic condition and in excellent mechanical condition, with some upgrades that aren’t period-correct but should increase performance and reliability: the CDI ignition fitted to the TD-3 caused detonation problems when the bike was new, but this machine has a different setup. And that Laverda front brake is pretty state-of-the art, at least in terms of drum brake technology, and should provide impressive stopping power for this lightweight machine.

1972 Yamaha TD3 Front Wheel

While it is sad to see consumables being… consumed, it’s also great to see machines designed for racing actually being raced, instead of hidden away in garages. Racing a vintage motorcycle is obviously more about the sense of community and history than outright speed, since there are much cheaper ways to go fast. But if you’re looking to spend some time on track and like to tinker, a machine like this could be a lot of fun.

-tad

1972 Yamaha TD3 On Track

Mean, Green, and Canadian: 1984 Kawasaki KZ1100R ELR for Sale

1984 Kawasaki KZ1100R R Front

Big, brash, and charismatic, big superbike replicas like the KZ1100R put paid to the stereotype that a UJM is doomed to be some sort of boring appliance. Sure, the “Universal Japanese Motorcycle” does sound a bit familiar and unexciting, but the formula flat works. Based on the garden-variety KZ1000J, the original KZ1000R displaced less than that bike’s 105cc, down to 998cc to make it eligible for racing and it featured general updates to the already venerable air-cooled inline four aimed at increasing power and keeping the bike’s reliable reputation intact. But engine updates alone don’t a sportbike make and, although the R was heavy, revised frame geometry gave the bike the agility needed. The K1100R was an update to the original bike, with a bigger 1089cc engine.

1984 Kawasaki KZ1100R L Rear

So what about this whole “ELR” thing? Well this lurid green monster was a race replica meant to celebrate the successes for Eddie Lawson, rider for Kawasaki and successful AMA Superbike competitor. The original K1000R was the real-deal Eddie Lawson Replica and, although the K1100R certainly looks the part, purists often seem to consider it less desirable.

1984 Kawasaki KZ1100R Tank

From the original eBay listing: 1983 Kawasaki KZ1100R for Sale

Second owner, 1984 Kawasaki Eddie Lawson superbike replica KZ1100R with 20,000km (13,000 miles). Canadian model. Bike starts, runs, and drives excellent. Needs nothing except a new home. original bike color changed from Stardust Blue to Green last year. Top quality paint work with 6 coats of clear and a new decal kit from England. Inside of tank was professionally recoated and guaranteed for life. Every other part on this bike was powdercoated other than the frame and engine. Engine is completely stock and has not been worked on or modified (other than valve cover gasket). Updated brake lines front and back. These beautiful bikes are getting more rare every day. Original owners manual and tool kit included as well as spare keys. Kerker purchased last year. Clean and clear title in hand. All original parts included with sale (I have spent years collecting hard to find parts). See list below for all extras included with sale. 

Extras included:

  • New front tire
  • Set of working carbs
  • OEM front fender (new paint as well)
  • Shop manual
  • Gasket kit
  • Fuel petcock complete
  • OEM crash guards
  • OEM airbox and filter
  • OEM intake boots
  • Spare chain guard
  • OEM decals
  • Decals, cables, and hardware

1984 Kawasaki KZ1100R L Tank

The starting bid is $10,000 with no takers yet and very little time left on the auction. This second generation machine represents and evolution of the original KZ1000R Eddie Lawson Replica but was built in greater numbers and is generally considered less desirable. The price is on the high side, but I wonder if the color change is affecting the bidding as well: even a really good paint job isn’t likely to be as desirable as the original paint in good condition and, no matter how high the quality, a change of color definitely has an impact on values. I prefer the green as well but, if the seller was concerned about maintaining the bike’s long-term value, I’d have suggested he keep it original.

Also, the bike’s in Calgary, Canada so that may be turning folks off buyers here in the US as well.

-tad

1984 Kawasaki KZ1100R R Rear

Round-Case Roadster: 1974 Ducati GT750 for Sale

1974 Ducati GT750 L Front

The round-case Ducati 750 Sport and Super Sport get most of the attention, with their sexy looks and uncompromising riding positions. But the GT750 was actually the first roadgoing Ducati to use their famous L-twin engine and is a far more practical package, for riders that plan to spend more time riding than admiring their motorcycles.

1974 Ducati GT750 R Side

Introduced in 1971, the 748cc 90° twin is the beautiful, beating heart of the bike. Tower shafts and bevel-drive housings on the head suggest Ducati’s desmodromics, but unlike modern Ducatis, only the top-of-the-line Super Sports got the Desmo system, and the GT made do with simple valve springs.

I understand that modern performance and reliability come with the need for radiators, wires, and little black plastic boxes, but there’s something very appealing about the finned aluminum center of this beast. Visually, it dominates the bike in the best sense, and drips with a combination of engineering and craftsmanship. And with 60 claimed horsepower and lots of torque, it offers up plenty of real-world performance, even today.

1974 Ducati GT750 Tank Engine

This 1974 example would have been one of the very last bikes built before the switch to the less elegant square-case engines. There’s little performance difference, but purists prefer the more elegant round-case bikes, and it’s easy to see why.

1974 Ducati GT750 Throttle

From the original eBay listing: 1974 Ducati GT750 for Sale

For sale a 1974 Ducati GT750, this bike is a very clean rider in good condition with many rare hard to find items, I’ve owned this iconic Ducati for the past 7 years. The Kentucky title clean/clear in my name and in hand.

Motor was completely rebuilt by Saarland Ducati (Bevel specialist in Germany) in 2012 it has approximately 800 miles on the rebuild, during those 800 miles the bevels/shims clearances was checked for tolerance around 400-500 miles with no issues. 

Installed Dyna electronic ignition making this Beautiful bike more user rider friendly, the PHF 30’s cleaned last September 2015, new battery installed Dec 2015. Bike starts with a couple of kicks, idles and runs nicely and sounds great through the original Conti’s.

The hard to find parts:

  • Borrani’s rims 18″/19″ with new Metzler Lasertec tires (zero miles)
  • Aprilia dash, horn/hi-beam switch, headlight and fuse box, 
  • Original seat pan with a very nice reproduction seat cover
  • Tommaselli handbar and throttle assembly 
  • Marzocchi shocks
  • Ceriani forks
  • Original Conti exhaust system 
  • Dellorto PHF 30A carburetors 
  • Dyna electronic ignition 
  • Clean rust free tank, original steel side covers, the Burnt Orange paint’s in very nice condition and was done in 2008 
  • New battery
  • Rare side stand and center stand

Runs good with no issues

I’ve enjoyed this beautiful motorcycle for several years but, now its time to shift my collection and let someone else enjoy this fantastic bike.

1974 Ducati GT750 R Front

Bidding is up over $15,000 with very little time left on the auction, with a Buy It Now price of just under $20,000. Obviously, this bike’s days as “the affordable Bevel” are long past, but this particular example looks to have been well cared for by a enthusiast owner, and the GT750 offers up plenty of style, performance, and a dash of practicality.

-tad

1974 Ducati GT750 L Side

Teutonic Trackday Terror: 1973 BMW R-Series Endurance Racer for Sale

1973 BMW R-Series Endurance Racer L Front

BMW’s boxer twins have long been associated with old men, heated grips, and hard luggage. But there have been racing Beemers as long as there have been Beemers and the quirky, shaft-drive “air-head” bikes are durable and can be extremely quick when properly prepared. This particular R-Series bike includes a veritable who’s-who of German race and top-shelf performance parts, with Silent Hektik twin-plug points-less electronic ignition [they also do Guzzis!], a Werner Fallert deep oil sump, restoration work by Hinrich Hinck, and uprated Lockheed brakes to replace the reportedly unimpressive stock front stoppers.

1973 BMW R-Series Endurance Racer R Rear

The original listing also mentions Gus Kuhn, whose name is proudly displayed on the side of the bare-metal tank. Gus Kuhn was a British racer, tuner, and dealer during the 1950s and 1960s. Although he died in 1966, Gus Kuhn Motors successfully raced Nortons and BMWs, eventually becoming one of the top BMW dealers in the world. It’s not clear from the listing if this is an actual Gus Kuhn machine or one simply intended as a tribute.

1973 BMW R-Series Endurance Racer Tank

From the original eBay listing: 1973 BMW R-Series Endurance Racer for Sale

Gus Kuhn Endurance, Marzocchi Lockheed GP Kroeber, Silent Hektik ignition, short piston engine overhauled

We have bought this Endurance Racer in Great Britain. Together with our friend Hinrich Hinck we decided to restore this very nice classic racer. We wanted to get as possible a high degree of originality. But we also wanted to build a very good racing machine and together with the experienced Hinrich Hinck we have done it.

The result: engine overhauled by BMW engine specialist Israel with short piston, Fallert oil pan,  Lockheed GP brakes, Marzocchi front fork, 18 inch rim, Kröber rev counter, aluminium fuel tank, Silent Hektik ignition, double spark,

Now it is ready to race for classic events.

1973 BMW R-Series Endurance Racer Engine Detail

Please note that the bike currently resides in Germany but, since it’s in no way road-legal, at least there’s no question as to whether or not it can be registered here in the US. There’s plenty of time left on the listing, with six days still to go, and bidding has not hit the reserve. At just over $3,000 that’s no surprise. Given the components, preparation, and that gorgeous bare-aluminum tank, this should be worth double that figure, assuming the right eclectic buyer can be found.

-tad

1973 BMW R-Series Endurance Racer L Side

Unrestored Race-Replica: 1979 Suzuki GS1000S Wes Cooley for Sale

1979 Suzuki GS1000S Wes Cooley R Side Front

Originally designed for the European market, where handling and agility often trumped straight-line speed, the Suzuki GS1000S offered the best of both worlds, although the US received only a handful of these well-balanced machines: just 500 were imported in 1979 and 700 in 1980.

1979 Suzuki GS1000S Wes Cooley L Side Engine

A race-replica from the 1970s Superbike era, the GS featured Suzuki’s famously rugged, 997cc air-cooled inline four in a relatively lightweight, very stiff frame. Lighter than the GS750 that spawned it, this engine went on to serve for many years in Suzuki’s line up, and while it wasn’t the most powerful of the Japanese fours, the complete package offered up an impressive balance of handling, braking, and power that allowed bikes ridden by Wes Cooley and tuned by Pops Yoshimura to win the hotly contested AMA Superbike Championship in 1979 and 1980.

1979 Suzuki GS1000S Wes Cooley Dash

The bike seen here was never officially associated with Wes Cooley, but the link was undeniable and the name “Wes Cooley Replica” stuck.

From the original eBay listing: 1979 Suzuki GS1000S Wes Cooley for Sale

Up for sale is my Super Rare Unrestored WES COOLEY GS1000S, the bike is unrestored and has 22k original miles but looks almost brand new and runs like brand new and if you didn’t look at the odometer you would think it is a 1000 mile bike, there are no scratches, dents or chips in the paint and the chrome pipes look new. If your looking at this motorcycle you probably know all about it as bikes of this caliber and rarity do not come up often so don’t miss your chance, bike is all original and unrestored. Pictures speak for themselves

1979 Suzuki GS1000S Wes Cooley R Side Engine

Bidding is very active on this bike and is currently north of $7,000 with plenty of time left on the auction. These were pretty rare to begin with, and their practical nature means many have racked up pretty high mileage or been ridden hard and put away wet. This example is about as clean as you’ll ever find, and is claimed to be completely original, striking the perfect balance between a usable machine that’s been ridden and a museum-perfect collectible.

-tad

1979 Suzuki GS1000S Wes Cooley L Side

Blue-and-White Bullet: 1980 Suzuki GS1000S Wes Cooley Replica for Sale

1980 Suzuki GS1000S L Side Front

Suzuki’s blue-and-white bullet, the GS1000S was, in spite of the hulking style, dual shocks, and bulbous fairing, really more of an all-rounder than its looks would suggest. It was originally intended to appeal to European riders but, while road riders here in the USA prize straight-line stability and torque over handling, racers saw the appeal, and the GS1000S became the basis for Suzuki’s AMA Superbike racing machines.

1980 Suzuki GS1000S Engine Detail

Compared to the Kawasakis and Hondas of the same era, the Suzuki wasn’t as quick, but it made up for its power deficit by being nimble, with a stiff frame and excellent brakes. None of these bikes were really featherweights, but the difference was noticeable both on and off the track.

1980 Suzuki GS1000S R Front

Race bike building was handled by the iconic “Pops” Yoshimura and ridden to victory by Wes Cooley, both of whom transitioned from Kawaskakis. The relationship was beneficial to everyone involved, and Wes won the AMA Superbike Championship two years running. The GS1000S was never officially associated with Wes Cooley, but riders in the States dubbed them “Wes Cooley Replicas” after the fact and the name stuck.

1980 Suzuki GS1000S Dash

Specification-wise, the bike isn’t particularly exciting: a two-valve, 997cc air-cooled four putting 90hp through a five-speed box, 525lbs wet weight, and a 130mph top speed. But it’s really the package that made this work and the proof, as they say, is in the pudding.

1980 Suzuki GS1000S Rear Suspension

From the original eBay listing: 1980 Suzuki GS1000S Wes Cooley Replica for Sale

If you had the resources to rebuild a classic, limited production Superbike and fit it with every upgrade available back in the era when this bike ruled the streets, this is what you would have.

NOTE: This is a 1980 Wes Cooley Replica. It was produced for only the years 1979 and 1980 with production numbers estimated to be in the 750 range for 1980. The factory rear-set foot controls fitted only to the 1980 version makes this a one-of-a-kind frame as all of the other GS1000 standard chain drive bikes had the same frame. The 1980 version cannot be “faked” because of its unique frame, unlike the ’79 version that used an ordinary frame.

This bike was a frame-up rebuild which included the following:

ENGINE:

– New Valve Job 

– Freshly honed cylinders with brand new OEM Suzuki rings

– Valves adjusted

– New Mobil One synthetic oil and Fram oil filter

– New NGK spark plugs

PERFORMANCE EXTRAS:

– Dyna Tech electronic ignition

– Dyna 3 Ohm (green) coils

Taylor ignition wires (brand new)

– Yoshimura Replica stainless steel exhaust (cost $750 shipped here on eBay)

– Aftermarket wire wheels with stainless spokes – wider than stock

– Aftermarket Rear sets. Especially rare as these only fit this one exact year/model bike

– Braided stainless brake lines with clear covering (that won’t scratch paint)

– Adjustable Clutch Lever and dogleg front brake lever

There’s more information about the build over on eBay, so pop over for a look. The Buy-It-Now price is set at $12,000 which honestly seems like a very nice price for a bike with this much work put into it. Yeah, you can find a decent Wes Cooley for less, but they’re appreciating in value, and this one has been comprehensively restored and tastefully upgraded. These are extremely rugged motorcycles as well, and that makes them especially appealing to collectors who want to actually ride and enjoy, rather than display their pride and joys.

-tad

1980 Suzuki GS1000S R Side

Jack-Of-All-Trades: 1975 BMW R75/6 for Sale

1975 BMW R75 L Side

Bikes like BMW’s R75/6 represent a much more do-it-all imagining of the sportbike, before race-bred ergonomics and peaky powerplants made them impossibly focused and of far more limited utility than they are today. And although BMW’s have, until the S1000RR, reveled in a sort of “older gentleman’s express” image, they’ve always been able to get a wiggle on when asked, although it was often suggested that you phone ahead if you needed any significant braking done…

1975 BMW R75 L Side Cockpit

But it’s important to remember that part of BMW’s continued success was their early realization that the future of motorcycles was exactly in that upmarket trend away from practical transportation, and they adjusted their product to match that need. And then, instead of chasing every new styling and technological trend through the 70’s and 80’s, they became more than just motorcycles. They were BMW’s.

Introduced in 1974, the /6 models featured a front disc brake and an interesting master cylinder that was tucked under the tank to provide protection during a crash that was operated via a short cable. The 749cc engine was basically a bored-out version of the smaller bikes’ “airhead” flat twin units and gave 50hp with a top speed of 110mph.

1975 BMW R75 R Side Engine

From the original eBay listing: 1975 BMW R75/6 for Sale

The bike is in amazing condition but it is over 30 years old. I has a scratch on the tank. The tach needs to be replaced. Otherwise the bike is in great condition! But please ask any questions and I’m happy to answer in detail or get a picture. There are basic nicks that just occur with time but nothing major other. The ones on the tank are the most noticeable.

This has been my 2nd rider in Brooklyn for over 5 or 6 years.  It was rebuilt and purchase from AutoBahn Kraftwerks who are AMAZING at what they do.  The bike has been routinely maintained in Brooklyn by Peter at Moto Bogataro, I’ve owned a few airheads and he is the best mechanic I’ve ever worked with.  Love, care, passion and pure knowledge. 

It has been stored in my garage and never kept outdoors.  It starts on first click unless of course it’s really cold then it may take one or two extra.  

It needs a little bit of a wash, I will do it this weekend actually and have it detailed.  🙂  There is no rust AT ALL, that mud is just a puddle I ran over comes right off!!!  Will update photos if I can in time. 

The engine is super powerful, responsive, such a blast to drive, great weight balance, comfortable, and just a pleasure even two up. 

Most of the work was done by AutoBahn but I did update the rear shocks, have new tires, worked on brakes, maintained oil change schedule.  An s-fairing could be added to it, all hook up are on the bike. 

I am selling it because I no longer have my apartment with the parking space in 2 months and cannot afford to pay for an indoor lot for two bikes. 

 

1975 BMW R75 L Side Tank

I am familiar with Moto Bogataro, one of the shops he mentions in Brooklyn. They do have an excellent reputation and do lots of work on old Laverdas and Guzzis as well.

This particular bike doesn’t show all that well in the pictures, but the seller claims it just needs a bit of cosmetic TLC. I do believe him that it’s just mud spatters showing on the pipe and not rust, as the same material is obviously there on the seat as well. But the front tire is also looking pretty low and I’m not sure why you wouldn’t take a moment to correct those issues before photographing your bike for sale on eBay. With a Buy-It-Now price of $5,700 it’s not exactly cheap, but you’re looking at what appears to be a very solid example of an extremely classic sport motorcycle.

-tad

1975 BMW R75 Cockpit

Little Nipper: 1977 Honda MT125R Race Bike for Sale

1977 Honda MT125R R Side

When you’re looking to go racing, it’s easy to lust after exotic, high-performance machinery. But most of us need to think in terms of real-world practicality and consider things like “tires” and “maintenance” and that’s where bikes like this Honda MT125R fit in. Simple and cheap, it wasn’t the fastest thing out there when new, but was designed for competition and was easy to keep running.

1977 Honda MT125R Cockpit

Built for just two years, from 1977 to 1978, the Honda MT125R was a two-stroke, production racer. Parts for this little 169 pound Frankenstein-ian Monster were largely derived from other production motorcycles in Honda’s stable, with just the frame and bodywork being unique to the MT125. The engine, notably, was from the proven and durable CR125 off-road model, making parts especially easy to come by.

1977 Honda MT125R R Tank

That little 123cc two-stroke, air-cooled single put 26bhp through a 6-speed gearbox. Interestingly, Honda did produce a liquid cooling kit that could be fitted to the bike, including a new cylinder and head, water pump, and accessories.

While 26hp is real power in such a featherweight bike, it’s all up at the top of the tach, and the bike required a brutal launch technique with screaming revs and lots of slip. First-generation bikes had a cable-operated front brake, although this one sensibly features a later hydraulic unit, here fitted with a braided line.

1977 Honda MT125R R Rear

From the original eBay listing: 1977 Honda MT125R for Sale

Nice Honda MT125R classic racer. AHRMA Formula 125 eligible. All there, good compression. I have “dry” installed a Jerry Lodge hydraulic front brake conversion (uses a early 2000 Yamaha DT125r or TTr125 caliper and master). The fairing is a bit cracked here and there but I installed it for illustration and it would protect the bike if it is shipped. You can get new from Airtech etc..

This looks more like a bike for someone interesting in vintage racing, not simply collecting, as the bike does feature some practical upgrades and is not in absolutely perfect condition. Bidding is almost ridiculously low at just $1,225, a screaming deal for all the track-day fun you’d have with this little nipper.

-tad

1977 Honda MT125R L Side