Tagged: airhead

Jack-Of-All-Trades: 1975 BMW R75/6 for Sale

1975 BMW R75 L Side

Bikes like BMW’s R75/6 represent a much more do-it-all imagining of the sportbike, before race-bred ergonomics and peaky powerplants made them impossibly focused and of far more limited utility than they are today. And although BMW’s have, until the S1000RR, reveled in a sort of “older gentleman’s express” image, they’ve always been able to get a wiggle on when asked, although it was often suggested that you phone ahead if you needed any significant braking done…

1975 BMW R75 L Side Cockpit

But it’s important to remember that part of BMW’s continued success was their early realization that the future of motorcycles was exactly in that upmarket trend away from practical transportation, and they adjusted their product to match that need. And then, instead of chasing every new styling and technological trend through the 70’s and 80’s, they became more than just motorcycles. They were BMW’s.

Introduced in 1974, the /6 models featured a front disc brake and an interesting master cylinder that was tucked under the tank to provide protection during a crash that was operated via a short cable. The 749cc engine was basically a bored-out version of the smaller bikes’ “airhead” flat twin units and gave 50hp with a top speed of 110mph.

1975 BMW R75 R Side Engine

From the original eBay listing: 1975 BMW R75/6 for Sale

The bike is in amazing condition but it is over 30 years old. I has a scratch on the tank. The tach needs to be replaced. Otherwise the bike is in great condition! But please ask any questions and I’m happy to answer in detail or get a picture. There are basic nicks that just occur with time but nothing major other. The ones on the tank are the most noticeable.

This has been my 2nd rider in Brooklyn for over 5 or 6 years.  It was rebuilt and purchase from AutoBahn Kraftwerks who are AMAZING at what they do.  The bike has been routinely maintained in Brooklyn by Peter at Moto Bogataro, I’ve owned a few airheads and he is the best mechanic I’ve ever worked with.  Love, care, passion and pure knowledge. 

It has been stored in my garage and never kept outdoors.  It starts on first click unless of course it’s really cold then it may take one or two extra.  

It needs a little bit of a wash, I will do it this weekend actually and have it detailed.  🙂  There is no rust AT ALL, that mud is just a puddle I ran over comes right off!!!  Will update photos if I can in time. 

The engine is super powerful, responsive, such a blast to drive, great weight balance, comfortable, and just a pleasure even two up. 

Most of the work was done by AutoBahn but I did update the rear shocks, have new tires, worked on brakes, maintained oil change schedule.  An s-fairing could be added to it, all hook up are on the bike. 

I am selling it because I no longer have my apartment with the parking space in 2 months and cannot afford to pay for an indoor lot for two bikes. 

 

1975 BMW R75 L Side Tank

I am familiar with Moto Bogataro, one of the shops he mentions in Brooklyn. They do have an excellent reputation and do lots of work on old Laverdas and Guzzis as well.

This particular bike doesn’t show all that well in the pictures, but the seller claims it just needs a bit of cosmetic TLC. I do believe him that it’s just mud spatters showing on the pipe and not rust, as the same material is obviously there on the seat as well. But the front tire is also looking pretty low and I’m not sure why you wouldn’t take a moment to correct those issues before photographing your bike for sale on eBay. With a Buy-It-Now price of $5,700 it’s not exactly cheap, but you’re looking at what appears to be a very solid example of an extremely classic sport motorcycle.

-tad

1975 BMW R75 Cockpit

1975 BMW R90S for Sale

1975 BMW R90S R Rear

Earlier this week, we featured a very nice R100/7 with a bit of café style that made it look like the earlier R90S, racier sibling of the more conservative “Slashy” bikes. My new term for the R60/2, R75/5, etc bikes. Just made it up: feel free to use it.

The wonderful thing about old BMW’s is that their handling and competence is all out of proportion to the on-paper specs and unlikelyness of the powertrain combo. You’d expect them to be pretty slow and clunky, but, as Pirelli likes to tell us: “power is nothing without control.”

1975 BMW R90S L Front

Japanese bikes of the period routinely blew their European opposition into the weeds in terms of outright power, yet somehow folks kept buying and riding the European marques so often featured on this page. Probably because they lived long enough to buy new ones and all those young hotheads on their Kawasaki H1’s died at the first serious corner they came to.

And considering how uncomfortable and uncompromising the Latin racers of the period were, it’s hard to imagine you could have speed, handling, and comfort in one package: introduced in 1974, the R90S placed first and second at the very first AMA Superbike race ever held.

1975 BMW R90S Dash

From the original eBay listing: 1975 BMW R90S for Sale 

Over $ 25,000 dollar today’s money spent by its NASA Engineer owner. The major improvements include Re-engineered engine, Harden boars & pistons, and the compression is 175 PSI (instead of usual 130 PSI), Dual plugs heads with BOSCH Blue H1 performance ignition coils, DYNA electronic pointless ignition system, PRIDMORE Lighten flight wheel, PRIMORE inlet manifolds on the original DELORTO Cabs, ALPHA BET black chromed free flow 2 in to 1 muffler, BMW Oil cooler & Deep Pan, Porsche designed CPM Magnesium “6” spokes wheels with rear wheel air cooler, enforced swing arm, BMW kick start and new Odyssey Gel Battery, Front fork legs have double braced San Jose fork braces, PRIMORE Springs in the forks and top off with SAN JOSE Triple clamp. San Jose enforced supported swing arm and RENO chromed ride off stand, KRAUSA Engine wrap crush bar, Metzler tires, expensive stainless braded front brake lines. Original tool kit, keys and owner manual are included.

The seller has helpfully included a video: BMW R90S walk-around, start up, and ride away.

1975 BMW R90S R Engine

Always happy to embrace unusual solutions, BMW mounted the R90S’ front brake master cylinder below the fuel tank and connected it to the lever via a short cable, preventing damage in the event of a crash.

It’s no garage queen, but this seems like a pretty nice example of a very collectable Bavarian bike, the choice of an intellectual rebel with a cause. I’d ditch those ridiculous “CYCLONE” stickers as soon as I could, but otherwise, this looks to be the perfect classic useable classic, combining “sport” and “touring” in equal measures.

-tad

1975 BMW R90S L Tank

 

Reader Suggestion: 1978 BMW R100/7 Custom Cafe

1978 BMW R100 7 L Side Rear

No longer quite the undiscovered gem they were, BMW’s “airhead” boxers still provide real value to the classic enthusiast. Although the rarer, sportier models like the R90S command real dollars, the more pedestrian bikes were made in sufficient numbers that, unless you’re concerned with collectability, still offer amazing bang for the buck.

Their durability probably doesn’t hurt, either: BMW’s longitudinal flat-twin is really the coelacanth of classic motorcycles, since it was knocked off by the Russians [Ural] and then that knock-off was knocked-off by the Chinese [Chang Jiang] and are still being produced to this day.

If a 1940’s engine can still provide reliable, if somewhat sedate motive power for a modern-ish motorcycle, imagine what the additional thirty years of development found in a bike from the 70’s will add! This 1978 BMW R100/7 may look pretty stock, but has been professionally repainted and restored to better-than-new condition, with upgraded components where appropriate.

1978 BMW R100 7 R Side

From the original listing: 1978 BMW R100/7 Custom Cafe for Sale

“Frame-off” powder coated, black respray, clear coated with hand painted pin striped bodywork, rebuilt motor and trans, lightened flywheel, light weight wrist pins, newer clutch, new t.o. bearing, rebuilt carbs, new Hoske mufflers, new rubber parts, new Metzeler Lazertec tires, BMW wire wheels, Dyna elec. ign.,RS solo seat, R90s handle bar, completed 2008, 1200 miles since build, new brake service Fall 2013, build by BMW restoration specialist in the Twin Cities (more info upon request)

These are very practical, reliable bikes, aside from braking that reportedly requires Johnny Carson-like levels of precognition to use effectively: even period reviews were less than stellar… Although I’d imagine updated pads or a swap to more modern components might help there and not degrade the looks much. On the upside: the rest of the package is hard to criticize: power, handling, and comfort are all there in spades.

$8,750 seems a bit steep for an R100/7, but with only 1200 miles on it since a thorough update, you’re getting what looks to be a very nicely turned-out machine. If you’re okay paying a bit more for something of quality, this could be your ride.

-tad

 

1983 BMW R65LS

For Sale: 1983 BMW R65LS

When BMW released the R65LS, it was really a remarkable styling excercise. Based on the staid (and slow) R65 series, the LS model added twin disc brakes up front, a sharp bikini fairing, model specific seat and tail section, painted snowflake wheels and model specific matte black exhaust. The rest of the bike was pure R65. Although no faster than the base model, the R65LS looked the part for a sport bike, and came with a substantially higher MSRP.

The bike was styled by Hans Muth, best known for his work with the fully faired BMW R100RS and the sharp-edged Suzuki Katana. There is a little of that Katana in the front fairing, but the look is still unique. BMW claimed that the fairing reduced front end lift by 30% – but journalists of the time wonderened aloud if front end lift was ever a problem for the little R65. Too much power was never an issue, although this boxer – like all the airhead boxers before it – did its best work on the open road.

With “sportier” (read: narrower) handlebars, the heavy R65LS takes a bit of effort to turn in. Chassis is what you would expect from BMW – reasonably comfortable but far from knife-edge handling. Suspension travel is adequate, but there can be a handful of shaft drive effect (the rear of the bike will rise under throttle and drop when the gas is chopped) if the rider is not careful. If you can put up with the odd way a BMW leans when you blip the throttle at a stoplight and you don’t mind the throbbing boxer twin on the highway, maybe this is the BMW for you.

From the seller:
1983 BMW R65LS

Engine runs great, bike rides great

New Odyssey battery ($115)

43029 miles

Tires in ok condition, some cracking but not bad

Marzocchi rear adjustable shocks

4 in tear in seat, covered with tape so it doesn’t get larger

Tool kit missing

Everything operational

The R65LS was a limited model run; in two years it would be gone. It was not the major seller that BMW had hoped, and thus it remains a unique and somewhat rare model. When properly serviced, an R65LS will make a suitable mount for in-town commuting through multi-day sport touring – as long as the “sport” part is not taken GSX-R seriously. The motors are very reliable and extremely robust – the mileage on this example is no cause for worry.

The side panels on a stock R65LS are not color coded, so these have been painted. Also, the new battery is a nice addition but I doubt it fits properly in the space provided. The R65LS takes a very specific battery size; use of a non-standard size will work, but precludes the use of the under-the-seat storage tray. Besides those nits and the obious seat tear, this bike appears to be in reasonable condition for its age. The upgraded rear shocks are a nice addition over the stock units.

For your chance to own this unique piece of (relatively recent) BMW history, click the link and jump over to the auction. For the price, it will be hard to find a better way into the world of BMW – and you can do it with a limited number, unique ride at that! Good luck to both the seller and the buyer!

MI

1976 BMW R90s

For Sale: 1976 BMW R90S

Many consider the BMW R90s to be the first real superbike. Absolute terms like “first” are the tripping hazards of so many arguments – especially when you consider that by the mid-1970s there had already been decades of iconic motorcycles. Still, the BMW R90s was a milestone motorcycle – and not just for BMW.

So what is the big deal about the R90s? Why consider this a “superbike” that ranks alongside other highwater mark bikes across performance eras? Simply because British rider Reg Pridmore, mounted on a BMW R90s, won the first US AMA Superbike championship in 1976. That, my friends, is some serious racetrack credentials. It doesn’t hurt that the bike – penned under the eye of legendary designer Hans Muth (think BMW R100RS, BWM R65LS, Suzuki Katana and XN85 Turbo) – has the classic proportions of style and speed.

From the seller:
You are bidding on a 1976 BMW R90S that was fully restored in 2007. Currently there are 4,890 miles on the odometer since restoration. The original mileage is unknown. The bike has all new paint including frame powder coating and hand pin stripping (painted tank, fenders and fairing). Many new parts were used in this restoration including: wind screen, cylinders, pistons, valves and seats, transmission, seat, battery, tires, brake master cylinder, mufflers (one with a small dent) dyna electronic ignition and six pages of hardware and carburetor rebuild components. No expense was spared to make it right. Over $5,000 in parts alone were used. We are moving and going back to school out of state and need to liquidate some of our assets. As you can see by the mileage, this asset isn’t used very often.

This was the last year of R90S and this model has many improvements over the previous year models. The engine is designated 247/76. There were 1,260 1976 R90S units produced for the US. You can read more about this model in Ian Falloon’s book “BMW R90S” of the Motorcycle Collector Series. This is the BMW model that Reg Pridmore won the Daytona Superbike race in 1976. Thus the color name “Daytona Orange”. This bike is a piece of history for someone who values motorcycle history and BMW’s advanced engineering. The R90S is still a great riding motorcycle today. Need I say it runs like a new!

The R90s is powered by a 900cc opposed twin, known in BWM circles as an “airhead” (later generation BWM engines featured oil-cooled cylinder heads, and were thusly known as “oilheads”). There were three distinct generations of the R90s, starting with the original in 1973. By 1976 the party was all over – thus this beautiful orange model represents the last variant of this incredible bike.

If you can get over the orange cream popsicle color – which is one of the most striking colors available on the bike – this is one sharp looking R90s. There were less than 5,000 units of the final 1976 variant produced, so numbers are definitely in the collector’s favor. In addition, with 1976 being the year of Reg Pridmore’s historic championship win, the model year for this bike is significant.

The seller does a great job of outlining the bike, the overall features, and the condition. This auction is going on right now, and represents a great chance to own a classic BMW. For more information on this bike, click the link and jump over to the auction. Good Luck!

MI