Tagged: Moto Guzzi

Honorably Discharged: Ex-Military1955 Moto Guzzi Airone for Sale

1955 Moto Guzzi Airone L Side

For collectors and modern motorcyclists, the phrase “Italian motorcycle” conjures up images of sleek, exotic, motorcycles with shrieking engines and fragile beauty. But in the aftermath of World War II, there was a real need for cheap, reliable commuter motorcycles and Moto Guzzi, like many other manufacturers of the period, were there to provide practical transportation with the inevitable dash of Italian flair.

1955 Moto Guzzi Airone Engine

Moto Guzzis of the period were often named after birds, and the Airone or “Heron” makes for a great vintage ride today, with reliability and a broad spread of power from the 250cc four-stroke single that was surprisingly smooth, owing to the significant mass of the striking externally-mounted flywheel. Introduced in 1939 and produced until 1957, it’s also an incredibly long-lived model.

1955 Moto Guzzi Airone Bars

Famous for their reliability, many Guzzis were also used in police and military applications, and this particular bike appears to be one such machine.

From the original eBay listing: 1955 Moto Guzzi Airone for Sale

Very rare and well sorted 1955 Moto Guzzi Airone military model. This is a wonderful 250cc 4-stroke single-cylinder classic Italian motorcycle. It starts easily, idles well and runs strong.

This particular machine is totally stock, original and correct (including the military items – leg guards, luggage rack and more – which I have taken off but will go with the motorcycle to a new owner) other than the Mikuni carb and pod air filter, new battery, and replacement tires.

A few years ago, after a long search for an Airone, I purchased this machine out of long term storage. I spent time and money going through it mechanically – while leaving as much of the original cosmetics as possible – to get it to run well. I replaced the broken Dellorto carb with a new properly jetted Mikuni and sorted out the electrics and charging system. 

It is possible this is only Moto Guzzi military Airone in America – making it an unusual machine for collector or rider.

I replaced the badly damaged muffler with a correct one that looks right on this bike, installed a new clutch throwout bearing, a new battery and rewired the magneto kill switch to a small button on the handlebars. I added an in-line oil shut off valve to eliminate the notorious sumping issue. 

I unbolted the unnecessary military parts from the motorcycle to lesser the weight so I could compete with it in the Moto Giro USA, where it was a strong competitor. 

This classic Italian sport/touring machine features Clubman handlebars and Tomasselli-style levers (front brake and clutch) matched tool boxes and a handy center stand. Good usable tires with little wear, good battery, good charging system, light work, horn works, suspension works. 

1955 Moto Guzzi Airone Rear Suspension

Although these were relatively popular in Europe, very few made their way to the US, likely owing to the American proclivity for big-displacement vehicles suitable for crossing wide-open spaces. Ex-military machines can be a bit of a gamble, often having led hard lives. But Guzzi’s rugged construction is a definite asset here, and I really like the matte green paint and practical look of this bike.

-tad

1955 Moto Guzzi Airone R Side

Italian Thunder: 1977 Moto Guzzi Le Mans for Sale

1977 Moto Guzzi Le Mans R Side

The Le Mans, Moto Guzzi’s famous 1970’s superbike, was an evolution of their earlier V7 Sport, with restyled bodywork and a bigger engine. Introduced in 1976 to keep pace with competition heating up between Europe and Japan, the Le Mans featured the same Lino Tonti designed frame, but saw the engine punched out to 850cc’s. Chrome-lined cylinders, high-compression pistons and other standard hot-rod tricks gave 71hp at the rear wheel and a top speed of 130. While not the fastest bike of the period, it was rock-solid and stable, and could keep that speed up all day long.

1977 Moto Guzzi Le Mans Engine

Built around an unlikely powertrain that included shaft drive and a longitudinally mounted v-twin, Guzzi’s sportbikes still performed well and are famous for their durability: the two-valve, pushrod engines are easy to work on if you’re so inclined, but are oil-tight and very robust.

1977 Moto Guzzi Le Mans Dash

From the original eBay listing: 1977 Moto Guzzi 850 Le Mans for Sale

6800 miles! All original except electronic ignition and Corbin seat, have original seat, still in pretty good shape. See pic. Paint is mostly good with small nicks and chips from 30plus years of life. Small scrape on front ferring. See pic.  I bought another ferring that was supposed to be “excellent”. Isn’t even fair. Will go with bike if you want it. I put on new throttle cables and foot rubbers a couple of years ago. Changed oil over winter. Runs and rides like it should. Might need a battery, its about 3 yrs old and sounds a little week. Your welcome to come see before you bid.

1977 Moto Guzzi Le Mans Rear

As you can see, there’s a small amount of surface rust on the front rotors, a few dings here and there, and that comfortable, if not original Corbin seat. Note that the seller does have the original seat. Interestingly, these seats are made of a closed-cell foam that did not hold up well to hard use, and few have survived from new. The bike also includes that ugly, but unfortunately original, US headlight ring that projects beyond the surface of the bikini fairing. It’d be my first order of business to fit a replica Euro-styled piece if this were mine.

Bidding is very active and the reserve has been met. It seems like, just a few years ago, these were selling regularly for $6,000 or so. This one is headed north of $10,000 with several days to go. Aside from a few minor cosmetic flaws, this looks to be a solid example of an iconic and very practical Italian sportbike.

-tad

1977 Moto Guzzi Le Mans L Side

Little Starling: 1967 Moto Guzzi Stornello Sport for Sale

1967 Moto Guzzi Stornello Sport R Side

Characterful little bikes like this don’t really exist anymore: today, 125’s and 250’s are starter bikes and commuters, designed to offer maximum value and a dash of style and color. But under the skin, they’re designed and built as cheaply as possible, and often look pretty nasty if you look too closely.

1967 Moto Guzzi Stornello Sport Dash

Make no mistake, the Stornello or “Starling” in Italian, was designed to be built cheaply, but, like many small Italian bikes of the 50’s and 60’s, although designed as practical, affordable transportation, still managed to infuse some style, class, and quality.

1967 Moto Guzzi Stornello Sport Seat

Equipped with lower bars, a racing seat [here replaced with a solo saddle], cut-down fenders, lightweight wheels, and increased fuel capacity, the Sport version of the little Stornello produced a bit more power than stock, a thundering 8hp from the 123cc motor. That may not sound like much, but the long-stroke, undersquare engine made good torque in the best Guzzi tradition.

1967 Moto Guzzi Stornello Sport Engine

From the original eBay listing: 1967 Moto Guzzi Stornello 125 Sport for Sale

All original accept horn and rear view mirror. Finish and all body parts with original patina clear coated. All mechanical components completely gone through. Engine: complete rebuild including Valve guides, valves, piston, rings, sleeve honed, new wrist pin, new kick start return spring, complete gasket set, cases buffed and detailed. Motor starts on first kick every time, all electronics work. Aftermarket turn signals added for safety. Tires are ok and original. Single saddle is correct and original from Italy but original American long seat is included. Not many of these in the US and this one turns heads. Current Indiana Title, plated

Condition: All original as found in barn, completely disassembled cleaned and assembled with original barn rust spots, all fender and case rust was treated and clear coated to preserve the look. Tank perfect, no rust, no clear coat. Italian seat and parcel rack has been added but original large seat is included. New wiring harness, lights and turn signals added for safety, original 6 volt system. Engine complete top to bottom rebuild, piston, rings, wrist pin, value guides, valves, kick start return spring and carb. Cases and cylinder buffed and detailed. Exhaust original all the way back. I am the second owner, found this bike in a barn in Ohio where it had been sitting for the past 20 years

1967 Moto Guzzi Stornello Sport Front

With a “Buy It Now” price of $3,000 for such a sweet little piece of history, although those turn signals would have to go: a nice set of small, black LED signals would do the same job, draw less current, and be far more subtle than the bits currently fitted. A very cool bike for a pretty low price.

-tad

1967 Moto Guzzi Stornello Sport L Side

Big Green Race Bike: 1973 Moto Guzzi V7 Sport Racer

1973 Moto Guzzi V7 Race Bike R Side

Up today is a very beautiful and functional Moto Guzzi V7 Sport race bike that’s seen some success on track in recent years. There’ve been quite a few vintage racers coming up for sale recently, but none that had me as excited as this one. I’m surprised I’ve never actually seen a vintage race Guzzi at the events I’ve attended, considering the variety of marques generally represented. Maybe they just make such good roadbikes, owners can’t bear to convert them for track use…

1973 Moto Guzzi V7 Race Bike L Side Front

In spite of the shaft drive, Guzzis are relatively light and handle very well, make good power, and are fundamentally very durable. This example features a wealth of race goodies, including a big-bore motor, straight-cut gearbox, and flat-slide carbs. It’s also safety wired up and is about as green as it’s possible for a bike to be, with hints of the red, Telaio Rosso-styled frame peeking out from underneath the vivid bodywork.

1973 Moto Guzzi V7 Race Bike Dash

From the original eBay listing: 1973 Moto Guzzi V7 Sport Racer for Sale

model year 1973
This is a bike very well known in Italy, it costed a fortune to build and was on podium, 2nd, at the 1997 Daytona classic series with a max speed of 256 kms/h!
Specs are massive: 980cc Scola engine, straight cut gearbox, Kehin CR carbs, ultrarare 38mm Marzocchi magnesium forks, steering head modifided to adjust the rake, etc.
Race and collect!
Bulletproof investment.
Bike is currently located in Italy, 33080 Roveredo in Piano (Pordenone) but i can get them delivered all around the World at cost, no problem.
We can supply US contact as reference.

If you don’t feel like doing the math on this one, 256kph is just a whisker under 160mph, a pretty serious turn of speed for an air-cooled, pushrod v-twin with a design from the 1960’s and barn-door aerodynamics, albeit updated with a bigger displacement.

1973 Moto Guzzi V7 Race Bike Engine

There is plenty of time left on the auction, and the reserve has not yet been met. No surprise, considering how rare and nicely prepared this is. Obviously, the originality of the V7 Sport has been sort of destroyed, but it’s been transformed into something truly one-of-a-kind and would make a really cool vintage race bike if you’re not afraid to wreck something this singular, a great attention-grabber for shows, or the coolest living room decoration of all time.

1973 Moto Guzzi V7 Race Bike Rear Wheel

It’s very easy to make fake V7 Sports, so if you’re looking at this as a collectable, make sure you do some homework before bidding. Fakes may look, feel, and perform like the originals, but don’t offer quite the same investment potential…

-tad

1973 Moto Guzzi V7 Race Bike L Side

Supercharged 1938 Moto Guzzi PE250 Stanley Woods Replica

1938 Moto Guzzi PE250 L Rear

Now this is a race-replica! No mere paint, decal, and clip-on conversion here, the seller has put some serious money into a vintage machine, fitting a supercharger to an early horizontal-single Moto Guzzi PE250. Most of the early Guzzi’s I’ve seen for sale have plenty of vintage patina, but this one looks better than factory fresh, with some hot-rod touches I’ve never seen applied to a vintage Guzzi.

1938 Moto Guzzi PE250 L Side Front

Although current owners over at Piaggio have cast Moto Guzzi as their line of retro-riffic cruisers and neoclassic sporty machines that appeal to born-again-bikers and riders “of a certain age,” it’s important to remember their rich racing history, and this bike harkens back to that era, when Guzzi’s raced on the world stage and won.

1938 Moto Guzzi PE250 Dash

Prior to the introduction of their iconic v-twin in the 1960’s, Guzzi’s successes were based around variations on their “horizontal single” theme. Singles were ubiquitous during the period, when simplicity equaled reliability and light weight in the motorcycling world. Guzzi laid their engine over on its side to keep the center of gravity as low as possible and stick the cylinder head out into the cooling breeze, although I do wonder about their insistence on exposed valvesprings with the head so vulnerable to debris and road grit… Their distinctive exposed flywheel was a better idea, and allowed them to keep the weight of the engine low, since the cases didn’t need to actually enclose the spinning mass of flywheel itself.

1938 Moto Guzzi PE250 R Engine2

This configuration worked well on both road and track: the same simplicity that meant reliable, torquey race bikes made for durable, long-legged and easy-to-ride transportation during an era when ordinary people were just getting used to the idea of personal mobility. And later, the configuration meant for reliable transportation for a country reeling from the devastation of war.

1938 Moto Guzzi PE250 L Side Front

From the original eBay listing: Supercharged 1938 Moto Guzzi PE250 Stanley Woods Replica

This is a replica of Stanley Woods 1938 Moto Guzzi 250 Supercharged.

We fired it up 4 months ago and it had a problem with being too large for the Supercharger. I gave up at that point and fitted the stock setup without the supercharger. I have all the parts for the Supercharger if you wish to fit it again. 

Much work has gone into the engine for use with the Supercharger. Feel free to call me and I can better detail these for you. ph.360-387-5038.

I have over $30K invested in the bike. Some special features are: alloy fuel and oil tank, front and rear fender alloy, alloy wheels, alloy brake and shift assy, Special light weight suspension springs and alloy bellypan for them and custom leather seat and pillion. Much more…

1938 Moto Guzzi PE250 SuperCharger

There is still plenty of time left on the listing, and the Buy It Now is set at $26,000. The seller mentions that there were some teething problems with the blower and it’s currently not fitted to the bike. Never thought I’d actually be typing “blower,” writing for this site… I’m not sure what “a problem with being too large for the supercharger” means exactly or what running problems that issue caused. But it sounds like it was built with supercharging in mind, so if I had the money to buy this bike, I’d definitely be sorting that out!

A vintage 250 single with a supercharger? Sign me up!

-tad

1938 Moto Guzzi PE250 R Front

Munch Miles in Style: 1984 Moto Guzzi Lemans III

1984 Moto Guzzi LeMans III R Side

Guzzi’s LeMans III was the first Italian bike I fell in love with, a fake LeMans I someone made out of a III with the fairings stripped off and a simple, round headlight fitted. The square cylinder heads would be obvious to me now, but I still wouldn’t care: the low stance allowed by the Tonti frame makes it one of the coolest café-styled bikes out there, without compromising useability. It’s fast, reliable, tuneable, and makes an amazing noise.

1984 Moto Guzzi LeMans III L Engine Detail

Produced between 1981 and 1984, the LeMans III was a more thorough overhaul of the bike than the CX100 and featured a restyled cylinder head design and revised internals, along with the distinctive angular styling. In typical 1980’s era emissions-reducing form, compression was reduced, but vastly improved quality control at the factory actually improved performance, and the lower-compression engine made more torque than the older version.

1984 Moto Guzzi LeMans III Dash

And I always have to point out: see that little button underneath the row of idiot lights? That’s actually the key: it looks like a normal flat key in your pocket,but it folds as you see in the picture so you can slot it into the dash, and then you twist. Cool right? Just make sure you don’t loose it, since I’m not sure replacements are available…

From the original eBay listing: 1984 Moto Guzzi LeMans III for Sale

I’ve owned this bike for 15 years.  It is solid and requires minimal attention.  It’s a GUZZI!  And a very, very good one.  I would not hesitate to head across the continent on this machine.  It has had all the right upgrades and runs EXTREMELY well.  Bike has no “issues” and is not a refurb.  This bike has always been on the road and excellently maintained.

Dyna electronic ignition, Dyna coils
Dellorto 40MM pumper carbs, Delran manifolds, Heads have been flowed
Bub head pipes, Lafranconi Competizione Wizzer mufflers
Heavy valve springs, Chrome Moly push rods (Raceco), Augustini cam
Lightened flywheel, Harpers outsider oil filter kit, Steel braided brake lines
Marzochi 38MM fork assembly, Tarozzi adjustable clip-ons, Fork brace, Koni adjustable shocks
Gaman seat, Euro Motoelectrics starter,  U-joints replaced, Front brake rotors and calipers replaced with new.
Lots of original parts included.

Note: Lemans III chin fairing is included.  I have it off the bike because I think it looks better without.

1984 Moto Guzzi LeMans III Front

Like so many Guzzis, this one isn’t strictly stock, but the modifications are thoughtful, subtle, and should improve the overall package. Also: the noise those cannon-like Lafronconi pipes make should be pretty epic. Mileage is at 55,000 although Guzzis are built to go the distance and this appears to have been very well maintained. The III is definitely not the most desirable of the LeMans bikes, but prices are on the rise: there are just two days left on the auction and bidding is at about $5,000 with the reserve not yet met.

-tad

1984 Moto Guzzi LeMans III L Side

1937 Moto Guzzi PE 238 for Sale

1937Moto Guzzi PE238 L Side

At the dawn of time, back before Honda made multis for the masses, the single was the epitome of motorcycling perfection. Certainly other companies did make twins and exotic four-cylinders, but the big single provided the ideal motorcycling powerplant: simple and compact, with a torque-rich powerband that made for ease-of-use on the road and flexibility on the racetrack.

Moto Guzzi was almost exclusively associated with this configuration for the first forty years of production, until the introduction of their iconic v-twin in the 1960s. Their distinctive “horizontal” singles kept weight almost impossibly low and provided excellent access to cooling airflow for the head as can be seen in this Moto Guzzi PE238.

1937Moto Guzzi PE238 L Side Engine

Along with that distinctive laid-over engine, Guzzis of this era were notable for their exposed, “salami-slicer” flywheels. This configuration allowed Guzzi to keep the weight of their engine castings down, since they didn’t actually have to enclose the relatively large, heavy flywheel that smoothed power-pulses and provided locomotive-style torque! Valves on this smaller, 250cc example were operated by exposed, “hairpin” valve springs that can be seen in the photo above.

1937Moto Guzzi PE238 Cockpit

And while “Italian” has come to be synonymous with the “expensive,” “exotic,” and “temperamental,” it’s important to remember that, in the post-war era, manufacturers were primarily concerned with getting the population to work on time. Most Italian bikes of the era were designed to function as transportation, not as expensive lifestyle-accessories and, while Moto Guzzi was very active in competition, their bikes were famously reliable, frugal, and flexible.

1937Moto Guzzi PE238 R Side Engine

From the original eBay listing: 1937 Moto Guzzi PE238 for Sale

This is a very nice example of an older restoration in italy.  Recently imported to the states.  A few scratches on the tank decal.  Paint chips in rear fender, but otherwise looks nice.  Unknown running condition, but I have imported bikes from this dealer and will need some going through, but otherwise will likely run.  Super neat and rare bike.

Bidding is active on this bike, but is only up to $6,200 with the reserve not met and five days left on the auction. While a bike like this is certainly not “entry level” classic by any means, and performance of a 1930’s 250 is certainly not up to modern levels, old Guzzis are famous for their usability making this pretty practical for its vintage.

That torquey single is famous for being able to lug from single-digit speeds in top gear so, allowing for the ultimate limits of the power and braking, these old Guzzis can be used on the road, and I’m sure any classic road rally or event would be ecstatic to have something like this in attendance!

-tad

1937Moto Guzzi PE238 R Side

 

 

 

Best of Both Worlds: 1984 Moto Guzzi LeMans Cafe

1984 Moto Guzzi LeMans Cafe L Side

When is a vintage Guzzi not really a vintage Guzzi? When it’s a combination of the old and the new, like this Moto Guzzi LeMans café bike. The relatively slow pace of development among many smaller manufacturers is at times very frustrating, and bikes at the end of a glacially slow production cycle can seem like dinosaurs.

1984 Moto Guzzi LeMans Cafe R Side Rear

But that same slow change can pay dividends down the road: long periods of slow improvement mean that those same dinosaurs are pretty well-developed by the time they’re finally replaced, and many updated components can be retrofitted to earlier machines, allowing a modern builder to take the best of each era and combine classic looks with improved reliability and performance.

1984 Moto Guzzi LeMans Cafe Dash

This is definitely true of the Tonti-framed Guzzis of the 70’s and 80’s, and the builder of this example has combined the classic look of the original LeMans with the updated, square-head motor from the donor LeMans III, here bored out to over 1000cc’s and fitted with twin-plug heads.

1984 Moto Guzzi LeMans Cafe L Side Engine

The word “agricultural” gets thrown around a lot with Guzzis but, in this case, that’s no bad thing: the tractor-like torque this nearly 1100cc motor should put a big smile on your face. And don’t assume that the pushrod valvetrain makes this thing a low-end-only proposition: a number of comparisons I’ve read between the LeMans and the Ducati 900SS comment on the fact that the Guzzi is actually the revvier of the two motors.

1984 Moto Guzzi LeMans Cafe Front Brakes

From the original eBay listing: 1984 Moto Guzzi LeMans Café

True cafe racer and not only in looks. This bike was built in California with little expense spared. Based on a 1984 Lemans III, Allegedly over $10k spent on the engine, 1060cc, extensive twin plug head work, reworked gear box with silky smooth shifting, heavy duty starter, Olin shocks, twin floating front discs, single floating rear, Alloy tank from the Tank Shop in Scotland, Lemans I faring and Agostini tail piece, new Mikuni slide carbs w/chokes, wire rims, open exhaust, frame powder coated, battery moved to bottom of bike for better balance. I am selling this for a friend and although I have not ridden it I have ridden with him/it and BEHIND it, which is not  a common position for me and my modified BMW R1100s. It is a very fast bike. And I think for an experienced rider, in my opinion.

1984 Moto Guzzi LeMans Cafe Shock Detail

I’m not the biggest fan of the tail section on this bike, but that could easily be changed by the new owner, and the aluminum tank makes up for it in any case. There is a very minor dent as shown in the photo, but slight imperfections are part of the charm of a part like that.

1984 Moto Guzzi LeMans Cafe Tank Detail

I’d say if this goes for anywhere near the starting price of $6,000 it’s a good deal, considering the development that’s claimed to have gone into it, although at some point I’d want to see more documentation of exactly what went into the engine build.

-tad

1984 Moto Guzzi LeMans Cafe L Side Front

Low and Lean: 1973 Moto Guzzi V7 Sport

http://ebay.com/sch/i.html?_dcat=6024&_fsrp=1&_sop=3&_nkw=(r1100s%2C+r1200s%2C+fzr%2C+ducati%2C+aprilia%2C+bimota%2C+cbr%2C+cb%2C+rc51%2C+rc45%2C+rc30%2C+vfr%2C+yzf%2C+fzr%2C+ninja%2C+rd%2C+rz%2C+rzv%2C+rg%2C+rgv%2C+rare%2C+two+stroke%2C+guzzi%2C+yamaha%2Czx%2C+zxr%2Cgsx%2C+gsxr%2C+nsr%2C+tzr+)&_sacat=6024&_from=R40&rt=nc&Model%2520Year=1977%7C1978%7C1979%7C1980%7C1981%7C1982%7C1983%7C1985%7C1986%7C1987%7C1988%7C1989%7C1990%7C1991%7C1993%7C1994%7C1995%7C1996%7C1997%7C1998%7C1999%7C2000%7C2001%7C2002%7C2003%7C2004%7C2005&LH_TitleDesc=0&Make=Aprilia%7CBenelli%7CBimota%7CBMW%7CBuell%7CDucati%7CHonda%7CMoto%2520Guzzi%7CMV%2520Agusta%7COther%2520Makes%7CSuzuki%7CYamaha&mkcid=1&mkrid=711-53200-19255-0&siteid=0&campid=5336355465&toolid=20008&mkevt=1&MBDACmisc=VSUIbu

1973 Moto Guzzi V7 Sport Green L Side

To me, old Moto Guzzis like this V7 Sport are just about the perfect vintage bikes: they’re rare, but parts are available to keep them running. The styling is classic, but they’re relatively reliable, and dead-simple to work on. Construction is rugged and durable, but the bikes are still sporty and agile compared to their contemporaries. They’re sportbikes, yet can actually rack up miles, since they’re not highly-strung or fragile. And the innovative frame design by Lino Tonti that allowed the engine to be set low for handling and cornering clearance, also just happens to make for the lowest, meanest-looking bike of the period.

1973 Moto Guzzi V7 Sport Green R Side Detail

Although some very odd folks have occasionally been known to race the earlier “loop-framed” Guzzis, they were primarily sport-touring machines, and Guzzi wanted a piece of that “win on Sunday, sell on Monday” pie, so they needed something with a bit more handling. They knew the powertrain would do the job, but the frame of the V700 was just too tall to be competitive in racing.

1973 Moto Guzzi V7 Sport Green Dash

So Lino Tonti designed a very low frame with detachable bottom rails to improve handling, the engine was punched out from 703cc’s to 748 to slip in under the 750cc limit for racing, and a 5-speed gearbox was fitted. The generator was moved from the top of the engine to the front and replaced with a compact Bosch alternator, freeing up room for the frame top rails. A huge front drum was fitted and adjustable “swan-neck” clip on bars allowed the ergonomics to be tailored to suit the rider’s mood.

1973 Moto Guzzi V7 Sport Green Rear Wheel

From the original eBay listing: 1973 Moto Guzzi V7 Sport for Sale

Mostly Original Great Vintage Motorcycle 24592 miles!

This is a very close to original bike, although recently repainted.  Has been stored indoors, as a collector on display, for many years.  If you want this one to run, it would need to be gone through, battery, etc.  But otherwise you can leave dry and add to your collection.  

Due to the misplacement of a single box during the painting, the gas cap box locks and pet cock are not included.  If/when that box is found, those items will be included.  Please see the photos and let us know if you need any more.

The original run of Telaio Rosso [“red frame”] bikes were basically hand-built, with details not found on later bikes, including sand-cast engine cases. And while those few bikes represent the Holy Grail for Guzzi fans, the production V7 Sport was made in enough numbers to make them a realistic goal. Prices have more than doubled in the past ten years, but they’re still relatively affordable and very usable bikes, with plenty of replacement parts.

1973 Moto Guzzi V7 Sport Green Front Wheel

As always, it’s especially important to do your research before plunking down cash on a V7 Sport: the Tonti frame was in production for more than 30 years, and tanks, fenders, bars, and exhausts are all available, so many replicas exist.

-tad

1973 Moto Guzzi V7 Sport Green R Side Detail2

 

1954 Moto Guzzi Falcone for Sale

1954 Moto Guzzi Falcone R Side

If you’re only cursorily familiar with Moto Guzzi, it’s likely you associate them primarily with their iconic v-twin, which is odd, considering that, for so much of their history is steeped in the big, thumping singles like this Moto Guzzi Falcone.

Motorcycle manufacturers become victims of their own success: introduce a successful model, and you’re forever trapped in that mould, forced to include features, technologies, or a specific engine configuration long after it is useless as anything other than a character trait.

And forget the truth of history: most buyers have some vague idea of “heritage” but don’t really know all that much about the marques they’ve chosen as extensions of themselves: Italian bike buyers have so long had to justify the higher prices their machines commanded and their perceived unreliability, that they’re surprisingly conservative when it comes to change, and you risk upsetting the apple cart if you, say, radically restyle your iconic superbike, even if the actual machine performs better in almost every way.

When Moto Guzzi was working on a modern superbike back in the 90’s, the designs that were leaked featured modern, four-valve heads, liquid cooling… and a v-twin with a longitudinal crankshaft. Yeah, it was going to be 75° instead of the traditional 90° and it was going to feature chain drive to the rear wheel. But the main goal in choosing that configuration seemed to have been to keep the machine recognizably Guzzi, rather than for any real performance benefit.

1954 Moto Guzzi Falcone Dash1954 Moto Guzzi Falcone Rear

Produced from 1950 to 1963, the Falcone, or “Hawk” in Italian, followed Guzzi’s bird-name convention of the period. It featured telescopic forks and their famous “horizontal” single that allowed for good access to cooling airflow and a low center of gravity. The distinctive exposed flywheel kept engine castings light and compact, since they didn’t actually have to surround the spinning mass, while the flywheel itself remained heavy enough to smooth out the juddering power pulses of the big single and helped the bike pull cleanly from low revs. The low center of gravity made for excellent handling and the machine was famed for its smoothness, durability, simplicity, and high-quality construction.

From the original eBay listing: 1954 Moto Guzzi Falcone for Sale

For auction is my 1954 Falcone. This bike is a beautiful restored motorcycle about 13 years on the restoration. It has been garaged and covered with an occasional ride a couple times a year. It starts on the first kick. 3 days ago I took the pics and a running video that I can send you if interested. On start up the fuel petcocks were dripping. I drove it 5 miles and when I returned It had a bit of oil mist on the back fender. It did have a oil drip. It shifts and drives excellent. I have put around 100 miles on this bike during my ownership driving to local shows and meets.  It takes the show as the chrome work is flawless.  This motorcycle will be a very nice addition to any collection.

1954 Moto Guzzi Falcone L Front1954 Moto Guzzi Falcone R Rear

This one is not quite perfect perhaps, with a couple fluid drips but, looking at the miles, it’s clear that just means it actually gets ridden. There’s a pretty active community that adores these bikes, and parts are available to keep them running. And run they do: designed with locomotive torque in mind, they will basically pull from a walking pace in top gear with the engine turning over so slowly you can literally count the combustion events. Plus there’s the always amusing benefit of having your left boot tip polished to a mirror sheen by that exposed flywheel…

-tad