Tagged: shaft-drive

Jack-Of-All-Trades: 1975 BMW R75/6 for Sale

1975 BMW R75 L Side

Bikes like BMW’s R75/6 represent a much more do-it-all imagining of the sportbike, before race-bred ergonomics and peaky powerplants made them impossibly focused and of far more limited utility than they are today. And although BMW’s have, until the S1000RR, reveled in a sort of “older gentleman’s express” image, they’ve always been able to get a wiggle on when asked, although it was often suggested that you phone ahead if you needed any significant braking done…

1975 BMW R75 L Side Cockpit

But it’s important to remember that part of BMW’s continued success was their early realization that the future of motorcycles was exactly in that upmarket trend away from practical transportation, and they adjusted their product to match that need. And then, instead of chasing every new styling and technological trend through the 70’s and 80’s, they became more than just motorcycles. They were BMW’s.

Introduced in 1974, the /6 models featured a front disc brake and an interesting master cylinder that was tucked under the tank to provide protection during a crash that was operated via a short cable. The 749cc engine was basically a bored-out version of the smaller bikes’ “airhead” flat twin units and gave 50hp with a top speed of 110mph.

1975 BMW R75 R Side Engine

From the original eBay listing: 1975 BMW R75/6 for Sale

The bike is in amazing condition but it is over 30 years old. I has a scratch on the tank. The tach needs to be replaced. Otherwise the bike is in great condition! But please ask any questions and I’m happy to answer in detail or get a picture. There are basic nicks that just occur with time but nothing major other. The ones on the tank are the most noticeable.

This has been my 2nd rider in Brooklyn for over 5 or 6 years.  It was rebuilt and purchase from AutoBahn Kraftwerks who are AMAZING at what they do.  The bike has been routinely maintained in Brooklyn by Peter at Moto Bogataro, I’ve owned a few airheads and he is the best mechanic I’ve ever worked with.  Love, care, passion and pure knowledge. 

It has been stored in my garage and never kept outdoors.  It starts on first click unless of course it’s really cold then it may take one or two extra.  

It needs a little bit of a wash, I will do it this weekend actually and have it detailed.  🙂  There is no rust AT ALL, that mud is just a puddle I ran over comes right off!!!  Will update photos if I can in time. 

The engine is super powerful, responsive, such a blast to drive, great weight balance, comfortable, and just a pleasure even two up. 

Most of the work was done by AutoBahn but I did update the rear shocks, have new tires, worked on brakes, maintained oil change schedule.  An s-fairing could be added to it, all hook up are on the bike. 

I am selling it because I no longer have my apartment with the parking space in 2 months and cannot afford to pay for an indoor lot for two bikes. 

 

1975 BMW R75 L Side Tank

I am familiar with Moto Bogataro, one of the shops he mentions in Brooklyn. They do have an excellent reputation and do lots of work on old Laverdas and Guzzis as well.

This particular bike doesn’t show all that well in the pictures, but the seller claims it just needs a bit of cosmetic TLC. I do believe him that it’s just mud spatters showing on the pipe and not rust, as the same material is obviously there on the seat as well. But the front tire is also looking pretty low and I’m not sure why you wouldn’t take a moment to correct those issues before photographing your bike for sale on eBay. With a Buy-It-Now price of $5,700 it’s not exactly cheap, but you’re looking at what appears to be a very solid example of an extremely classic sport motorcycle.

-tad

1975 BMW R75 Cockpit

The Very Definition of Exotic: 1971 MV Agusta 750 Sport 4C75 for Sale

1971 MV Agusta 750 Sport L Front

MV Agusta’s racing heritage is at the heart of their fame and, for a long time, their exotic, multi-cylinder engines were available only to factory racers. So when they finally produced a roadgoing four-cylinder motorcycle, expectations were pretty high. Unfortunately, the 600 that was released was hideously ugly, massively underpowered, and hobbled by a heavy shaft in place of the usual chain-drive.

1971 MV Agusta 750 Sport R Rear

The later 750 corrected two of the three problems, keeping the shaft drive that was supposedly a measure to prevent privateers from simply buying a bike off the showroom floor and racing against the factory machines. None of MV Agusta’s four-cylinder roadbikes can really be considered serious sportbikes: they’re just too heavy. But they’re gorgeous, make expensive shrieking noises from the four-into-four exhaust and cam gears, are extremely rare, and handle well enough for owners to take them out for the occasional canyon ride.

1971 MV Agusta 750 Sport Dash

While the red, white, and blue colors might be garish and tacky on another bike, they work really well here. The simple metal dash is very elegant, with just a central ignition key and I also love that the clocks have such similar markings: the tach reads to 120 and the speedo to 150, which probably looks pretty cool when you’re winding it out in top gear…

1971 MV Agusta 750 Sport Clocks

From the original eBay listing: 1971 MV Agusta 750 Sport 4C75 for Sale

FRAME: MV4C75214054

ENGINE: 214-047

EXTREMELY RARE, HISTORIC, IMMACULATE.

Motorcycle is located in a temperature controlled facility in Port Huron, MI.

Purchase includes Factory Sealed Promotional poster. 

1971 MV Agusta 750 Sport L Rear

While I fully respect that sellers of rare and exotic machinery expect that buyers already know the general history a bike before they drop more than $115,000 on a motorcycle, a bit more history about this particular example might be in order here. Maintenance, updates, personal experiences? Has the owner ridden it? It’s an old motorcycle, so does it have any quirks or interesting characteristics? And what’s the story with that fairing? Is it original?

There’s less than a day left on this auction, so you’d better move quickly if you happen to have an extra $100k or so burning a hole in your pocket and an MV-sized hole in your collection, your bike is waiting!

-tad

1971 MV Agusta 750 Sport L Front Fairing

US Market Beemer: 1969 BMW R69US for Sale

1969 BMW R69US L Side

While BMW certainly made conservatively-styled, even stodgy-looking bikes they were, much like the majority of BMW’s modern offerings, “gentleman’s express” sportbikes. Powered by a 594cc version of their classic “flat” twin and shaft drive that could push the bike just north of “the ton” and cruise at 90mph all day long, the R69S was the ideal motorcycle for wide-open spaces and it was correspondingly popular in the US.

1969 BMW R69US Clocks

That popularity in the US market actually led to the specific model you see here. While the standard R69S used Earles forks that had advantages over early telescopic forks in terms of performance under braking, but were relatively heavy, the “US” versions featured telescopic forks instead of BMW’s more typical Earles forks, and deleted the sidecar mounting lugs.

Although this change was designed to modernize the looks of the bike and appeal to the US market, the change worked well and even saved a bit of weight compared to the Earles fork models.

1969 BMW R69US L Side Rear

From the original eBay listing: 1969 BMW R69US for Sale

I am selling this outstanding bike for a long-time friend; an internationally established collector of rare BMW motorcycles.  This R69US is completely restored to near perfect in Granada Red.  The bike will bring you years of pleasure whether for show, riding or just its investment value.

As always I reserve the right to end this auction early as the bike is for sale in other venues and may sell before this auction ends, so bid your highest price early.  This bike is located in Blackhawk California.

1969 BMW R69US Engine

The styling of the R69 is conservative, but these look great in bright red, rather than the conservative BMW black, and I’m a huge fan of bar-end turn signals. At $15,000 with no takers as yet, this may be a bit rich, although you certainly would be hard-pressed to find a more polished vintage bike in terms of both looks and riding experience.

-tad

1969 BMW R69US R Side

Iconic: 1978 MV Agusta 750S America

1978 MV Agusta 750S America L Front

Bikes like the MV Agusta 750S America make absolutely no sense on a performance-per-dollar basis. It’s the kind of motorcycle that today would have riders scoffing that they “could buy four GSX-R1000’s for that price…” But that’s obviously missing the point. MV Agusta’s raison d’être was always racing, and their road bikes of the era seemed designed deliberately not to sell: the original 600 was heavy, slow and, worst of all, it was ugly as sin. The 750 that followed was at least a handsome bike, but was burdened with a strange feature not generally found on sportbikes: shaft drive. Rumor has it that MV Agusta didn’t want their factory race teams to be challenged by privateers and fitted the heavy system to hobble them. Magni made a chain-drive conversion for the 750S, but most owners have kept them relatively stock.

1978 MV Agusta 750S America R Front Final

And honestly, there really wasn’t much to improve anyway, aside from that 560lb wet weight. They were compact and handling belied the bloat: on the move, the bike carried its weight well and the bike could be hustled through a set of bends. Ultimate limits weren’t racetrack-worthy, but that wasn’t really what this bike was about and with a price tag of $6000, it’s not like you’d want to push things too fast on the road anyway…

1978 MV Agusta 750S America Cockpit Final

The centerpiece, aside from the looks, fit-and-finish, and the name, was obviously that engine. Sand-cast and heavily-finned, with dual overhead cams, four cylinders, and a set of cam-timing gears in the center of the engine, it was ruggedly built, with a broad spread of power. Four-cylinder bikes are sometimes criticized for being bland and characterless, but this engine puts paid to that idea: induction, gear-whine, and the four individual exhausts combine into a complex, very expensive noise.

1978 MV Agusta 750S America Suspension Final

From the original eBay listing: 1978 MV Agusta 750S America

ONLY 1,112 Miles, original paint, excellent condition and VERY RARE. Believed to only be a 2 owner bike.

Comes with:
– 2 fairings
– 3 sets of exhaust pipes
– Original tool kit
– New battery
– Spare New Marzocchi Shocks
– Riders manual, shop manual, MV Agusta Super profile book & various related literature
– Street & Race Air Cleaners
– Brembo & OE front calipers

Clear title in hand. Bike is located in Atlanta. NO trades, No B.S. please.

1978 MV Agusta 750S America Tail

Interestingly, the 750S America is the very first MV I ever saw in the flesh. For several years, one sat in the showroom of The Garage Company in Southern California, in the days before the company’s modern incarnation and before the internet: until then, I’d been completely unaware that MV even made a roadbike at all. This is one of the rarest of the rare, an iconic bike with just 600 or so made in three years.  The seller mentions three different exhausts come with the bike, and I’d like to know if one is a set of those gorgeous, curved items generally seen in period photos… There’s just one day left on the auction, with the reserve not met, so move quickly if you happen to have a spare $76,000 burning a hole in your pocket.

-tad

1978 MV Agusta 750S America Rear Final

Munch Miles in Style: 1984 Moto Guzzi Lemans III

1984 Moto Guzzi LeMans III R Side

Guzzi’s LeMans III was the first Italian bike I fell in love with, a fake LeMans I someone made out of a III with the fairings stripped off and a simple, round headlight fitted. The square cylinder heads would be obvious to me now, but I still wouldn’t care: the low stance allowed by the Tonti frame makes it one of the coolest café-styled bikes out there, without compromising useability. It’s fast, reliable, tuneable, and makes an amazing noise.

1984 Moto Guzzi LeMans III L Engine Detail

Produced between 1981 and 1984, the LeMans III was a more thorough overhaul of the bike than the CX100 and featured a restyled cylinder head design and revised internals, along with the distinctive angular styling. In typical 1980’s era emissions-reducing form, compression was reduced, but vastly improved quality control at the factory actually improved performance, and the lower-compression engine made more torque than the older version.

1984 Moto Guzzi LeMans III Dash

And I always have to point out: see that little button underneath the row of idiot lights? That’s actually the key: it looks like a normal flat key in your pocket,but it folds as you see in the picture so you can slot it into the dash, and then you twist. Cool right? Just make sure you don’t loose it, since I’m not sure replacements are available…

From the original eBay listing: 1984 Moto Guzzi LeMans III for Sale

I’ve owned this bike for 15 years.  It is solid and requires minimal attention.  It’s a GUZZI!  And a very, very good one.  I would not hesitate to head across the continent on this machine.  It has had all the right upgrades and runs EXTREMELY well.  Bike has no “issues” and is not a refurb.  This bike has always been on the road and excellently maintained.

Dyna electronic ignition, Dyna coils
Dellorto 40MM pumper carbs, Delran manifolds, Heads have been flowed
Bub head pipes, Lafranconi Competizione Wizzer mufflers
Heavy valve springs, Chrome Moly push rods (Raceco), Augustini cam
Lightened flywheel, Harpers outsider oil filter kit, Steel braided brake lines
Marzochi 38MM fork assembly, Tarozzi adjustable clip-ons, Fork brace, Koni adjustable shocks
Gaman seat, Euro Motoelectrics starter,  U-joints replaced, Front brake rotors and calipers replaced with new.
Lots of original parts included.

Note: Lemans III chin fairing is included.  I have it off the bike because I think it looks better without.

1984 Moto Guzzi LeMans III Front

Like so many Guzzis, this one isn’t strictly stock, but the modifications are thoughtful, subtle, and should improve the overall package. Also: the noise those cannon-like Lafronconi pipes make should be pretty epic. Mileage is at 55,000 although Guzzis are built to go the distance and this appears to have been very well maintained. The III is definitely not the most desirable of the LeMans bikes, but prices are on the rise: there are just two days left on the auction and bidding is at about $5,000 with the reserve not yet met.

-tad

1984 Moto Guzzi LeMans III L Side

1975 BMW R90S for Sale

1975 BMW R90S R Rear

Earlier this week, we featured a very nice R100/7 with a bit of café style that made it look like the earlier R90S, racier sibling of the more conservative “Slashy” bikes. My new term for the R60/2, R75/5, etc bikes. Just made it up: feel free to use it.

The wonderful thing about old BMW’s is that their handling and competence is all out of proportion to the on-paper specs and unlikelyness of the powertrain combo. You’d expect them to be pretty slow and clunky, but, as Pirelli likes to tell us: “power is nothing without control.”

1975 BMW R90S L Front

Japanese bikes of the period routinely blew their European opposition into the weeds in terms of outright power, yet somehow folks kept buying and riding the European marques so often featured on this page. Probably because they lived long enough to buy new ones and all those young hotheads on their Kawasaki H1’s died at the first serious corner they came to.

And considering how uncomfortable and uncompromising the Latin racers of the period were, it’s hard to imagine you could have speed, handling, and comfort in one package: introduced in 1974, the R90S placed first and second at the very first AMA Superbike race ever held.

1975 BMW R90S Dash

From the original eBay listing: 1975 BMW R90S for Sale 

Over $ 25,000 dollar today’s money spent by its NASA Engineer owner. The major improvements include Re-engineered engine, Harden boars & pistons, and the compression is 175 PSI (instead of usual 130 PSI), Dual plugs heads with BOSCH Blue H1 performance ignition coils, DYNA electronic pointless ignition system, PRIDMORE Lighten flight wheel, PRIMORE inlet manifolds on the original DELORTO Cabs, ALPHA BET black chromed free flow 2 in to 1 muffler, BMW Oil cooler & Deep Pan, Porsche designed CPM Magnesium “6” spokes wheels with rear wheel air cooler, enforced swing arm, BMW kick start and new Odyssey Gel Battery, Front fork legs have double braced San Jose fork braces, PRIMORE Springs in the forks and top off with SAN JOSE Triple clamp. San Jose enforced supported swing arm and RENO chromed ride off stand, KRAUSA Engine wrap crush bar, Metzler tires, expensive stainless braded front brake lines. Original tool kit, keys and owner manual are included.

The seller has helpfully included a video: BMW R90S walk-around, start up, and ride away.

1975 BMW R90S R Engine

Always happy to embrace unusual solutions, BMW mounted the R90S’ front brake master cylinder below the fuel tank and connected it to the lever via a short cable, preventing damage in the event of a crash.

It’s no garage queen, but this seems like a pretty nice example of a very collectable Bavarian bike, the choice of an intellectual rebel with a cause. I’d ditch those ridiculous “CYCLONE” stickers as soon as I could, but otherwise, this looks to be the perfect classic useable classic, combining “sport” and “touring” in equal measures.

-tad

1975 BMW R90S L Tank

 

1984 Moto Guzzi LeMans III for Sale

1984 Moto Guzzi LeMans III Red R Side

I happen to be a big fan of the 70’s and 80’s Moto Guzzi LeMans series of bikes. While the shaft-drive, pushrods, and longitudinally-mounted engine may not read like the best recipe for a true sport bike, it could handle with the best bikes of the time, made competitive power, and made an ideal roadbike.

The different versions of the LeMans were not radical redesigns, but rather gradual styling and technological evolutions of an existing platform: the famous Lino Tonti-designed frame was used on Guzzis from the early 1970’s up until just a few years ago! Unfortunately this, along with the relative availability of parts, means that it’s pretty easy to fake various LeMans models, so be careful and do your homework before buying. There’s nothing wrong with a fake in theory, unless you’ve paid for the genuine article.

Twenty years from now, I wonder if the III’s won’t be rarer than the earlier versions, since they’ve been cheap for so long and are popular choices for Mark I-style conversions and hot-rod customs. They have all the higher-spec bits and have been really undervalued until very recently.

1984 Moto Guzzi LeMans III Red L Engine

The LeMans III was produced between 1981 and 1984, so this is the final year for this style. It represented a much more significant change to the platform, compared to the LeMans II/CX100 and featured the square cylinder head style seen on Guzzis of today. And while compression was decreased slightly to meet ever-growing emissions requirements, the LeMans III actually made more torque and horsepower due to improved manufacturing tolerances careful tuning that maximized available performance.

I’m still not convinced about the styling of that fairing from the front, but it was designed in a wind tunnel, and allows that huge dash to mount that white-faced tach. And we all should know by now how I feel about big Veglia tachs… The rest of the angular design has grown on me over the past couple of years and the LeMans III’s have been increasing in value of late.

1984 Moto Guzzi LeMans III Red Dash

This one isn’t in perfect shape, but looks good and should be easy to put right any details that aren’t.

From the original eBay listing: 1984 Moto Guzzi LeMans III for Sale

 This bike sat in a barn for 15 years. Aprox. 39000 miles. I acquired it and got it running and clean up a bit. I am not a Guzzi guy so I have no interest in doing a full restoration even though it is the perfect candidate. What I have done to the bike,(Rebuilt the carbs with all new internals jets floats…, new air pods because thats what it had when I got it, throttle cables, ignition switch, glass wind shield, fuel valves/lines, spark plugs/caps/wires, new used instrument light strip, and new battery. The bike shows great and you could enjoy it as it sits or do a detailed restoration. Runs great, starts right up in freezing cold. I have horns with it but they are not hooked up. I do not know if they are original. Also have a box of parts with some type of plastic deflector, vacuum hose and starter cover. The bike seems to be all original except for the air pods but I am not an expert.

1984 Moto Guzzi LeMans III Red Tank

Ooh look: videos! http://youtu.be/tYG_ILgtmL0  ,http://youtu.be/bR4RaFwiTKY

All-in-all this is what looks like a very solid example. I actually prefer the LM III in white, but you certainly can’t go wrong with a classic red Italian sportbike.

Vintage Guzzi sportbikes really are great classic bikes. They can do big miles, handle as well as anything from the period, sound amazing, require minimal maintenance, and are a breeze to work on. With those heads sticking out in the breeze, even serious top-end work is simple, and shaft drive means you won’t need to worry about keeping a chain lubed up during nasty weather.

-tad

1984 Moto Guzzi LeMans III Red L Side