Tagged: Single

Elegant Single: 1960 Velocette MSS for Sale

1960 Velocette MSS L Side Front

It may have been built in 1960, but this Velocette MSS is, in many ways, a very nice 1930s motorcycle. A precursor to the evocatively-named Venom, the Velocette MSS was launched in 1935, although production was interrupted by the Second World War and didn’t start up again until 1954. Powered by a 495cc overhead-valve, air-cooled single with undersquare bore and stroke dimensions, the bike made 23hp and had a top speed in the neighborhood of 80mph.

1960 Velocette MSS R Side

Velocette was based in Birmingham and made high-quality motorcycles that featured innovative designs, with foot-operated gearshifts and the world’s first “positive-stop” mechanism for its four-speed box. Although earlier Velocettes did use overhead-cam engines, the MSS used simple pushrods to operate the overhead valves, but that cam was situated high in the head to keep pushrods short and the bike was otherwise of very high specification.

1960 Velocette MSS Clocks

From the original eBay listing: 1960 Velocette MSS for Sale   

Nicely restored MSS, runs good, motor strong.  Recently ridden on 125 mile BSAOCNC Gold Country Ride, in the foothills east of Sacramento.

Speedometer reads faster than actual speed, may need a different speedometer drive. Some oil leaks, could be from primary case, would be nice to sort out.   Not a show bike, a few nicks and chips in the paint, chrome not perfect.  All in all a nice bike.  All good with the electrics, headlight, taillight, horn, charging system working. Actual mileage is unknown, 1,228 currently showing on the odometer. Clear California title. Will include a copy of the owner’s handbook, good info on starting procedure.

No reserve

1960 Velocette MSS Engine

The seller also includes a short video of the bike running. There hasn’t been much activity on this auction, but bidding is up to $7,600 with very little time left. Compared to modern machines, the power is very modest, but the spread of torque is broad and these are both comfortable and very durable motorcycles, with excellent handling and there is room for performance improvement: you could probably fit some parts from the Venom if you want more speed with the subtle, stock looks.

-tad

1960 Velocette MSS L Side

Racing Replica: 1938 Moto Guzzi Condor Stradale for Sale

1938 Moto Guzzi Condor Stradale Rep R Front

Egret, Falcon, Goshawk, Bunting, Skylark, Condor… Leave it to the Italians to give their machines evocative but somehow whimsical names. And while this Moto Guzzi Condor Stradale may not have been named for the most beautiful of birds, the name is certainly apt.

1938 Moto Guzzi Condor Stradale Rep L Engine

Condors aren’t pretty, but they’re eminently practical animals, able to eat almost anything and able to stay aloft for hours, searching for their next meal. Moto Guzzi’s road and race singles of the 30s, 40s, and 50s were also very effective motorcycles, famous for their long-legged and very frugal nature. They often won races against much more powerful machinery: even racebikes could achieve 45mpg or more, and the horizontal single with its distinctive external flywheel gave impressive, long-legged torque, stable handling, and a small frontal area.

1938 Moto Guzzi Condor Stradale Rep Cockpit

The Condor was introduced in 1938 as an over-the-counter racebike and was very successful in competition, often winning races against much more powerful machinery. The “Stradale” was obviously the roadgoing version of the machine, but both road and race versions are very rare, as production was unfortunately cut short by the beginning of World War II.

1938 Moto Guzzi Condor Stradale Rep R Detail

From the original eBay listing: 1938 Moto Guzzi Condor Stradale Replica for Sale

The Condor was intended for production racing and a much more sophisticated machine than its working class brethren from Moto Guzzi.It had alloy cylinder head and barrel and magnesium (electron) crankcases along with lighter steel frame componentry, bigger brakes and wheels. They were only made for 2 years with only 69 units being produced. They were extremely successful before the outbreak of war halted competitive motorcycling. They were good for approximately 28 hp and a legitimate 100mph. Due to their rarity and the nature of their use, very few original examples exist. Seldom if ever do they become available. Offered here is a faithful recreation and tribute to one of the most remarkable manufacturers and models in history. This machine was built with no expense spared by well known Moto Guzzi authority Franco Dall’aglio in Italy. This is a magnificent machine worthy of any collection or museum. The bike could not be built for as low as its asking price due to the high level of craftsmanship and use of rare and custom reproduction race parts. An original specimen will cost approxamitely four times the figure. This motorcycle is gorgeous.

1938 Moto Guzzi Condor Stradale Rep R Detail

Obviously, this is a rare and beautiful motorcycle. But replicas are always tricky: no matter how much craftsmanship has gone into their creation, a big selling point of the real thing isn’t the actual performance or appearance, but the subjective value of a historic item and the intangible links they provide us to a bygone era. No matter how accurate a replica, it somehow isn’t the real thing. And obviously, the seller isn’t expecting real-thing-money. But with just a couple days left on the auction and no takers yet at the $30,000 starting bid, it’s obvious that potential buyers aren’t quite sure what to make of this.

It’s unfortunate, because someone has obviously gone to a lot of effort to create this roadgoing race bike replica.

-tad

1938 Moto Guzzi Condor Stradale Rep L Rear

Little Jewel: 1956 Parilla 175 Turismo Veloce for Sale

1957 Parilla 175 Tourismo R Front

Today’s machine is a very pretty little four-stroke single Parilla 175 Tourismo Veloce. Founded by Giovanni Parrilla With Two R’s in 1946 and built in his Milan workshop that specialized in diesel and injector pump repair, Parilla was a dominant force in small-displacement racing and built well-regarded road bikes until the onslaught of fast, cheap two-stroke motorcycles from Japan hit the market.

1957 Parilla 175 Tourismo L Engine

Many Parillas featured the distinctive “high-cam” engine that used short pushrods to actuate the valves actuated by a chain-driven cam just beneath the head. This kept the valvegear light for performance at higher revs and meant that the head could be removed easily without disturbing the timing. You can easily see the little rubber boots that cover the pushrods on the left-hand side of the engine. 175cc’s was as big as Parillas generally got, although the USA did naturally see a bigger 250cc version.

1957 Parilla 175 Tourismo R Tank

This example has shiny new paint and slightly more patina-d brightwork and metal, although it is overall a very elegant machine. Virtually impossible to find here in the US, this will be a labor of love, as you’ll likely spend a lot of time using GoogleTranslate to order parts from Italy…

1957 Parilla 175 Tourismo Dash

From the original eBay listing: 1956 Parilla 175 Turismo Veloce for Sale

Here for sale a very rare Parilla 175 TV Export high cams

The bike was been restored 5 years ago from the owner’s nephew. 

The bike is in very good conditions, and run very smooth.

Italian papers ready for export

1957 Parilla 175 Tourismo R Engine

Bidding is up to $7,900 at the time of writing and please note that the bike is in Italy. If you plan to run this bike on the road or in Moto Giro events, be sure to check with your local laws before your itchy mouse-finger clicks on that bright, blue “Place bid” button…

-tad

1957 Parilla 175 Tourismo L Front

Big Beautiful Single: 1957 Moto Guzzi Falcone Sport for Sale

1957 Moto Guzzi Falcone R Side

It’s been a while since we’ve posted up one of the elegantly simple Guzzi singles, so when I came across this classic Falcone, I thought it was high time we went old school. Or, well even older school… This 1957 Falcone is a pretty late version of their classic horizontal single that offered a winning combination of practicality, handling, and good looks. Gone are the earlier bikes’ exposed hairpin valves, which is a shame for the appearance, but likely a great idea for riders who plan to use their bikes: with that head so close to the ground and to the front wheel, you’ve got to figure grit and grime are a real pain for regular users. And make no mistake: these were definitely meant to be ridden.

1957 Moto Guzzi Falcone Engine

With a very low center of gravity, small frontal area, and a huge external flywheel that allowed the bike to lope along at tractor-like rpms, the Falcone was nimble, durable, flexible, and handled well. With a seemingly inadequate 23hp produced by the 500cc engine, it’s the bike’s locomotive torque that allowed the bike to lope on up to an 85mph top speed, a very respectable speed for a single-cylinder motorcycle!

1957 Moto Guzzi Falcone Headlight

This example is in excellent condition cosmetically and is obviously a runner, my very favorite kind of bike.

From the original eBay listing: 1957 Moto Guzzi Falcone Sport for Sale

Show or ride, low miles .

This bike starts easy, runs great, drives straight , stops well, looks great. Has won shows! Belonged to two very discerning  collectors G. Webster and B. Melvin. They don’t come much better than this! The price is  a bargain for the quality of the Machine. $22,000. 

The bike has been thru an extensive restoration previous to my ownership. Since I bought it I have driven it some and sorted it well. Its a beautiful show bike that you can ride to the show. I have a Large collection of bikes and have been buying them and selling them for over 50 Years. For the last 20 Years I have had an interest in owning a Moto Guzzi Falcone Sport and I have looked at a lot of them, before I found one in this condition. If there are nicer ones, they may not be for sale, because I have seen few nicer than this one. Is it perfect, probably not. Truth is I have never seen or owned that perfect dream bike. There is always something. But I think most of you will find it near that mark. There is nothing significant that I have seen wrong with it.

Oh just remembered, one of the tool box covers has a latch that sometimes doesn’t lock well. Needs an adjustment.

1957 Moto Guzzi Falcone Engine2

Oh noes! The tool box cover latch isn’t working all that well! Well forget it, then… With a $22,000 Buy it Now price, the seller is obviously asking premium money for this bike, but you’re unlikely to find an example that both looks this good and runs as well as this one is supposed to run. It’s not clear if this one’s been restored or not but, given the condition, I’ll assume it has at least been repainted.

It’s a shame that Guzzi’s current owners over at the Piaggio Group have decided that the big Italian twins will forever fill the retro niche, since Aprilia is clearly intended to be their flagship sporting brand. But that’s a shame, because Moto Guzzi has such a history making sports motorcycles, and that legacy will remain unfulfilled for the foreseeable future.

-tad

1957 Moto Guzzi Falcone L Side

 

Brooklands Bomber: 1960 BSA Gold Star for Sale

1960 BSA Gold Star R Front

In the past twenty years, we’ve gotten so used to artificially-condensed product life cycles that it’s easy to forget how durable modern machines can be. That’s one of the things that makes vintage bikes so popular: manufacturing and technology didn’t really allow for things to be as reliable as they are today, but they were built to last, and to be owned and maintained by normal people. Just look at the BSA Gold Star: built between 1938 and 1963, it had a life span that would make a Yamaha R6 blush.

1960 BSA Gold Star L Rear

Simple, reliable, and powerful, the 500cc overhead-valve single weighed under 400lbs dry and put power through a four-speed gearbox. Named for the award given to bikes that could lap the famous Brooklands circuit at over 100mph. A smaller, 350cc version was also built and both were campaigned in both on and offroad competition.

1960 BSA Gold Star R Engine

Today’s Gold Star is obviously from later in the production run, but not much changed between the 1950 and 1960 models.

From the original eBay listing: 1960 BSA Gold Star for Sale

BSA Gold Star 1960 very original and clean has been stored for years and cannot verify mileage but I would not be surprised if it is the correct mileage. Starts second kick cold and first kick warm very quiet engine no smoke sounds very tight. the front fender has some peeling chrome and the horn is missing. Pick up from Prescott AZ will help with loading if commercial carrier is used. The motorcycle is super clean and I hate to part with it as it will be very difficult to replace.

1960 BSA Gold Star R Rear

As the seller indicates, the chrome on the front fender is peeling pretty badly, but this is otherwise a very nice example. While modern instruments may be very functional, accurate, and reliable, but those Smiths clocks are works of art! And that chrome and blue tank is a combination I can’t remember seeing and is very classy.

-tad

1960 BSA Gold Star Clocks

Like a Fly Trapped in Amber: 1959 Ducati Elite for Sale

1959 Ducati Elite 200 R Side

This jewel-like Ducati Elite is more of an object d’art than a living, breathing motorcycle. Like the titular bug embedded in fossilized tree sap, the world has passed this little time capsule of a motorcycle by, leaving it perfectly preserved, but very dead.

1959 Ducati Elite 200 L Side

Which is a shame: these little Ducatis were created with the same passion as their larger siblings and were often very competitive in small-displacement racing classes. Introduced in 1958 and displacing 204cc, the Elite was light, sporty, and very sexy. With 18 flexible horses and a four-speed gearbox, it could reach almost 90mph, a pretty impressive number for such a small machine.

And even if it could barely go around corners, just look at that beautiful “jelly mould” tank and striking paint scheme! With all the retro designs Ducati has tried over the years, I’m surprised they’ve not yet tried to recapture this little darling.

1959 Ducati Elite 200 R Side Rear

From the original eBay listing: 1959 Ducati Elite for Sale

This Ducati Elite came from the incredible RM Sothebys Monaco auction of 2012, from the Carlo Salterelli Collection in conjunction with the Ducati factory. This auction was much publicized in the motorcycle press for the unprecedented scope of Salterelli’s collection from it’s earliest single cylinder Ducatis to some of it’s finest v-twin and single racers. There’s much information online which can be easily searched regarding this incredible collection and auction. After winning the auction this motorcycle was shipped to Los Angeles and placed in my office to be enjoyed as a motorcycle sculpture.

I’ve never attempted to start this bike, but it does have good compression and can select all gears with ease. I have just enjoyed it’s pleasing lines. I’ve attached the images of the catalog and I feel that the auction company’s description is apt and the accompanying photographs best describe the motorcycle better than I can.

It has minor nicks, scratches and blemishes but no major-offending issues. It is a very beautiful bike and I think the new owner will be pleased with this incredibly rare motorcycle, with the excellent provenance of coming from the Salterelli Collection (an ex-Ducati factory works racer, test rider and factory based dealer).  It would be impossible to duplicate such history and factory connections that this motorcycle has. The auction catalogs and all accompanying paperwork will be included in the bike’s sale. There is no title, but a Bill of Sale only, as it has never been registered in California.

1959 Ducati Elite 200 In Situ

These are beautiful little motorcycles and although I appreciate that some collectors have saved these for posterity, keeping them in visually perfect condition, I feel like it completely misses the point. Certainly, there are show bikes and cars meant to be barely functional metalwork confections that aren’t intended to be used on the road.

But the Elite combines both show and go in what was originally a relatively affordable, practical package. This is a very nice example, but I hope the next owner spends the time and money to get it back on the road where it belongs.

-tad

1959 Ducati Elite 200 Dash

Little Hog: 1967 Harley Davidson Aermacchi 250 Sprint

1967 Harley Davidson Sprint 250 L Front

I normally don’t post too many Harleys on the site, simply because not many fit within our mission statement, aside from the odd XRTT that shows up for sale. But this little 250 Sprint looks very nice and fits the bill.

1967 Harley Davidson Sprint 250 R Side Rear

When Harley decided they needed a range of smaller displacement bikes to supplement their existing models, it made sense to go to an outside company, rather than try to reinvent the wheel and, by the early 1960’s, they owned a stake in Aermacchi, an Italian builder of small-displacement motorcycles. In the end, the relationship did not work out, as Harley fans never really embraced the little Italian singles: shades of their relationship with MV Agusta. Harley had the savvy to buy a really interesting asset, but lacked the vision to make the relationship work.

1967 Harley Davidson Sprint 250 Cockpit

The Harley Davidson-branded Aermacchi was powered by a 246cc OHV single that produced just 21hp and could push the little bike to a top speed of 76mph. Wet weight was just 270lbs, with good brakes and excellent handling. This was obviously a bit of a joke to the lumbering, muscular behemoths favored by Harley, but many can still be found circling racetracks at vintage events.

1967 Harley Davidson Sprint 250 Engine Detail

From the original eBay listing: 1967 Harley Davidson Aermacchi 250 Sprint TV replica for Sale

All the sheet metal is straight and dent free from a European only TV model found in Italy and mounted on a stock US model 67 H with a few changes outlined here.. The front fork is pre 67 to mount the very rare Ala Verde Road race style front fender.  The handlebars use the early solid mount triple clamp instead of the wobbly rubber mount and the handlebar is the 61/63 low rise European spec bar with attached lever perch’s. Handlebar clamps are first year super rare 61 sprint only aluminum cast and polished type. Exhaust header and muffler are NOS and Saddle is perfect with no defects. Chrome is very nice with some oxidation spots on rear rim and handlebar.

Rims are original Radaelli with painted spokes in very nice shape with vintage Pirelli tires, rideable but not suggested for spirited cornering. Front brake is more powerful later double actuated type. All wiring is stock and unmodified and all electrical is functional. Paint on tank is scratched here and there as it is I believe original as found used from Italy with factory paint . The rest of the paint is matched but the tank is more orange. Toolbox’s are perfect with no battery box rot. Battery is NOS Safa just activated. Overall looks great. The frame paint is very nice factory original. Bike starts on one or two kicks and shifts and stops perfectly. On startup after sitting some time you will likely see a puff of smoke and this is common with the horizontal cylinder configuration and clears up right away. Motor is unmodified. Carburetor filter assembly will tuck vertically into tank pocket but I believe it breaths better and looks cooler as seen. Also includes very rare center stand and retains the original side stand as well.

1967 Harley Davidson Sprint 250 Rear Suspension

In Italy, bikes in this class were built as durable transportation, but here in the US they were used as beaters or starter bikes and often discarded. They’re worth resurrecting: like old air-cooled VW’s, Aermacchis are durable and infinitely rebuildable, but require regular maintenance. Mechanically simple and honest, easy to work on, they make ideal starter classics. With a Buy It Now price of almost $6,000, this is a pricey example, but would make a great introduction to vintage biking for a young person or someone of smaller stature.

-tad

1967 Harley Davidson Sprint 250 R Side

Flying the Flag, Sort Of: 1967 Harley-Davidson 350cc Racer for Sale

1967 Aermacchi 350 Race Bike L Front

Today’s Harley-Davidson isn’t exactly a Harley. Looking for a quick way into the sporty middleweight market, Harley purchased 50% of Aermacchi’s motorcycle production operation in the early 1960’s. Rebranded as Harley-Davidsons, they clearly didn’t have much in common with the big v-twins from The Motor Company, other than that classic logo. Aermacchis were mechanically simple, but lightweight and nimble, with a history of racing successes in various forms of competition.

1967 Aermacchi 350 Race Bike R Rear

In fact, I’m sure it was a pain for shops and dealers, since they now had to have complete sets of both English and Metric tools! And historically, we know how that usually goes for outsiders who come into conflict with Harley’s entrenched mindset both inside the company and among their legions of dedicated fans: by 1978, they’d sold off Aermacchi.

1967 Aermacchi 350 Race Bike R Cockpit

Over at eBay, you can read a bit more about Aermacchi’s history in the very detailed original listing: 1967 Aermacchi 350cc Racer for Sale

With so much intermingling of parts and specifications, a race bike is often made up of from the best components for the job. So it is with the unquestionably beautiful bike offered here. It consists of a 350cc dry clutch motor in a 1967 Sprint H style frame, an Ala Verde style peanut-shape tank, and a twin-leading shoe front brake. Built to race, the bike was then subject to a comprehensive and complete restoration and since has been meticulously stored and displayed in a prominent Southern California collection. With only shake down miles on the rebuild, the bike will need re-commissioning before returning to the track. I would suggest tires in that.

Although he never rode the bike, it was signed by Mert Lawwill’s, who saw it at a concours event and expressed his appreciation for the quality of the build. Beautiful as it unquestionably is, the bike is ready to start and run or to take pride of place as a museum exhibit, such is the quality of the restoration and build.

 1967 Aermacchi 350 Race Bike Numberplate

These make excellent vintage race bikes, with good parts availability and plenty of tunability. They may lack the manic excitement and outright performance of a two-stroke, but they’re much more durable, meaning less time wrenching and more time riding. So if you’re looking to dip your feet into the vintage racing scene, and a Honda CB is just too pedestrian, this might make a great choice: the Buy It Now price is $9,900 which, while far from cheap, represents a pretty good price, considering the preparation that’s gone into this bike.

-tad

1967 Aermacchi 350 Race Bike L Side

Honorably Discharged: Ex-Military1955 Moto Guzzi Airone for Sale

1955 Moto Guzzi Airone L Side

For collectors and modern motorcyclists, the phrase “Italian motorcycle” conjures up images of sleek, exotic, motorcycles with shrieking engines and fragile beauty. But in the aftermath of World War II, there was a real need for cheap, reliable commuter motorcycles and Moto Guzzi, like many other manufacturers of the period, were there to provide practical transportation with the inevitable dash of Italian flair.

1955 Moto Guzzi Airone Engine

Moto Guzzis of the period were often named after birds, and the Airone or “Heron” makes for a great vintage ride today, with reliability and a broad spread of power from the 250cc four-stroke single that was surprisingly smooth, owing to the significant mass of the striking externally-mounted flywheel. Introduced in 1939 and produced until 1957, it’s also an incredibly long-lived model.

1955 Moto Guzzi Airone Bars

Famous for their reliability, many Guzzis were also used in police and military applications, and this particular bike appears to be one such machine.

From the original eBay listing: 1955 Moto Guzzi Airone for Sale

Very rare and well sorted 1955 Moto Guzzi Airone military model. This is a wonderful 250cc 4-stroke single-cylinder classic Italian motorcycle. It starts easily, idles well and runs strong.

This particular machine is totally stock, original and correct (including the military items – leg guards, luggage rack and more – which I have taken off but will go with the motorcycle to a new owner) other than the Mikuni carb and pod air filter, new battery, and replacement tires.

A few years ago, after a long search for an Airone, I purchased this machine out of long term storage. I spent time and money going through it mechanically – while leaving as much of the original cosmetics as possible – to get it to run well. I replaced the broken Dellorto carb with a new properly jetted Mikuni and sorted out the electrics and charging system. 

It is possible this is only Moto Guzzi military Airone in America – making it an unusual machine for collector or rider.

I replaced the badly damaged muffler with a correct one that looks right on this bike, installed a new clutch throwout bearing, a new battery and rewired the magneto kill switch to a small button on the handlebars. I added an in-line oil shut off valve to eliminate the notorious sumping issue. 

I unbolted the unnecessary military parts from the motorcycle to lesser the weight so I could compete with it in the Moto Giro USA, where it was a strong competitor. 

This classic Italian sport/touring machine features Clubman handlebars and Tomasselli-style levers (front brake and clutch) matched tool boxes and a handy center stand. Good usable tires with little wear, good battery, good charging system, light work, horn works, suspension works. 

1955 Moto Guzzi Airone Rear Suspension

Although these were relatively popular in Europe, very few made their way to the US, likely owing to the American proclivity for big-displacement vehicles suitable for crossing wide-open spaces. Ex-military machines can be a bit of a gamble, often having led hard lives. But Guzzi’s rugged construction is a definite asset here, and I really like the matte green paint and practical look of this bike.

-tad

1955 Moto Guzzi Airone R Side

Little Starling: 1967 Moto Guzzi Stornello Sport for Sale

1967 Moto Guzzi Stornello Sport R Side

Characterful little bikes like this don’t really exist anymore: today, 125’s and 250’s are starter bikes and commuters, designed to offer maximum value and a dash of style and color. But under the skin, they’re designed and built as cheaply as possible, and often look pretty nasty if you look too closely.

1967 Moto Guzzi Stornello Sport Dash

Make no mistake, the Stornello or “Starling” in Italian, was designed to be built cheaply, but, like many small Italian bikes of the 50’s and 60’s, although designed as practical, affordable transportation, still managed to infuse some style, class, and quality.

1967 Moto Guzzi Stornello Sport Seat

Equipped with lower bars, a racing seat [here replaced with a solo saddle], cut-down fenders, lightweight wheels, and increased fuel capacity, the Sport version of the little Stornello produced a bit more power than stock, a thundering 8hp from the 123cc motor. That may not sound like much, but the long-stroke, undersquare engine made good torque in the best Guzzi tradition.

1967 Moto Guzzi Stornello Sport Engine

From the original eBay listing: 1967 Moto Guzzi Stornello 125 Sport for Sale

All original accept horn and rear view mirror. Finish and all body parts with original patina clear coated. All mechanical components completely gone through. Engine: complete rebuild including Valve guides, valves, piston, rings, sleeve honed, new wrist pin, new kick start return spring, complete gasket set, cases buffed and detailed. Motor starts on first kick every time, all electronics work. Aftermarket turn signals added for safety. Tires are ok and original. Single saddle is correct and original from Italy but original American long seat is included. Not many of these in the US and this one turns heads. Current Indiana Title, plated

Condition: All original as found in barn, completely disassembled cleaned and assembled with original barn rust spots, all fender and case rust was treated and clear coated to preserve the look. Tank perfect, no rust, no clear coat. Italian seat and parcel rack has been added but original large seat is included. New wiring harness, lights and turn signals added for safety, original 6 volt system. Engine complete top to bottom rebuild, piston, rings, wrist pin, value guides, valves, kick start return spring and carb. Cases and cylinder buffed and detailed. Exhaust original all the way back. I am the second owner, found this bike in a barn in Ohio where it had been sitting for the past 20 years

1967 Moto Guzzi Stornello Sport Front

With a “Buy It Now” price of $3,000 for such a sweet little piece of history, although those turn signals would have to go: a nice set of small, black LED signals would do the same job, draw less current, and be far more subtle than the bits currently fitted. A very cool bike for a pretty low price.

-tad

1967 Moto Guzzi Stornello Sport L Side