Tagged: Sport

Unrestored Original: 1974 Moto Guzzi V7 Sport for Sale

1974 Moto Guzzi V7 Sport L Side Front

You’d be forgiven for thinking the site is now ClassicItalianSportbikesforSale.com, considering the raft of recent posts… and that impression won’t be changing this week, with two bikes from Mandello del Lario that were just too nice to pass up, starting with this beautiful V7 Sport.

1974 Moto Guzzi V7 Sport R Side

While Moto Guzzi has, for the past twenty years or so, been thought of as more of a sport-touring manufacturer, like an Italian BMW, it’s important to remember that the V7 Sport and LeMans were very serious sports motorcycles, as quick and nimble as anything being made at the time. In fact, a comparison between the Le Mans and the Ducati 900SS saw reviewers describing the Guzzi as having the freer-reving engine. And while the shaft drive’s torque-effect is noticeable, you quickly get used to it. It was only Guzzi’s inability to keep up with the relentless forward march of the Japanese manufacturers that forced them to recast their image in the same way the Brits were forced to in the 1980’s, trading “performance” for “sophistication” and “character.”

1974 Moto Guzzi V7 Sport Clocks

The V7 was where it all began for Guzzi’s v-twin sportbikes. The earlier loop-framed motorcycles offered stable handling, comfort, and reliability, but were too tall and too heavy to really perform as sportbikes. So Lino Tonti designed a new frame that wrapped around the longitudinally-mounted engine and bulky five-speed transmission, using removable down-tubes to allow for servicing. The engine was punched out to 748cc’s to comply with 750cc class limits and the generator was moved to the front of the engine to reduce overall height. The result was bike with a long, low silhouette that handled well, stopped quickly, and made plenty of power.

1974 Moto Guzzi V7 Sport R Side Rear

This example has relatively low mileage and is claimed to be in original, unrestored condition. To me, these bikes look best in the famous lime-green color, but you can’t go wrong with black. Later bikes had twin discs up front, but the earlier drum looks great and offered good stopping power.

1974 Moto Guzzi V7 Sport Front Brake

From the original eBay listing: 1974 Moto Guzzi V7 Sport for Sale

Third owner bike. It was purchased from a good friend who owned it for many years so I know this bike runs very well and personally ridden it on 80 miles canyon rides on weekends multiple times. Minimum patina and only original once.

From manufacture tag, it is June 1973 production model. Titled as a 74 when sold from the dealer in Canada. Matching number prestige original condition. Just take the time to look at all the photos which shows how beautiful it is especially the drum brakes and shark fins exhaust and other unique car engine concepts and details. Bike has been documented in logs of all service done over the years with receipts. It has constantly been maintained and serviced as necessary.

This is Moto Guzzi’s Sport model that company used in competition. Drum brakes works excellent. Electric start by push button on right handlebar or twisting ignition key like a car makes riding practical. Torque on the V7 pulls fast and cruise the freeways easily over 80mph. Handlebars can be easily moved to upper position for great comfort and long flat seat make it an excellent touring bike with the passenger.

Bike has been stored indoors, ridden, and maintained, waxed routinely.

Clear CA title and registration in my name.

1974 Moto Guzzi V7 Sport Engine

The seller also includes a list of maintenance and recent work that’s gone into the bike over at the original listing. He does also mention and point out that there is one broken cooling fin that’s hiding under the intake on the right side of the bike, but says that it can be fixed if the head is ever off the bike.

1974 Moto Guzzi V7 Sport Tank Detail

Other than that, this bike looks to be in exceptional original condition and is ready to ride. His Buy It Now price is set at $19,400.00 which is on the high side, but is far from outrageous, especially considering the condition. These are steadily appreciating classics that you can ride regularly if you choose and, if I had the cash, there’d be one in my garage for sure.

-tad

1974 Moto Guzzi V7 Sport L Side

Low-Mileage Bevel: 1974 Ducati 750 Sport for Sale

1974 Ducati 750 Sport R Side

Ducati’s 750 Sport is one of the most iconinc motorcycles of any era, an instantly-recognizable bike that looked as fast as it was. The earlier 750GT was probably a better, far more practical motorcycle. But the Sport looked like sex on wheels, and made full use of the performance available from the very capbable package.

1974 Ducati 750 Sport L Front

The Sport was built up from the standard 750GT and featured a lighter crankshaft, higher-compression pistons, and bigger carbs. One thing it did not have was Ducati’s now ubiquitous desmodromic heads. Only the SuperSport models got that little technological nugget, although the Sport did use the very accurate tower shaft and bevel drive system to operate the overhead cams.

1974 Ducati 750 Sport Clocks

The Sport obviously looked different as well: the tank was longer and narrower, and there were no passenger accommodations. And while the 750GT was a much more practical motorcycle in real world applications, the Sport had that extra dose of sex appeal

1974 Ducati 750 Sport L Side

The 750 Sport was one of the best-handling bikes of the period, and with 62hp and a fat wedge of midrange torque on tap and five gears to choose from, it had the punch to get you between corners quickly as well.

1974 Ducati 750 Sport L Side Rear

From the original eBay listing: 1974 Ducati 750 Sport for Sale

12,019 Kilometers  (7,451 miles)

This is a 1973 production year of which only 746 were produced – see Ian Falloon’s excellent book – “The Ducati 750 Bible, pages 74-75” on VIN numbers. “The 1973 750 Sport was a very elemental motorcycle, the lightest of all the 750s and totally uncompromised.” Page 76. I can attest to this statement as it is a no frills, takes no prisoners and is raw & visceral experience.

I’ve owned this 1974 Ducati 750 Sport since March of 2007. It is in beautiful and extraordinary condition with 12,019 kilometers (7,451 miles) on the clock! I have the history of the bike from December 1995. A gentleman in Massachusetts purchased it December 1995 and later sold it in May 2004 to another gentleman in Massachusetts. He kept it until I purchased the bike in March 2007. The bike has only covered 591 kilometers (366 miles) since December 1995. The bike sits in the garage, covered up and only ridden a few miles each summer. It has always started on the first or second kick even after not being ridden for months. I have photocopies of the previous titles listing names, dates and odometer statements, which may be inspected and are included with the sale.

Original Veglia instruments with only 12,019 Kilometers (7,451 miles). The speedometer has the correct trip reset knob

As you can see from the pictures, there are two gas tanks. The one on the ground plus 4 additional pictures is the original fiberglass tank. Due to ethanol mandated by Colorado, I never put gas into that tank. Other than a slight lifting of the decal (see photo), it is in excellent condition. It’s been stored in my office since I took ownership. 

The tank that is on the bike is a reproduction. I purchased that tank from a well-known Ducati specialist (name not disclosed but receipt is included) that was supposed to be ethanol resistant. Additionally, Caswell coating was used but the ethanol gas still affected the tank. It has bubbled on the side but is fully serviceable for everyday ridding – there are no leaks or seeping of gas 

All receipts and documents that I have accumulated during my ownership will be provided.

1974 Ducati 750 Sport Engine

The seller includes quite a bit more information over at the original listing, so be sure to check it out if this bike piques your interest.

I’m a huge fan of the particular shade of yellow used on the Sport. Yellow can be a really vibrant, attention-getting color, but this particular yellow is almost subtle. It’s certainly a color that flatters the Sport. Technically, 1974 saw some changes to the Sport, with black cases giving way to polished items, and a Brembo front brake replacing the Scarab shown here. I wouldn’t worry about that too much: the black cases look great, and many bikes of the era used whatever was lying around the factory, so it’s very possible these bits are original.

All-in-all, one of the most desirable sports motorcycles of all time, and likely to continue to appreciate in value.

-tad

1974 Ducati 750 Sport R Side Front

Little Starling: 1967 Moto Guzzi Stornello Sport for Sale

1967 Moto Guzzi Stornello Sport R Side

Characterful little bikes like this don’t really exist anymore: today, 125’s and 250’s are starter bikes and commuters, designed to offer maximum value and a dash of style and color. But under the skin, they’re designed and built as cheaply as possible, and often look pretty nasty if you look too closely.

1967 Moto Guzzi Stornello Sport Dash

Make no mistake, the Stornello or “Starling” in Italian, was designed to be built cheaply, but, like many small Italian bikes of the 50’s and 60’s, although designed as practical, affordable transportation, still managed to infuse some style, class, and quality.

1967 Moto Guzzi Stornello Sport Seat

Equipped with lower bars, a racing seat [here replaced with a solo saddle], cut-down fenders, lightweight wheels, and increased fuel capacity, the Sport version of the little Stornello produced a bit more power than stock, a thundering 8hp from the 123cc motor. That may not sound like much, but the long-stroke, undersquare engine made good torque in the best Guzzi tradition.

1967 Moto Guzzi Stornello Sport Engine

From the original eBay listing: 1967 Moto Guzzi Stornello 125 Sport for Sale

All original accept horn and rear view mirror. Finish and all body parts with original patina clear coated. All mechanical components completely gone through. Engine: complete rebuild including Valve guides, valves, piston, rings, sleeve honed, new wrist pin, new kick start return spring, complete gasket set, cases buffed and detailed. Motor starts on first kick every time, all electronics work. Aftermarket turn signals added for safety. Tires are ok and original. Single saddle is correct and original from Italy but original American long seat is included. Not many of these in the US and this one turns heads. Current Indiana Title, plated

Condition: All original as found in barn, completely disassembled cleaned and assembled with original barn rust spots, all fender and case rust was treated and clear coated to preserve the look. Tank perfect, no rust, no clear coat. Italian seat and parcel rack has been added but original large seat is included. New wiring harness, lights and turn signals added for safety, original 6 volt system. Engine complete top to bottom rebuild, piston, rings, wrist pin, value guides, valves, kick start return spring and carb. Cases and cylinder buffed and detailed. Exhaust original all the way back. I am the second owner, found this bike in a barn in Ohio where it had been sitting for the past 20 years

1967 Moto Guzzi Stornello Sport Front

With a “Buy It Now” price of $3,000 for such a sweet little piece of history, although those turn signals would have to go: a nice set of small, black LED signals would do the same job, draw less current, and be far more subtle than the bits currently fitted. A very cool bike for a pretty low price.

-tad

1967 Moto Guzzi Stornello Sport L Side

Classic Roundcase: 1972 Ducati 750GT for Sale

1972 Ducati 750GT R Side

As always, range-topping sportbikes create a halo-effect and drive showroom traffic but, in the end, it’s lower-spec machines that keep the lights on and put food on the table. The 750SS may have been the sexy poster child for Ducati in the 1970’s, but that bike’s rarity and uncomfortable riding position means that the more mundane 750GT is a less expensive, far more practical proposition.

1972 Ducati 750GT L Front

Sharing frame and basic powertrain with the sportier Sport, the GT was designed as a real-world motorcycle, with relatively comfortable ergonomics. Interestingly, neither the GT nor the Sport actually featured the now universal Desmo heads and made do with regular valve springs. Valve springs, while less sexy in theory, make for easier and less costly maintenance. Luckily, the iconic bevel-drive and tower-shaft arrangement features on all of Ducuati’s “L-twin” engines of the period, so you can still help your mechanic afford that new addition on his home if you don’t like wrenching on bikes yourself.

1972 Ducati 750GT L Side Rear

The early “round case” models like this one command a premium compared to later models with restyled bits. There’s little functional difference between the two, other than the usual evolutionary changes, but the look of the original design is considered much more elegant, and they command higher prices.

1972 Ducati 750GT Dash

From the original eBay listing: 1972 Ducati 750 GT for Sale

Runs and drive great. clean AZ title, 750S751085, engine number 750683. 26246 on odo, but history of actual mileage unclear. steel gas tank professionally lined with caswell. fresh paint, frame just powder coated. new tires. fenders and exhaust rechromed . rear fender has been shortened (I didn’t do it). instrument pod solid, but shows cracks. electronic ignition and everything electrical works, including the charging system. wiring not pretty, could use a new wiring harness. side stand will swing up closer to exhaust, just didn’t move it enough when I put it on the center stand for the pictures. pictures don’t do it justice. the bike is stunning in person.

1972 Ducati 750GT R Side Engine

Plenty of time left on the auction, although there’s no activity so far. The bike is in very nice condition, with fresh paint on the tank and frame, but $18,000 seems like a pretty high starting point for an auction to me, so we’ll see how this progresses as the week unfolds.

-tad

1972 Ducati 750GT L Side

The Other Bike from Bologna: 1953 Mondial 200 Sport

1953 Mondial 200 Sport R Side Front

History is littered with the corpses of car and motorcycle manufacturers that didn’t survive various economic crises and paradigm shifts and, unfortunately, boutique manufacturer Mondial is listed amongst the fallen. While we normally associate the failure of a manufacturer with the quality of their products, it’s generally far more complicated than that. The 1960’s saw a glut of cheap, incredibly well-engineered motorcycles from Japan flood a market formerly dominated by the European manufacturers that had grown by leaps and bounds in a postwar economy bolstered by the demand for inexpensive wheeled transportation.

1953 Mondial 200 Sport R Side Rear

Although the handling of these inexpensive machines was pretty far off the standard established by the racebred motorcycles from England and Italy, for most people, that hardly mattered, and quality, reliability, and even cheap speed trumped the cornering prowess of bikes from companies like Mondial.

Mondial built motorcycles from 1948-1979 and were very successful in Grand Prix racing during the 1950s. Although most Italian manufacturers of this period focused their efforts on practical, affordable transportation, Mondial was much more interested in building small-volume, high-quality motorcycles with a more sporting intent. Perhaps could be considered the Velocette of Italy. With handbuilt quality and performance, they could perhaps be thought of as the Italian equivalent of Italy and even designed and built a desmodromic cylinder head before Ducati, although it was never actually produced.

1953 Mondial 200 Sport L Side Engine

From the original eBay listing: 1953 Mondial 200 Sport

1953 Mondial 200 Sport in very nice restored condition. Everything has been redone. Motor was rebuilt in Italy and runs and shifts fine. Bike went through an extensive cosmetic restoration. All chrome has been redone and all aluminum has had many hours of polishing. Bike comes with a clean title. Any questions about the bike you can contact me directly. This is a super rare bike and a great opportunity to add to any bike collection.

Interestingly, the year 2000 saw a brief revival of the Mondial name and the creation of a Honda RC51 -powered superbike. This unusual engine choice was only possible because in 1957, Mondial provided Honda with one of their winning racebikes to use as inspiration. Honda wanted to repay the gesture and allowed the new Mondial superbike to use their engine.

1953 Mondial 200 Sport L Side

With its striking red and gold paint, this might easily be mistaken for a 50’s Ducati, although Mondial’s traditional colors were generally silver and blue. Bidding is active on this little Mondial, with just one day left on the auction. At $7,700 the reserve has been met, which seems a fair price for such a good-looking, unusual motorcycle.

-tad

1953 Mondial 200 Sport R Side

Low Miles, Low-Buck Exotica: 1980 Moto Morini 500 Sport for Sale

1980 Moto Morini 500 Sport L Front

For those of you who thought Italian exotica were far out of reach, check out this very nice 1980 Moto Morini 500 Sport.  Postwar Italy saw a boom in two-wheeled motorcycle manufacture: the population of a country devastated by war was eager to get back to work and was hungry for cheap, stylish transportation. Obviously, many manufacturers of scooters, mopeds, and motorcycles came into existence and quickly disappeared during this period, but a few survived into the modern day, or have been resurrected, like zombies in Armani suits.

1980 Moto Mornini 500 Sport Dash

Moto Morini was one of the latter, a company that actually began before World War I, then faded after a purchase by Cagiva in the late 1980’s, only to be brought back again during the late 90’s as a sort of brutish Ducati rival, a shame considering their earlier history of making smaller-engined sporting machines. In fact, Morini’s insistence on not catering to the American market by creating larger-displacement bikes may have sealed the company’s doom: the 500 Sport shown here was as big as they got.

1980 Moto Morini 500 Sport R Side

But don’t let the relatively small engines fool you: these are serious sporting machines with revvy and sweet v-twins that made useful power and returned excellent fuel mileage, capable of embarrassing much more powerful machines in the corners and on the brakes. With a very rare for the period six-speed gearbox and a compact 72° engine with a rubber belt to drive the cam and Heron heads, Morinis were technologically advanced, brains-over-brawn machines.

1980 Moto Morini 500 Sport L Engine

Of course, no Italian bike of the period would be complete without some sort of mechanical foible. In Morini’s case, it was the fitting of a kickstart lever as well as a generally useless electric start. While it is possible to find bikes with the electric starter in good working condition, they’re far from reliable and most Morini owners seem to just ignore them when they fail and use the kick start.

1980 Moto Morini 500 Sport L Rear

From the original eBay listing, which includes more of the seller’s history with the marque than of the bike itself: 1980 Moto Morini 500 Sport for Sale

I was witness to the entire history of this particular machine from when it left Herm Baver’s (Herdan Corp.) Dealer/Distributership to the present time. Sometime in the early eighties I bought my 1980 3 1/2 Sport Morini from my friend Jason who was a real Morini fancier and who had bought a number of machines from Herm. I was living on the Lower East Side of Manhattan at the time and my neighbor Ira, who was riding an old Triumph Bonnie then, liked my 350 Morini enough that he bought this 500 Sport from Jason soon after. Both these Moto Morinis, it should be noted, had only the mileage registered that’s required to ride them from Port Clinton, Pa (the home to this day of Herdan Corp.) to Jason’s house in Greenwood lake, N.Y. They were barely broken in.

Anyway, the city’s a tough place to have a really nice motorcycle and Ira was never comfortable leaving it any- -where so he sold it to an Englishman I’d sold some other bikes to and went back to his old Bonnie. Soon after, John, the Englishman, went back to Jolly Old leaving the bike with me and here it jolly well is(still in Ira’s name) ready for a new “la Strega” transfer (included with the bike) on the saddle tailpiece and probably a set of tires, as the mint originals are maybe getting a bit wooden after 34 years. Aside from that there’s a hairline crack in one of the side covers and a scratch at the back of the tank near the saddle (see photos). Otherwise it’s the thing of beauty “time capsule” you see here.

Funny, I’ve been referring to my Ducati as “la Strega” since I got her. For those of you not fluent in Italian, “Strega” translates directly as “witch”, although my Italian buddy also reliably tells me it’s also used as a synonym for “bitch.” In either case, probably not the best nickname for such a fun little bike! The seller doesn’t include all that much detail regarding the actual maintenance history, but you can probably infer from his background and the cosmetic condition that it’s been pretty well cared for.

1980 Moto Morini 500 Sport Clocks

These bikes have been climbing in value for a while now: 7 or 8 years ago, when I was bike shopping for budget Italian machines like this, they could be had for $2,500, if you could actually find one. They are typically well-loved, but also generally well-used and patina’d bikes in keeping with their low-cost exotic status. But this may be the very nicest example I’ve seen for sale, although perhaps that’s just the really nice, high-resolution photos talking!

Bidding is active, but the reserve has not been met at just over $4k with about six days to go on the auction.

1980 Moto Morini 500 Sport L Side

The Morini name may not have the cache of Ducati or MV Agusta, and their smaller-displacements and slightly forgotten status has kept prices comparatively low. The bikes are reliable, and maintenance parts are generally available for them if you don’t mind doing a bit of research. If you’ve always fancied a classic Italian, but thought they were out of reach, keep an eye on this one!

-tad

1980 Moto Morini 500 Sport L Front Close

1980 Moto Morini 3½ Sport for Sale

1980 Moto Morini 350 L side

With even the unlovely Ducati 860GT and Mark II and III Moto Guzzis rapidly escalating in value, riders on the hunt for budget Italian exotica may finally be turning to Morini to get their fix.

Either because of a lack of development budget or sheer stubbornness, Morini never got caught up in the frenzy to develop larger machines for American buyers that afflicted… Well just about every other major manufacturer. They stuck with their middleweight philosophy that stressed handling and light weight, and the 3½ [344cc] was the little brother to their 500, but was in no way de-contented or stripped-down: it was a legitimate sportbike that could easily embarrass larger machines with an experienced pilot at the helm.

1980 Moto Morini 350 Dash

The 72º v-twin was compact and smooth, and made the most of its respectable 37bhp [in Sport form] with a rare-for-the-period six-speed gearbox. This innovative engine featured traditional pushrods, but used a toothed belt to drive the camshaft and featured Heron heads that gave excellent fuel economy.

This particular example features an angular full fairing that, until recently, I hadn’t seen before on a Morini. Does it work? Probably. Is it particularly good-looking? Well I’m not a fan, but if you love early 80’s Guzzis, this might be right up your alley. It’s likely easy to remove and reinstall if you ever intend to sell it.

1980 Moto Morini 350 R Bar

From the original listing: 1980 Moto Morini 3½ Sport for Sale

Offered for sale, a fully-sorted Morini 3 1/2 Sport (yes, a real Sport, has the “S” stamp on the engine, see pics). 

Was owned (we believe original owner) by a motorcycle collector who unfortunately cannot ride anymore due to injuries from a car accident, then acquired by long-time Italian motorcycle specialist in 2012. All issues sorted out and is now turn-key, unlike a couple other vintage Morini’s that have popped up here recently. Had posted this here a few times and decided to throw some more maintenance items at it before re-posting. 

Original paint and tires

Factory fairing and lowers

Modified mufflers with re-packable inserts.

Electric tach and starter working fine

Cracked red turn signal reflector, right rear, repaired poorly

Bike is being ridden daily, mileage may change. Just put 200 miles on last weekend, no problems.

The seller mentions that the starter is working fine, which is definitely notable, since it wasn’t exactly reliable, even when new. No worries though: the bike also featured a kick-start and that’s generally how people get them going these days.

1980 Moto Morini 350 Front

The listing also features a very nice video of the bike being started and revved.

These are popular bikes among fans of classics who like to use their bikes, and parts are available to keep these on the road. Honestly, these have always been hard to find, but prices have been almost embarrassingly low for far too long and are slowly on the rise. Grab one now and stash it in your garage, or show up at bike nights and impress with your eclectic taste.

-tad

1980 Moto Morini 350 R Side

1974 Ducati 750 Sport for Sale

1974 Ducati 750 Sport L Side

Yellow is a tricky color to get right. Get it wrong, and your car or bike looks like a Tonka toy truck or a fast banana. I still remember the 90’s Toyota MR2 in factory yellow, a sickly, almost-neon color that did not flatter… But of course Ducati got it right, and the yellow used on their 750 Sport is a classic, rich, almost orange color that manages to be both flamboyant and mature at the same time.

Honestly though, the bike probably could have been painted up in any old shade and would still be a winner: that vivid color compliments one of the best-looking and most desirable bikes of the period.

1974 Ducati 750 Sport Clocks

Sleek and elemental, the 750 Sport was based on the more reserved 750GT but included the usual raft of high-performance upgrades to the internals appropriate for the “deluxe” model, along with larger carburetors to feed the greedy cylinders. Interestingly, the Sport did not feature Ducati’s Desmodromic valve-actuation, which was found only on the twins that powered the SuperSport bikes. Lower-spec twins used traditional valve springs.

But unless you’re a Desmo fetishist, you shouldn’t care: with blacked-out cases, purposeful stance, and a sleek profile, it will still make the right noises and offer some of the very best handling the period had to offer.

1974 Ducati 750 Sport R Side Engine

From the original eBay listing: 1974 Ducati Sport for Sale

Wonderful example of a Ducati 750 Sport. This bike appears on Robert Miller’s Ducati Roundcase Bevel Drive Engine/Frame list as bike #770 (list is available at Bevelheaven.com and includes frame/engine numbers) and is a 1974 model year as confirmed using Ian Falloon’s Authenticity and Restoration Guide. Bike has been on display for the last 16 years. Total tear down less than 1500 miles ago… frame sandblasted & powdercoated, bodywork painted & cleared, engine gone through top & bottom by Wheels Unlimited of Rochester, MN (Have all receipts for rebuild). Bike is currently shod with dual Brembos with braided SS line rather than single Scarab (original brake will come with bike as will bar end mirror), 40 mm Dell’Orto carbs, Ceramic coated exhaust by Jet Coat.  Mechanically a 10. Overall in very good condition. Speedometer is currently not working, but have new speedo drive to correct. Shift linkage (externally) is a bit sloppy & could stand to be shimmed.  Chrome on headlight shell has minor pitting & ring has ding…see picture.  Rims are Akront.

1974 Ducati 750 Sport Front

The seller indicates that the bike isn’t completely original, but the dual-disc front end is a very appropriate period modification and will be much appreciated if you intend to ride the thing. Either way, the parts are included and it can easily be returned to stock. I like the slight imperfections: it would encourage me to use it regularly, instead of parking it in my garage to slowly become a museum piece.

Sharp eyes will also notice the Ducati Supermono for sale there in the background, another very desirable Ducati from a much later era.

-tad

1974 Ducati 750 Sport R Side

 

1956 Moto Guzzi Airone Sport for Sale

1956 Moto Guzzi Airone Sport R Side

There’s been a spate of very cool vintage Guzzis up on eBay recently. Most of these bikes were built as stylish, but dependable commuters, which makes them great as vintage rides, since they’re far less temperamental than might be expected from a classic Italian sportbike. They’re not highly-strung racing machines, although they are sporty and reward the rider with easily accessible performance.

1956 Moto Guzzi Airone Sport L Side Front

Moto Guzzi’s Airone [“Heron”] was first introduced in 1939, but the Second World War interrupted production as Guzzi turned its attention to wartime manufacturing. Production of the Airone resumed after the war ended and the bike, with various improvements, was built until 1957!

In all forms, the 250cc engine was durable, refined, and smooth. Guzzi’s signature external “meat-slicer” flywheel allowed for proper rotational mass to provide that signature effortless torque and smoothness at all revs, but kept engine cases compact.

1956 Moto Guzzi Airone Sport L Side Engine

The Sport version for sale here was first available in 1949 and had what, at first, might appear to be only minor improvements in performance: 13hp versus 9.5hp and a 59mph top speed versus 73mph. But the Sport offers almost 35% increase in horsepower and a nearly 24% increase in top speed over the standard model!

1956 Moto Guzzi Airone Sport Dash

From the original eBay listing: 1956 Moto Guzzi Airone for Sale

This is a very nice example of a Guzzi  Airone Sport 250. The “Sport” version has considerably better performance than the more common “Turismo” model. It comes with aluminum rims, a lower handlebar, a forward facing foot brake and has the foot-pegs further back.  The higher compression engine gives this cool bike fairly brisk performance.
250cc. Overhead valve 4 stroke. 4 speed. Good running and riding condition.
Older restoration still in very presentable condition with a few minor cosmetic flaws. New battery but runs on a magneto.
The fairly rare optional speedometer was added at a later date and reads 5513 kms  but this is not the original mileage.
Clear California title in my name. Also comes with the original June 1956 Italian title showing ownership history for historical purposes.
You are welcome to visit in Tarzana (San Fernando Valley part of Los Angeles).

1956 Moto Guzzi Airone Sport R Side Engine

The Airone epitomizes Guzzis of this era, with a reputation for economy, reliability, and style with deceptive performance: the limits may not be especially high, but you can use all of the performance all of the time. This example is from near the very end of the Airone’s long production cycle and features a classic style with the expected refinement of a bike in production for nearly 20 years.

-tad

1956 Moto Guzzi Airone Sport L Side

 

1966 Moto Guzzi 125 Sport for Sale

1966 Moto Guzzi 125 Sport R Tank

The Little Guzzi trend continues with this nice, restored 1966 Moto Guzzi 125 Sport, also known as the “Stornello.” Don’t let the bright red paint and Italian style fool you: this was designed as practical, reliable transportation for the masses. The dash of style just helped move product out the door and differentiate Guzzi’s bike from competing bikes.

1966 Moto Guzzi 125 Sport L Rear

Its 123cc pushrod single made a modest 7bhp, but that number doesn’t tell the whole story. The little Stornello had a supremely flexible powerband and Guzzi’s characteristic spread of usable torque, perfect for the commuting and general riding duties for which the bike was intended.

1966 Moto Guzzi 125 Sport Front

From the original eBay listing: 1966 Moto Guzzi 125 Sport for sale

I am selling my rare and collectable Moto Guzzo 125 Sport, I have too many bikes. The bike is completely restored. The engine was bored to .040 with new piston, rings, pin, new valves and guides. The carb is original, gearbox is smooth and has a new kickstart spring  and seals. Original exhaust system in beautiful condition. Frame was media blasted and powdercoated in black. Tank, fenders, and all sheet metal are original and re-sprayed with PPG in original color. New Michelin tires and tubes, new battery. Seat was rebuilt on original seat pan. The ignition/light switch in not functional and the lights run off the battery-no recharge. This is a beautiful and nice riding bike and a true collector machine. No starting price but there is a reserve. I would prefer that the buyer pick up but I could crate if you arrange shipping. I have a clear Texas title. Bid high-this is a sweet Guzzi. Buy yourself a Xmas gift.

1966 Moto Guzzi 125 Sport Dash

These little Guzzis aren’t particularly exotic in Europe, but here in the land of 800 pound motorcycles, they didn’t sell too many, and they’re correspondingly rare as a result. The 125’s are very robustly built and reliable, as they were intended as sporty commuters, not highly-strung racers, but parts to keep them running can prove difficult if you plan to ride, rather than show your bike. This looks to be a fun one, and bidding is still south of $2,000 with two days left in the auction.

-tad

1966 Moto Guzzi 125 Sport Tank Close